Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree? - Page 3

Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree?

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This is a discussion on Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree? within the Education & Career Talk forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Originally Posted by jamaix My son completed his BS in Business Administration at the end of April. He just turned ...

  1. #21

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post
    My son completed his BS in Business Administration at the end of April. He just turned 22 so in addition to being young he doesn't have much work experience. He has submitted numerous online applications daily for the past 6 weeks. This has only netted him 3 interviews. Two of which he decided were not right for him. Research indicated they were not good places to work and pay was based upon commission. The 3rd place he was very interested in, but they decided to go with a different candidate.

    What he is running into is everyone wants you to already have experience. Most of his experience is from summer jobs (fast food, laser engraving place, taxes/data entry). None of these jobs really relates to his degree. The tax/data entry place probably comes the closest, but still not really what he wants to do. He is more than willing to start at the bottom if there are opportunities to move up into, but he's not having much luck even being called for jobs that only require a high school education. Most of them still want 3 to 5 years experience.

    He's quite discouraged and a bit depressed right now. I keep telling him that someone will call and to not give up. But I wish I had something more concrete to offer him.

    Any thoughts, suggestions, ideas, about what he might be doing wrong or may need to do differently?




    ETA
    MY son would like to work in the banking industry and was told that perhaps he could start as a teller and then move up. He has applied for many teller positions and has not received a single call for an interview. When I was in the bank this past week I noticed a young teller, I asked him how he went about securing his position. He said he applied online.

    Found out he was 19 with only a high school education and they hired him. My son is 22 with previous cashier/customer service experience and a college degree and he can't even get an interview?
    Mid-level executive of a Fortune 500 here.

    The rule of thumb for college kids when breaking into the business world is this: if you don't have a job offer waiting for you by the time you graduate-- you're too late.

    The reason for this is because business is a soft major where school prestige, school ranking, internships, and networking weigh heavily on post-graduation placement so all the job searching legwork has to be completed strategically and prior to entering the real world. As a student, you have the opportunity (and advantage) of being an intern, but as a college graduate you're just another unemployed candidate in the eyes of the companies. Business isn't a hard major like engineering or programming where job placement is determined by technical expertise although those also require a certain level of networking and interning.

    With that said, I would consider the following:

    - Leveraging his college career office for leads, openings, and networks. College career offices have opportunities fed to the from alumni who prefer other alums which gives an advantage.
    - Industries outside of banking such as health care, technology, or retail to expand the pool of opportunities he's applying to. He can accumulate the experience he needs then lateral back into banking.
    - Positions in less desirable areas (rural, low population areas) have difficulty with attracting and retaining talent because no one wants to live there. If he's willing to bite the bullet, he can be competitive in markets where they have barely any applications for open positions.
    - Learning SQL and Excel. There are online classes that teach these high in demand skills and they'll jump out to companies on a resume. Business lives and dies on big data and data analytics, being able to draw insights from large data sets will position him well for any industry.
    - (Last resort given the cost, time, and effort) Attending graduate school (a 1-year program) and making sure he prepares better this time around.

    If you want me to review his resume (with his personal information removed) and give my feedback, feel free to reach out via private message.
    ninjahitsawall, jamaix and ponpiri thanked this post.

  2. #22

    The problem is that "entry level" and "work your way up" simply doesn't exist anymore. Employers aren't willing to train anymore. Everytime we hear "skills shortage", it really means "shortage of employers willing to train employees".

    I don't have any specific advice, just wanted to rant...

  3. #23

    Graduated about one and a half years ago now, but I guess that's still 'recent' in the grand scheme of things.

    First job I had wasn't very relevant to my degree but related to the part-time work I did while in college. So I had some experience already, and they hired me about a month after graduation. Second job was more relevant to my degree and semi relevant to the work I did previously. So to answer the question 'how' -- I'd say, the non-relevant-to-my-degree work did help me get a leg up. :)
    Last edited by Kitagawa Megumi; 07-05-2017 at 09:39 PM.
    ninjahitsawall and jamaix thanked this post.

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  5. #24

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post
    My son just got called to interview for a job at a local bank this next week. He is a bit discouraged about the pay offered, but understands that right now he just needs to get a job and begin accumulating some experience. He said, "well I guess I won't be moving out anytime soon." I am not at all concerned, he's a good kid and he can live at home as long as he needs to. I understand that he is just starting out and needs to gain experience. I told him that he has to pay his dues first before the better jobs open up to him.

    I think the starting pay is about $11 hr. He made $14.50 per hour last summer, but the job was production and really nothing to move up into.
    Hopefully your son got the job at the local bank. He should work anywhere and then keep learning new skills at whatever job he gets and at a local community college. Then if you gets an interview he should mention that he brings value to the team and that he is there to help make the team successful anyway he can. He has to make it known that he is willing to learn new skills on the job. He can always start at the bottom and work his way up the ladder. He will likely have more skills than a coworker that landed a job in their major straight out of college, plus he can continue climbing while there others stay at their current roles for a career.
    ninjahitsawall and jamaix thanked this post.

  6. #25

    Even though his summer jobs weren't related to the field he's interested in, there are still aspects of it that would be valuable to a banker, especially if he decides to start as a teller.

    The first thing I did was update my resume. Look at bank-related job descriptions and add the relevant keywords to his resume.

    The next thing I did was reach out to people in my department. They were able to give me a few local leads and suggestions for alternatives.

    What really did the trick was cold calling people via Linkedin. Online applications are largely a crock of poo. It's better to connect to a person if you know anyone. If you can't do this, go to LinkedIn or try to find direct email addresses from the company using sites like Jigsaw. They could have changed the name of the site. My first job came about by contacted global HR on LinkedIn and so was my 3rd and 4th (current) jobs.

    Be prepared to make sacrifices. I understand being picky when you have a specific dream. This worked out for me, but I also had to make sacrifices, like moving nearly across the country with little money and working extremely long hours for two years straight.

    He could also try applying for an apprenticeship or joining a school program that includes an internship at the end of the course.

    I know this is a month old, but if that marketing job is still on the table, I would take it. Social life is important for some, but being able to pay your bills is important for everybody.

    Good luck to all the recent grads out there.
    ninjahitsawall and jamaix thanked this post.

  7. #26

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post
    I'm wondering if I should encourage him to just resign himself to no life for the next couple of years.
    That is what I would suggest. Long hard hours are good for you so long as you are healthy, unattached, and in need of experience. I was able to acquire 4 years of experience in 2 because I took all the crap jobs/opportunities and worked all OT that was available to me. I was always intrinsically driven too, so it was an easy transition, but I don't regret a single moment of my youth that I gave up to be where I am now. I sometimes worked 100 hour weeks, and many 60+.

    Experience will also hone his direction : "I'll never do that kind of work again:, or "Man, I could see doing this for a while". Working a crap job made me go to and finish college, motivation I didn't have prior.

    In Banking tellers/customer service jobs, they are often 25-30 hours shifts in this area, so it's not very lucrative.
    ninjahitsawall and jamaix thanked this post.

  8. #27

    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Hopefully your son got the job at the local bank. He should work anywhere and then keep learning new skills at whatever job he gets and at a local community college.
     
    He did get the job. His first day of orientation was today. He's not thrilled with the job or the pay, but he understands that you have to start at the bottom and work your way up. The teller position they hired him for is a bit different than what he expected. It's a floating teller position, but at least it is full time. Plus, he found out that after 90 days they will pay 75% of his educational expenses as long as they are related to banking. So perhaps he'll be able to pursue a master's degree.



    Quote Originally Posted by ponpiri View Post
    Even though his summer jobs weren't related to the field he's interested in, there are still aspects of it that would be valuable to a banker, especially if he decides to start as a teller.
     
    I think his previous fast food cashier experience meant more to them than his college degree. However, he was upfront with them about his desire to advance beyond a teller position and they said we figured as much.

    Good luck to all the recent grads out there.
    Definitely it is hard to get someone to give you a chance when you don't have much experience.



    Quote Originally Posted by chad86tsi View Post
    That is what I would suggest. Long hard hours are good for you so long as you are healthy, unattached, and in need of experience.
     
    I agree. I think my son was reluctant to take the marketing position because it would have made it next to impossible for him to spend any time with his girlfriend who lives about 2 hours away. However, she is still in college too so it might be that he should have taken the marketing job, but it's too late now since he already accepted the floating teller position.

    In Banking tellers/customer service jobs, they are often 25-30 hours shifts in this area, so it's not very lucrative.
    Fortunately this one is 40 hours per week, but he will have to travel between banks. I told him to look at the positive side, he'll have more exposure than those who are located at the same branch all the time. He just turned 22 so he's got plenty of time to figure this all out.



    Thank you everyone for taking the time to share your experiences and suggestions!
    ponpiri and SoCalDave thanked this post.

  9. #28

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post

    Fortunately this one is 40 hours per week, but he will have to travel between banks. I told him to look at the positive side, he'll have more exposure than those who are located at the same branch all the time. He just turned 22 so he's got plenty of time to figure this all out.!
    That is perfect, the floater jobs allow for a lot of networking, getting into peoples minds as someone that can handle chaos and dynamic work flow. Those are traits he needs if he want's to move up. A steady never-goes-anywhere teller job = clock puncher / Widget maker type work, not much opportunity there. He will soon see how other managers and personal bankers operate and find his niche far more quickly in this floater role. He just needs to stay focused on being his best every day even when he's not vested in one location, people will notice that. I did a lot of electrical service work in banks, I've rewired about 350 of them over 7 years. I've seen a lot of banking from inside. Most teller are there to collect a paycheck, nothing else. It won't be hard to stand out if he treats this like opportunity, rather than a paycheck.
    jamaix and SoCalDave thanked this post.

  10. #29

    Plus college does not show you how to put it all together for a career in which you climb the ladder as far as your drive will take you. While at college you're exposed to theory, principles, research methods, setting priorities, and other things. However, you don't get "this is how you put it all together so you can advance from the janitor all the way to manager, project manager, principal in my case, or whatever the case may be. He should have a good return on investment if he keeps a positive attitude and the end goal in mind.
    jamaix thanked this post.

  11. #30

    Tell him to call up his University's career services.

    MOST careers now are found through networking. His University will more than likely hook him up with alumni that are working in banking. He should contact them for information sessions asking questions about their companies and banking in general. You'll be surprised how many times that leads to "hey, send me your resume!"

    Another option is using linkedin.com/alumni
    jamaix thanked this post.


     
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