Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree? - Page 4

Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree?

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This is a discussion on Recent college grads w/little exp., how did you find a job related to your degree? within the Education & Career Talk forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Update: Gonna add some more information just in case it helps someone else see that it can get better. I ...

  1. #31

    Update: Gonna add some more information just in case it helps someone else see that it can get better.

    I know it is definitely discouraging when you are first entering the job market. To say my son was depressed about employment opportunities just 2 years ago is a major understatement. A little less than two years ago he was a bank teller working 36 hours a week earning $11.75 per hour.

    He ended up working as a teller for about 4 1/2 months. As a 4 year college graduate with loans to pay a teller position was definitely not what he hoped for. Fortunately after getting a few months work experience as a teller he was able to get another company to give him an opportunity.

    In November of 2017 he started a new job paying $14.50 per hour plus bonuses. Which was equal to about $40,000 per year. Approximately 6 weeks ago he was offered a new salaried position with the same company and will now earn about $53,000 per year. While he definitely would like to earn more, that's not bad for someone who just turned 24 a month ago.
    Last edited by jamaix; 06-26-2019 at 10:30 AM.
    angelfish, ninjahitsawall, NiTech and 3 others thanked this post.

  2. #32

    Right or wrong I tend to view business as a high risk, high reward career path. Having graduated from a BS/MS dual-degree program in computer science I started off with a higher salary than most MBAs, but they have far more earning potential if they can climb the corporate ladder. Personally, I'm just not that competitive.

    I'm glad to read your son's career prospects are looking up.

  3. #33

    It depends on your degree? I did a lot of volunteer work with children, elderly and prisoners when I was working at shit jobs and focusing on other things. Later I was able to put on my resume that I had done a lot of environmental and child centered work as a volunteer.

    That's why colleges want you to be well rounded and join clubs or have part time jobs because they know you can put these things on your resume.

    I admit I went to an excellent school I felt insanely privileged to be accepted to. I would not have been accepted there as a high school senior. I got accepted because a magna cum laude associates degree in general natural sciences from a community college combined with recommendations from my volunteer supervisors. I'm not saying it because I'm a narcissist I'm saying it still in minor shock I pulled this off the long way.

    I say it with gratitude for my education too. Where you get your degree and what you did to get it factors in to who hires you. One of the accomplishments of my life is writing curriculum for students in Northern California. But looking at older kids now I see playing conservation games and going on nature walks with kids was and is just as important to the future of the world.

    So my advice is: volunteer work, community college to get into a better school, alternative outlets (I knew I liked to write I never knew I would help write elementary school science curriculum) and perspective, like I got about doing nature walks with kids. It feels like hanging out and maybe not being appreciated but you have no idea who one of those children might be partly because of you at sixteen or twenty.

    So I guess that's also advice to teach because our country always needs teachers. I hate the public school system tho.

    I dunno. I'm going to grad school. Some people should also consider that. If you have a vision or a plan especially because drifting through academia with no purpose will just get you deeper in debt. I never thought I'd go to grad school then I had An Idea Whose Time Has Come.

    Funny for an ISFP who worked with my body until I was 30-35ish. But one day the world just opened up. I'm very lucky. I also mostly get by as a minimalist with gig type jobs. It's an option.
    jamaix thanked this post.

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  5. #34

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post
    Update: Gonna add some more information just in case it helps someone else see that it can get better.

    I know it is definitely discouraging when you are first entering the job market. To say my son was depressed about employment opportunities just 2 years ago is a major understatement. A little less than two years ago he was a bank teller working 36 hours a week earning $11.75 per hour.

    He ended up working as a teller for about 4 1/2 months. As a 4 year college graduate with loans to pay a teller position was definitely not what he hoped for. Fortunately after getting a few months work experience as a teller he was able to get another company to give him an opportunity.

    In November of 2017 he started a new job paying $14.50 per hour plus bonuses. Which was equal to about $40,000 per year. Approximately 6 weeks ago he was offered a new salaried position with the same company and will now earn about $53,000 per year. While he definitely would like to earn more, that's not bad for someone who just turned 24 a month ago.

    I guess? If all you care about is money. I don't see anything impressive about fifty grand a year at 24 if it doesn't give you personal satisfaction or spiritual growth or individual freedom. A STRIPPER can make more than that at 24.

    Im disturbed if earning potential is the only way you messure your son and may he run like hell away from you.

  6. #35

    @jamaix I got my current job through networking, and it's exactly the job that I dreamt of having while I was doing my degree. I can't stress enough the importance of networking in the corporate world.
    jamaix thanked this post.

  7. #36

    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Nymph View Post
    I guess? If all you care about is money. I don't see anything impressive about fifty grand a year at 24 if it doesn't give you personal satisfaction or spiritual growth or individual freedom. A STRIPPER can make more than that at 24.

    Im disturbed if earning potential is the only way you messure your son and may he run like hell away from you.
    He is doing something he enjoys. Plus, he has some pretty hefty college loans that he has to pay off so earning enough to do so was important.

    We live in a rust belt state with one of the lowest cost of living expense. That also means wages tend to be much lower here than in states like New York, California, etc. So that is important to consider. His wife is also 24 and she is a registered nurse and her wages are also lower than the national average. (I think she earns 24 to 25 per hour and she works at a research hospital) However, the lower wages paid in our state are offset by the fact that this is one of the cheapest states to live in.

    My son and DIL law both love their jobs. My son talks about his work all the time.


    ETA You don't know me at all. So I'm not sure why you are making the type comments you have made about running the hell away from me. I made this thread because son was extremely despressed at the time and I didn't know how to help him. He was very discouraged about the pay he was receiving. I would love him whether even if he worked the rest his life at a Wendy's flipping burgers. But I wanted him to be happy and making $11 an hour was not doing that.
    ninjahitsawall, NiTech, Blue Ribbon and 2 others thanked this post.

  8. #37

    Quote Originally Posted by jamaix View Post
    He is doing something he enjoys. Plus, he has some pretty hefty college loans that he has to pay off so earning enough to do so was important.

    We live in a rust belt state with one of the lowest cost of living expense. That also means wages tend to be much lower here than in states like New York, California, etc. So that is important to consider. His wife is also 24 and she is a registered nurse and her wages are also lower than the national average. (I think she earns 24 to 25 per hour and she works at a research hospital) However, the lower wages paid in our state are offset by the fact that this is one of the cheapest states to live in.

    My son and DIL law both love their jobs. My son talks about his work all the time.


    ETA You don't know me at all. So I'm not sure why you are making the type comments you have made about running the hell away from me. I made this thread because son was extremely despressed at the time and I didn't know how to help him. He was very discouraged about the pay he was receiving. I would love him whether even if he worked the rest his life at a Wendy's flipping burgers. But I wanted him to be happy and making $11 an hour was not doing that.
    Some people aren't happy if they aren't knocking others over to make them selves feel taller. Virtue signaling is a tell-tale sign.

    I think it's important to realize some are fulfilled by work and others are not. As an INFP, most of my fulfilling interests don't pay well or are inherently unstable vocations. I realized early in life that being fulfilled with work meant being poor. I don't find being poor fulfilling, and it's very limiting. I made the conscious choice to sustain my finances with gainful satisfying work, and find fulfillment elsewhere (hobbies). I now get to have it all, wealth and fulfillment. The earnings allow plenty of resources and time to do what I find fulfilling thanks to the lifestyle my job affords me. Life isn't just about getting a dream job for some, sometimes it's about getting a dream lifestyle, and a suitable job to support it.

    My wife is a very different type, and her work is very fulfilling to her, and reasonably lucrative. Not all of us can have this balance, and there is nothing immoral or shameful about that fact.

    There is more than one correct answer when it comes to deciding how to structure one's career and financial future as it relates to personal fulfillment and having a good presence in this world.

    If your son is happy and financially stable, he's "winning" at the game of life. He's also lucky to have a parent that cares enough to research and advocate for him long after he's moved out on his own.
    jamaix thanked this post.

  9. #38

    Quote Originally Posted by chad86tsi View Post
    Some people aren't happy if they aren't knocking others over to make them selves feel taller. Virtue signaling is a tell-tale sign.
    sad but true.

    I think it's important to realize some are fulfilled by work and others are not. As an INFP, most of my fulfilling interests don't pay well or are inherently unstable vocations. I realized early in life that being fulfilled with work meant being poor. I don't find being poor fulfilling, and it's very limiting. I made the conscious choice to sustain my finances with gainful satisfying work, and find fulfillment elsewhere (hobbies). I now get to have it all, wealth and fulfillment. The earnings allow plenty of resources and time to do what I find fulfilling thanks to the lifestyle my job affords me. Life isn't just about getting a dream job for some, sometimes it's about getting a dream lifestyle, and a suitable job to support it.
    My son is an ESTP and his wife is an ENFP. They are night and day different in their personalities. They seem to compliment each other well. What you've said makes a lot of sense. It is hard to be happy when you struggle to put food on the table and keep a roof over your head.

    My wife is a very different type, and her work is very fulfilling to her, and reasonably lucrative. Not all of us can have this balance, and there is nothing immoral or shameful about that fact.

    There is more than one correct answer when it comes to deciding how to structure one's career and financial future as it relates to personal fulfillment and having a good presence in this world.

    If your son is happy and financially stable, he's "winning" at the game of life. He's also lucky to have a parent that cares enough to research and advocate for him long after he's moved out on his own.
    Actually at the time I first did this thread he was a recent college grad still living at home. (which was fine with his dad and I, we were not pushing him to move out) He was dating (his wife) at the time and they wanted to get married, but the money for doing so was not there. She wanted to go ahead and just do it as soon as she graduated from college and figure it out on the fly. He was not comfortable with that idea as he was looking at the dollars and cents and telling her the money to do so was not there.

    His fiancee was driving a beat up jalopy on its last leg and desperately needed better transportation. The car was so bad it worried him that she was driving around in it with her two young children (2 & 3 at the time) They both had college loans to pay. Although as a single mother of two very young children she did receive some financial aid that helped pay for most of hers. So her loans are a lot smaller than his. But between them they were going to be paying about $1,000 a month in student loans. Plus, she receives no child support for the two young children as their biological dad has failed to pay even a cent of support to this day.

    This was a very discouraging and depressing situation to my son as his fiancee lived 2 hours away with her parents and he wanted to move her and her two kids closer (another detail I did not supply in the original OP). I did not supply all the details in my original post as it did not occur to me that I would be accused of being a bad parent who only cared about how much my son earned. He was very depressed because he wanted to get married, he wanted to be able to pay his loans, he wanted to be able to see that they would have enough money to feed and provide shelter for the 4 of them. We were going to let them live with us for a time if need be, but we knew it would not be an ideal situation for them or us. Fortunately, she graduated and was able to get a job near my son and he also got a better job as I detailed above. I was thrilled for them because it meant they could do what they desperately wanted to do.

    They've been married about a year and half now and in that time they've had another child, bought a house and his wife is back in school working on her masters. (will be a nurse practitioner when she graduates) My son plans to go back and get his MBA after his wife completes her schooling. She is currently working full time, going to college full time, and has 3 kids 4 and under. I think what they have accomplished in a year and a half is amazing and I am impressed and glad that they are happy!


    BTW thanks for your very nice post!
    angelfish, ai.tran.75, Blue Ribbon and 2 others thanked this post.

  10. #39

    Also gonna add an update here (my first response is on p. 1 haha). I relocated from NYC to Denver metro and that was a HUGE improvement in terms of job/overall career prospects. Granted, I moved for my Master's program, but part of the reason I chose it in the first place was location... including personality, for example because I just could never get a handle on the "networking" thing in NY. It just happens more organically now (that is the case on a personal level as well). There is less of an image culture, of having to "sell yourself" and all that... in my experience. All the stuff I always struggled with because it seemed so phony, and almost deceptive at times.

    Yes, there is still competition and you still have to work for something when you want it. And large metros in general are probably not ideal for me but I think Denver is ranked like #2 best place to live in the US (US News anyway)? A lot of that has to do with the economy; I just hope it doesn't get overridden by population growth and end up in the same vicious cycle of overcrowding, job saturation, and 0 disposable income that I have wanted out of my entire child and adult life. lol.
    jamaix thanked this post.

  11. #40

    You have to use the power of nepotism. That's how I'm getting my foot in the door.
    Gossip Goat thanked this post.


     
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