Easily-angered, temperamental people: Low or high Fi?

Easily-angered, temperamental people: Low or high Fi?

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This is a discussion on Easily-angered, temperamental people: Low or high Fi? within the Cognitive Functions forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; I can see how a dominant Fi would mean the person is very in touch with their emotions and their ...

  1. #1

    Easily-angered, temperamental people: Low or high Fi?

    I can see how a dominant Fi would mean the person is very in touch with their emotions and their feelings are very important to them and therefore feelings can be easily hurt. But also, an inferior Fi would mean the person is less in touch with their emotions and therefore less able to control them.
    So for people whose feelings are easily hurt and are quick to react, are their overly-emotional tendencies due to having a high or low Fi? Or is it something else?



  2. #2
    INFJ - The Protectors

    I think it has more to do with having a fear of losing their loved ones, or being abandoned. You can read more about it here: https://www.erinpavlina.com/blog/200...-based-guides/

  3. #3

    Lol I remember when I used to think Fi meant that you're emotionally tormented and angry.
    Moo Rice, nep2une, Tyche and 2 others thanked this post.

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  5. #4
    Unknown


    More like high Neuroticism according to the Big Five model. Fi hardly has anything to do with it.

    Neuroticism
    Neuroticism is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression. It is sometimes called emotional instability, or is reversed and referred to as emotional stability. According to Eysenck's (1967) theory of personality, neuroticism is interlinked with low tolerance for stress or aversive stimuli. Neuroticism is a classic temperament trait that has been studied in temperament research for decades, before it was adapted by the FFM. Since main properties of temperament traits are stability in life time and its neurophysiological basis, the FFM researchers used these properties of Neuroticism to support their model. Those who score high in neuroticism are emotionally reactive and vulnerable to stress, they also tend to be flippant in the way they express emotion. They are more likely to interpret ordinary situations as threatening, and minor frustrations as hopelessly difficult. Their negative emotional reactions tend to persist for unusually long periods of time, which means they are often in a bad mood. For instance, neuroticism is connected to a pessimistic approach toward work, confidence that work impedes personal relationships, and apparent anxiety linked with work. Furthermore, those who score high on neuroticism may display more skin-conductance reactivity than those who score low on neuroticism. These problems in emotional regulation can diminish the ability of a person scoring high on neuroticism to think clearly, make decisions, and cope effectively with stress. Lacking contentment in one's life achievements can correlate with high neuroticism scores and increase one's likelihood of falling into clinical depression. Moreover, individuals high in neuroticism tend to experience more negative life events, but neuroticism also changes in response to positive and negative life experiences.

    At the other end of the scale, individuals who score low in neuroticism are less easily upset and are less emotionally reactive. They tend to be calm, emotionally stable, and free from persistent negative feelings. Freedom from negative feelings does not mean that low-scorers experience a lot of positive feelings.

    Neuroticism is similar but not identical to being neurotic in the Freudian sense (i.e., neurosis.) Some psychologists prefer to call neuroticism by the term emotional instability to differentiate it from the term neurotic in a career test.
    DOGSOUP, lifeinterminals, Jawz and 5 others thanked this post.

  6. #5

    I know easily angered people of all types... *rolls eyes at another thread attempting to link emotions to functions*
    MusiCago, OrangeAppled, heavydirtysoul and 2 others thanked this post.

  7. #6
    INFP


    Inferior Fi = fight like hell to never, ever, let anybody know what's going on inside.

    The notion that Te dominants are less able to control their emotions is absurd, this is one of their greatest assets.

    Its their 'thing'.
    MusiCago, Jawz, Notus Asphodelus and 3 others thanked this post.

  8. #7
    Unknown

    I agree this is best labelled as neuroticism. I am a Fe type raised by a two thinkers, and we were all like that, neuroticism is the best psychological descriptor of it that I have come across so far.
    MusiCago and Jawz thanked this post.

  9. #8
    INFJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Soul Kitchen View Post
    More like high Neuroticism according to the Big Five model. Fi hardly has anything to do with it.

    Neuroticism
    Neuroticism is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression. It is sometimes called emotional instability, or is reversed and referred to as emotional stability. According to Eysenck's (1967) theory of personality, neuroticism is interlinked with low tolerance for stress or aversive stimuli. Neuroticism is a classic temperament trait that has been studied in temperament research for decades, before it was adapted by the FFM. Since main properties of temperament traits are stability in life time and its neurophysiological basis, the FFM researchers used these properties of Neuroticism to support their model. Those who score high in neuroticism are emotionally reactive and vulnerable to stress, they also tend to be flippant in the way they express emotion. They are more likely to interpret ordinary situations as threatening, and minor frustrations as hopelessly difficult. Their negative emotional reactions tend to persist for unusually long periods of time, which means they are often in a bad mood. For instance, neuroticism is connected to a pessimistic approach toward work, confidence that work impedes personal relationships, and apparent anxiety linked with work. Furthermore, those who score high on neuroticism may display more skin-conductance reactivity than those who score low on neuroticism. These problems in emotional regulation can diminish the ability of a person scoring high on neuroticism to think clearly, make decisions, and cope effectively with stress. Lacking contentment in one's life achievements can correlate with high neuroticism scores and increase one's likelihood of falling into clinical depression. Moreover, individuals high in neuroticism tend to experience more negative life events, but neuroticism also changes in response to positive and negative life experiences.

    At the other end of the scale, individuals who score low in neuroticism are less easily upset and are less emotionally reactive. They tend to be calm, emotionally stable, and free from persistent negative feelings. Freedom from negative feelings does not mean that low-scorers experience a lot of positive feelings.

    Neuroticism is similar but not identical to being neurotic in the Freudian sense (i.e., neurosis.) Some psychologists prefer to call neuroticism by the term emotional instability to differentiate it from the term neurotic in a career test.
    Yeah, this. Fe user with high neuroticism here and I'm pretty easy to anger. I won't always show it but I'll definitely feel it.
    MusiCago thanked this post.

  10. #9

    Angriest people I've personally known are the two Ni-doms. I agree it seems to stem from neuroticism than any "function", and also... narcissism (even in small doses). And narcissism apparently stems from some traumatic childhood stuff, which makes your brain less masterful at regulating the feels. Need to research this one day.

    Keeping one's anger in check is really an admirable trait.

  11. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Kizuna View Post
    Angriest people I've personally known are the two Ni-doms. I agree it seems to stem from neuroticism than any "function", and also... narcissism (even in small doses). And narcissism apparently stems from some traumatic childhood stuff, which makes your brain less masterful at regulating the feels. Need to research this one day.

    Keeping one's anger in check is really an admirable trait.
    *grins* One of the angriest closet types I know is an INFJ...which, is 90% of the time self induced because, she bottles instead of actually, communicating like an adult and then explodes...


     
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