Artists, How Did You Learn?

Artists, How Did You Learn?

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This is a discussion on Artists, How Did You Learn? within the The Art Museum forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Various skills that I've learned have been through different processes. I learned guitar from experimentation and videos Dance from lessons ...

  1. #1

    Artists, How Did You Learn?

    Various skills that I've learned have been through different processes.

    I learned guitar from experimentation and videos
    Dance from lessons
    French from classes

    and now I'd like to learn to paint. I think watching videos and copying others until I get a feel for it would be best, but I'm curious what artists here would say helped them the most?


    I'm going for the title of renaissance man. Aka, a man of many talents.



  2. #2

    Doing exercises from the book Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Did them in some art classes I took.

  3. #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Denature View Post
    and now I'd like to learn to paint. I think watching videos and copying others until I get a feel for it would be best, but I'm curious what artists here would say helped them the most?
    Copying as you said is the best way to start off imo. At first your style will heavily resemble other people's styles but the more you learn the more you are forced to watch other people's methods and you begin to implement techniques they have until eventually, your own style will evolve.

    Many other artists say that using references is the best thing you can do along with tutorials and you shouldn't be ashamed of it in the beginner phase as you basically would "copy" the real world from a picture as well as from a reference another artists made.

    At least for me it is easier to follow Youtube tutorials or just watch other people do it, regardless of whether they explain what they are doing or if it is just them drawing and chatting about various topics outside of "art".

    Two or three years ago I visited a drawing workshop for a few months and while it was nice to know that there were others who shared this hobby with you, the lessons did not really... do anything. I needed my own place and quiet to fully concentrate and always felt like I was being watched.

    Visual learning, that's what has helped me the most. Teachers can help you but I don't have experience with it as I only visited this one course and because such courses are way too expensive for me to participate (although I wish I could, honestly).

    You seem to be fine with taking classes so that shouldn't be a problem either. I'd also suggest making quick sketches of people, animals and objects you see. You could also use Pinterest for reference drawings.

    AnneM, ENFPurpleKitti, MeltedSorbet and 1 others thanked this post.

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  5. #4

    I saw someone drawing, using a drawing book. I went "I can do that..." and just started copying what they were doing. Started doing it by myself, but it didn't really take root till I was in middle school. But I quickly realized I had no talent for it, and I only got to where I was with dedication and practice.
    ENFPurpleKitti thanked this post.

  6. #5

    I started drawing when I was a child. So it's not really something that I could recall or advise about. And I wouldn't call myself an artist since it's not my profession and I have not been doing art very much for a long time.

    I suppose if you are wanting to have many skills, you should start out with the basic of drawing:

    Value (different shades of light to dark--the study of light and how it reflects off of/falls onto objects).

    Form (how to see and take in the form of an object--it's substance and shape).

    Lines/Brushstroke

    And also Composition (the way a painting, drawing, or photograph is laid out...how the eyes move around the painting.

    Maybe Perspective, though it's more useful in architectural drawings and cityscapes.

    (This is all the stuff you'd learn in a beginning drawing class--so I'm just assuming you're an absolute beginner.)

    You can also understand some of these if you read about art history.

    Imo, a general, well-rounded education in art is a good idea if you are interested in being a jack of all trades. I think developing an appreciation and understanding of art is better than trying to force yourself to learn a lifetime worth of experience if you aren't interested in putting in hundreds of hours drawing.
    Last edited by MeltedSorbet; 02-10-2019 at 10:06 PM.
    ENFPurpleKitti thanked this post.

  7. #6

    Perseverance in the long term and focus in the moment.

    Observation and understanding. There are a lot of references source already mentioned here, also every day life has tons of it.

    Don't rushing to conclusions about your skills.

    Find like minded people related to your art.
    Erase aiming for the high fives of random acquaintances or the destructive arguments projected from their perspective.

  8. #7

    Renaissance men are the most attractive, imo. I wish more men these days would aspire to become one.

    As for art, there is no real right or wrong way to get started with it besides start. Jump in. Grab some pencils, pens, paints, etc and start feeling what it's like just to hold something in your hand that spreads creation right in front of your eyes. Observing and drawing what you see is an important part of learning how to draw while getting a feel for the materials as well. Also, experiment with different paints and papers as well as ink! There is a lot of variety and you never know what type of medium will be your favorite until you try it.

    Use as many different resources as you can. Videos are great, but so are step-by-steps, tutorials, books and lessons ((when available)). Go for everything! Though it's probably best to start with the basics like line, perspective, value and color theory. Still life drawing is a really important and relaxing thing to do for learning the basics, too!

    The best advice I ever received about art was from a mentor when I was a teenager who always said "Art is all about learning how to see." If you can understand that then you are already in the right state of mind to create art.

    Art is a skill and therefore takes a lot of regular practice to maintain as well as continue improving. Sometimes you'll go through long periods of feeling like you're not improving at all and then BAM you have an "aha moment" and things you were struggling with will start coming together. The best thing you can do is simply to not give up and you'll grow with practice, patience and time! It often happens where your new "best work" will completely surprise you!

    Best wishes on your artistic journey~
    Last edited by Hurricane Matthew; 02-11-2019 at 04:07 AM.
    ENFPurpleKitti and Squirt thanked this post.

  9. #8

    I could say study and all that jazz but I just started at a very early age. My family were very supportive of me doing art so that helps a lot.
    This isn't to say that it's a requirement to start early, but it is helpful to take on the mindset of a kid.
    Kids aren't afraid to make mistakes and experiment. I don't think I ever cared about things looking good until I got older (but even now I still allow myself to be "bad"), I just did art because it was fun and I wanted to externalize my ideas. In time you just get better and can seem "talented" to others.
    So don't be afraid to make a mess.


    Last edited by Hexigoon; 03-25-2019 at 11:25 PM.
    ENFPurpleKitti and Doccium thanked this post.

  10. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Doccium View Post

    Many other artists say that using references is the best thing you can do along with tutorials and you shouldn't be ashamed of it in the beginner any phase as you basically would "copy" the real world from a picture as well as from a reference another artists made.
    Fix'd. :D

    But generally speaking, unless you're specifically drawing/ painting from real life (portraits of existing people, for example), you should find yourself relying less and less on references or copying. Just remember to credit your sources if you post or showcase them publicly of course.
    Doccium and Squirt thanked this post.

  11. #10

    Learned to make art by doing it all of the time.

    Started really young. I traced and copied everything that caught my fancy, or tried to draw from life when something interested me. I often created the same images over and over and over again until I mastered that image (at least to satisfaction). Of course, as an adult it is more difficult to have the kind of patience for repetition that a child has.

    Studying color theory, design principles, etc. was the next phase. Taking classes from competent instructors, and approaching it as an academic subject with others, advanced my skills beyond what I was capable on my own (after the copy everything phase of childhood). I had to take a step back before I could leap forward (similar to how a toddler learns to copy phrases before they understand grammar, and then when they begin to processing grammar rules they suddenly speak less goodly while they learn to form their own sentences).

    Funny thing about copying... I found an old sketchbook not that long ago, and I really liked the style I was developing in it. I "copied" it for a new drawing and felt like I was plagiarizing myself.
    Last edited by Squirt; 04-30-2019 at 04:02 PM.
    ENFPurpleKitti thanked this post.


     
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