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Offense in comedy

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This is a discussion on Offense in comedy within the The Art Museum forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Originally Posted by ultracrepidarian I personally am almost entirely focused on the intent which I read from another, and very, ...

  1. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by ultracrepidarian View Post
    I personally am almost entirely focused on the intent which I read from another, and very, very few 'unintentional' offenses can really shake or bother me. I can't even think of an example at the moment, though I suppose that.. there have been times when others have put me or someone else down, as a way to prop themselves up temporarily, like as a form of social currency or whatever.. and even then I can feel that it's usually not a truly malicious, personal attack.. but more out of an internal deprivation, insecurity and defense mechanism which brings such focus to that individuals need, rather than the collateral damage, so that the harm inflected on others is slightly hazy and hanging just around the peripheral, not directly realized.

    I think there may be a connection between Fi and Fe, focusing on intention vs context/social sensitivity. I've noticed that a number of my Fe buds not only don't give a shit about intention, but will even go so far as to say 'who knows what the true intent is, how could I know or be sure of that? Such person *should know* that is not socially acceptable.' So, they are less strong it seems, In deciphering ones deeper, personal motivations, and as such better at establishing specific guidelines of behavior and communication? I dunno.. it's just a thought.

    I get into trouble when I assume/project that others can read my intentions as well as I believe I can others (though I know this can easily break down, with people saying 'but how do you ever really know? You aren't in others head space, feeling what they feel!') and, that in itself is a very complicated, tedious topic which I've gone the rounds before on, and don't care to right now) so I throw particular expressions or taunts around, mistakenly believing someone is 'on the same page'.

    I love Bill Burr, hilarious.
    And that isn't because I agree with all of even most of his opinions or narratives, it's because he honors his own unique story, he has conviction in expressing his narrative without doubt, without fear, without shame. Or, even when he feels those things, he can be honest about that struggle, about reconciling various conditionings and beliefs he's absorbed, how those things effect the way he sees the world and must reconcile social changes. This is why Bill Burr is so great, because he's authentic... he changes with the times but it's an organic movement, he's not going to change his feelings and narratives unless that shit really makes sense to him, he will not 'buy into' being a way because others say so. I love that, those who can honor who they are, where they come from, the conditionings, values, life experiences, etc. that have shaped them.. I love people who will not devalue their own roots no matter what 'new' or 'progressive' the ideas of the times may be.
    My Fe may be low but I'm definitely one of the Fe folk.

    If what I want to say has a high chance of offending someone I just don't say it. We don't know everyone's backstory and where they're coming from. I'm only inappropriate with close friends, because I know for a fact I'm going to say some really insensitive shit if I let myself loose.
    ultracrepidarian thanked this post.

  2. #12

    The way I see it offensive humor is just a extension of of dark humor. Some people don't like dark humor because it reminds them of unpleasant things, while for some dark humor is a way to make a little bit of peace with the unpleasantries of life.

    Of course, to make light of a heavy subject it needs to be obvious to the listener that its not meant to be taken seriously. In other words it needs to be done in good taste otherwise it becomes too real. That's why offensive and dark humor is more socially daring/risky than other kinds of humor.
    Last edited by crazitaco; 06-23-2019 at 10:56 AM.

  3. #13

    I like Frankie Boyle because he touches on subjects that the pc folk won't, but he's taking it a bit too far more often than not.

    Then again, that's his signature style and I would pay to go see his stand up.

    I think intent is important, but one has to bear in mind, whether the recipient of a light-hearted insult is offended or not is entirely up to them. No-one can dictate how you react to sh*t. Calling someone a retard may be meaningless or even funny to you, but not to my friend, Anna, who happens to have a child born with Down's syndrome.

    I don't get why being a dick is so glorified in our society. Why is it so uncool to be kind instead? And I say this, whilst I'm calling my own friends cunts and use every incarnation of the word fuck imaginable.

    I get it, it's cool; we feel as if we're more badass when we use 'bad' words. Idk I guess I'm getting too old for this, I just want to see people be nice to each other for a change.
    napkineater thanked this post.

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  5. #14

    Quote Originally Posted by crazitaco View Post
    The way I see it offensive humor is just a extension of of dark humor. Some people don't like dark humor because it reminds them of unpleasant things, while for some dark humor is a way to make a little bit of peace with the unpleasantries of life.

    Of course, to make light of a heavy subject it needs to be obvious to the listener that its not meant to be taken seriously. In other words it needs to be done in good taste otherwise it becomes too real. That's why offensive and dark humor is more socially daring/risky than other kinds of humor.
    Bitch, well said.
    crazitaco thanked this post.

  6. #15

    There are certain comedians that do touch on sensitive topics but, it is a joke. Hence, why they are comedians. Now some of them like Kevin Hart does not tear down others in any way. Most of his standup is directed at his life and experiences. If you do not like a particular comedian or their standup do what I do...turn it off. Iliza Shlesinger is also one that may offend a lot of women but, she is direct and touches on many sensitive topics and does it from a different non sugar coated expression. One of my favs by her is

    crazitaco thanked this post.

  7. #16

    For some good female comedians, i recommend:

    and
    ENIGMA2019 thanked this post.

  8. #17

    I don't know a lot of female comedians, but the first one I think of is Margaret Cho, perhaps because she had a show when I was a kid and to me she's really the only real female comedian I can think of, at that time, to have a show? I'm probably forgetting, but she struck me as a comedian first.



    I mean, I guess she's offensive too.

    One thing that jumps out at me is self-deprecating humor. I feel like that helps to bring down audience defenses. You get defensive when you feel attacked or when you feel someone is attacking someone else, so if humor about typically 'offensive' topics where people often get attacked (such as sexuality, race, blah blah, probably socioeconomic class) is delivered in a way that's poking fun at one's own weaknesses, or even the audiences, I think it's sort of less 'offensive.'

    And then you can also get into topics like race and ethnicity, and presenting 'racist' things as ridiculous sort of leads towards making fun of those views, rather than trying to beat up people because of their race.

    Idk

    But I guess this could go here since I'm pretty sure someone would find Margaret Cho offensive, between the jokes about race and the nudity, just in this skit alone.

    Edit: I saw this interview where she talks a little bit about race and pc and people getting offended, who is racist. And I think she's joking, but I also think that self-deprecating humor that makes fun of one's own self in offensive ways does sort of force the audience to laugh at their own racism/sexism/etc. It shows it as ridiculous but not in an overly confrontational way like 'I know you have heard and perhaps made jokes about asian people eating dogs.' But it acknowledges that and also allows you to laugh about it, because ultimately it is a really ignorant way to look at other people, but we're all only human.

    Last edited by MeltedSorbet; 06-23-2019 at 09:04 PM.


     
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