"Unschooling" - does anyone have direct experience they'd share?

"Unschooling" - does anyone have direct experience they'd share?

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This is a discussion on "Unschooling" - does anyone have direct experience they'd share? within the Education & Career Talk forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; I came across this article about "unschooling". Unschooling: The Case for Setting Your Kids Into the Wild | Nature | ...

  1. #1

    "Unschooling" - does anyone have direct experience they'd share?

    I came across this article about "unschooling".
    Unschooling: The Case for Setting Your Kids Into the Wild | Nature | OutsideOnline.com

    If this term is new to you, the jist is that kids learn better through life experiences rather than very structured, mandatory schooling.

    Has anyone here been "unschooled"? Parents of unschoolers?

    I'd love to hear about your experience. Things like a typical day, whether unschooling was enjoyable, useful, a deterrent in any particular way.

    Please chime in!



  2. #2

    Maybe it's an american thing, but I can't understand this kind of stuff at all.
    but, if they want to revert back to an "education" that was given in the dark ages, they can go ahead. I also hear somalia is good for unschooling. self-reliance. no NWO, fascist, police state, taking our freedom, government. no compulsory education. sounds like a great place to live eh....oh...wait...
    honestly it's getting pretty far fetched that in some countries the parents would sacrifice so much for their kids to be able to read and write (something wandering out in nature can't teach you.), and here we have one of the most prosperous countries in the world, trying to go the other way. i'm dumbfounded
    Last edited by Sman; 08-20-2014 at 02:22 AM.

  3. #3

    I think there's something to be said for learning by experience. I think we need both kinds of learning. There's an over-reliance on "classroom education" (aka, schooling) in the more developed nations. This kind of learning is valuable no doubt - but it's definitely not the only way people learn and it's not the key to all things holy, or the one path to achieve happiness, or anything like that. Those who believe that seem to be over-relying on it. Quite simply, there needs to be balance - we shouldn't emphasize one type of learning and forget the other. They can and should both be incorporated into our lives if we want to live balanced, whole lives.

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  5. #4

    Educations systems have their flaws and not every kid is going to adapt to it, but then school life is part of life experience, and by taking it away we are taking the socializing and growing with other kids away.

    Also, wouldn't it be possible for kids to have outdoor learning experiences too if the parents take them out for family trips and activities every now and then? School time is freer and there are more vaccations too.

    2 hours of learning per month is too few, are the kids only getting the basics of the basics?? Perhaps it could be complemented with books being available to them at least for them to acquire the knowledge they are interested in, or else it sounds like they are kind of isolated from humanity.

  6. #5

    We homeschooled and were familiar with unschooling, as a movement, but we didn't really embrace it like some have.

    I think it is important for parents to interact with their children where they are at and in whatever areas the child displays interest. Properly done, this is unschooling and it can drive a lot of learning. However, there are some areas of education that will have to be taught that don't (at least initially) excite the child's interest.

  7. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by niss View Post
    We homeschooled and were familiar with unschooling, as a movement, but we didn't really embrace it like some have.

    I think it is important for parents to interact with their children where they are at and in whatever areas the child displays interest. Properly done, this is unschooling and it can drive a lot of learning. However, there are some areas of education that will have to be taught that don't (at least initially) excite the child's interest.
    I've only seen "unschooling" be labeled and come out as a movement over the last few years. I was homeschooled 'til 10th grade, and while reading up on "unschooling", realized that my parents sorta used a combo of what would be considered unschooling along with the usual curriculum. ...there was no such term then - everyone I knew who was homeschooled (had parents who) adapted whatever worked the best.

    @AriesLilith, I'm as curious as to whether a few hours a month is enough formal education to work long-term. As far as socialization, it wasn't an issue while I was homeschooled. I was in local homeschool groups for stuff like field trips & lab classes, and had much more time to pursue other interests through lessons & clubs. I segued easily into public school. (As a little kid, it used to drive me nuts when adults would see me out during school hours and ask my mom, "But what about socialization!?" ;-) Hands down the most expressed question/opinion.) But I wasn't an "unschooler". So I don't know. Hopefully someone will tell me. :-P

    Thanks, you guys, for responding - I appreciate the dialogue.
    niss, niss, AriesLilith and 28 others thanked this post.

  8. #7

    I feel like regular school almost gives you an unrealistic view of socialization. You get put with the exact same age group and the exact same kids, usually in a very narrow socio-econmic and cultural band, every day. Once you're an adult in the workforce you're dealing with people of different ages and different backgrounds a lot more often. I think a homeschool family who puts their child in outside activities and groups and brings them around on trips and learning experiences is probably giving them more accurate exposure to socialization in "real life".

    As for unschooling-- I wouldn't do it. I do plan on homeschooling my children if we decide to have children, but I agree with everyone who's spoken so far when they say what works best for most children is a mixture of the traditional classroom learning with the experiential. One of the benefits of homeschool is that it allows you to balance those aspects better. Traditional schooling it too far to one side and unschooling is way, way too far to the other. The rare child may thrive on very little structure in their learning, but all need guidance to learn. Even in what we would consider "primitive" cultures children were still taken and taught how to hunt, fight, forage, cook, prepare skins, etc. Never did we just throw children out into the world say "ok, figure out what you need to know". The fact that we systematically teach our children what we know in order to allow them to start their own development of knowledge from a higher point than the generation before is what has allowed our species to advance so far over our existence.
    AriesLilith, AriesLilith, AriesLilith and 13 others thanked this post.


     

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