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This is a discussion on Guess It's Time to Face Reality within the Education & Career Talk forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; @ Scarlet Eyes As @ Gore Motel mentioned, none of what you have listed are in demand and, as I ...

  1. #11

    @Scarlet Eyes

    As @Gore Motel mentioned, none of what you have listed are in demand and, as I said elsewhere, everyone and their dog has a psychology degree. There are three people in my immediate family who have one and don't use it. People take psychology because it's an easy major.

    I find it odd that so many people pick degrees that won't net them much of anything. Artists are starving, psychology degrees are a dime a dozen, I only know two people with political science degrees who have a job in that field out of fifteen or so, and I only know one person with a job who has an anthropology degree and that is only because he went to law school afterwards.

    If you were going to going to do fashion, you should already have a portfolio at this time unless you want to take the long route. Even though I have recently told a person to go into fashion design, I wouldn't suggest it for you unless you have experience in sewing and construction already or are ready and willing to learn quickly. He already has design experience and perquisites and a knack for it. I am unsure about you. I also have connections in the industry and can have him placed.

    As for your mention of lawyering, I would also suggest against it as the market is flooded with people with expensive law degrees and few positions to be had. I also wouldn't suggest economics. It's a harsh field where the vast majority of people are incompetent and have no idea how things work. The curriculum is wrong in most cases and you'll probably never get job anywhere near your level of education.

    You can either do it here or PM me, but I want you to list for me what you are good at and what skill sets you have. I'd also like you to list what you will absolutely not do along with what you want to do other than those four things listed above. At least at that point, things can be narrowed down.

    I have no problem offering career advice to people are willing to listen, but you have to be realistic about it. I also have experience in a lot of different fields, so I can offer realistic, non-sugar coated advice and perspectives on the areas in question.
    Carpentet810, chanteuse, with water and 2 others thanked this post.

  2. #12

    Quote Originally Posted by SiFan View Post
    Of the areas mentioned, probably anthropology. Everyone figures he/she is a psychologist (which is kind of true); but, not just anyone is an anthropologist!

    By the way, since you are INTJ, why no science-type choices, like biology or electrical engineering?
    Yes, I have heard from several sources that psychology is a popular major. A bit too popular, in fact. And apparently, it's hard to become a fully-fledged psychologist unless if you have a doctorate's degree. Also, there really isn't much career options if you only have a Bachelor's in the field. :/

    Well, I may be in the minority, but I was never really intrigued by science. Science is just a means to an end for universal progress. But that's only my opinion.

    (Although, I do hold a small interest towards cosmology and geology. Plus a bit of electrical engineering, but it's all thanks to Nikola Tesla for getting me interested in the subject. )

  3. #13

    I only figured out which career paths I want to take after I graduated from college, so don't feel too behind if you don't know what to do yet. I'd encourage you to explore different fields and career paths in the first one or two years of college if that's something you can afford to do. Take advantage of career exploration opportunities and lecture events offered at your school and nearby. You can also take online classes for free on sites like Coursera. I find them helpful because there's no need to commit if you don't find the material engaging or if you get too busy. You can sample many different subjects this way. Jobs and internships are also a great way to learn about yourself and what you're suited for.

    Regarding specific subjects, I majored in economics, so I'll just comment on that.

    To begin with, economics =/= business or finance.

    Some of this depends on the school, but an economics major focuses more broadly on theory about things like interest rates, how economies develop, and government regulation of the economy. You're not necessarily going to learn things like accounting, investing, business strategy, etc. from your required courses alone.

    Regarding career prospects outside of academia, I attended a "freshwater" school that emphasizes mathematical modelling and quantitative analysis. This is fine (or great, depending on the prestige of the degree) if you want to go into business, finance, or want to work at a regulatory agency. But you might just as well major in math and/or statistics and take economics courses on the side, in my view.

    I personally don't see the point of studying economics at a school that 1. isn't well-respected in the field or 2. has little to no focus on quantitative methods (applying math, statistics, and computer programming). Why? A big chunk of economics are simply competing sets of theories. The goal of these theories is to explain the very very complex and highly unpredictable mess that is human behavior on a large scale, which, of course, you can't control in a lab. It's much more difficult to come up with "hard facts" about economies and economic behavior as it is to come up with facts about, say, mouse genes or chemical bonding. So you can expect a fair amount of self-serving bullshit in the literature and in current discourse.

    Don't go into college assuming professors are gods that know everything there is to know about their respective fields. It might be they stopped keeping up with the field years ago and are just rehashing old findings. They were probably socialized to be more receptive to certain types of views. They might be using outdated research methods. They might want to indoctrinate you with certain views, or be very resistant to others. Learning quantitative methods hedges against these risks. Plus, it's increasingly a STEM world and there are more opportunities out there for people who have these skills vs. those who don't.

    Like others have said, your undergraduate major doesn't have to determine what you eventually end up doing. I know of somebody who majored in Anthropology and now works at an advertising firm. I know of people who majored in Sociology who got jobs at a talent recruiting agency, an advertising firm, a tech start-up, and a local government agency. Note, these former Sociology majors had marketable skills like programming, graphic design, academic research, etc. I'd assume they'd had relevant work experience, as well.

    Anyway, make sure you major in something that'll either get you hired with high probability and/or something you can do well in. There's no point being a pre-law with poor grades. Some people say what you learn in college doesn't really matter at all since you're likely to forget much of it, and that's true for many cases. In a sense, going to college and graduating is just a way of hinting to employers that you're smart, hard-working, and persistent. Good grades shows that even more.
    chanteuse and Scarlet Eyes thanked this post.

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  5. #14

    @Doktorin Zylinder I'll make sure to PM you about my specific strengths and skills sometime this week. Tomorrow evening at the earliest.

  6. #15

    @Scarlet Eyes

    You will find that you don't actually have to declare a major right away. There are "general core" courses that every college student has to take, and you might as well knock those out while you look over your options. I changed my major 3 times before I graduated.
    chanteuse and Scarlet Eyes thanked this post.

  7. #16

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet Eyes View Post
    Yes, I have heard from several sources that psychology is a popular major. A bit too popular, in fact.
    Yes; noticed that.

    And apparently, it's hard to become a fully-fledged psychologist unless if you have a doctorate's degree. Also, there really isn't much career options if you only have a Bachelor's in the field.
    True, as far as careers 'doing psychology' go. There are some, though, such as educational testing, counseling, social work, human resources, ... . It's not like you couldn't compete and obtain a good psychology-oriented position.

    Or, you could ace-out undergrad psy, win a graduate scholarhip, and end up as a practicing phd Psychologist.

    Of course, many opportunities are open to someone with a college degree irrespective of major.

    Well, I may be in the minority, but I was never really intrigued by science. Science is just a means to an end for universal progress. But that's only my opinion.
    Really kind of a plus. Shows you're a well balanced INTJ.

    (Although, I do hold a small interest towards cosmology and geology. Plus a bit of electrical engineering, but it's all thanks to Nikola Tesla for getting me interested in the subject. )
    Guess you know that, if you're looking for a major that will nearly guarantee a choice of related jobs, either geology or electrical engineering is a good bet. But, that's not the only thing to consider about a major. (Does your university offer a degree in Cosmology?)
    Scarlet Eyes thanked this post.

  8. #17

    Don't go to school. Don't feed into the system. Sounds like hokey hippie stuff, but I'm 100% serious. It is a waste of time and money.

  9. #18

    As an Anthropology major who went on to grad school and eventually a lucrative career it's a flexible major that allows you many career paths and interesting course content.

    HOWEVER (and this is huge ...), you need to go to grad school. You can take the anthropology degree to business school (what I did), law school (almost applied), medical school (I was accepted here), etc. but you can't survive out in the work force with just that degree alone. If you want to be a practicing anthropologist you need to pursue a PhD (1-2 spots in the top 5 programs) which requires a perfect GPA, tons of research, and a prestigious undergraduate institution.

    I was pre-med at a very competitive undergrad university and anthropology was the easiest major to get a 3.9 GPA in because the upper division classes weren't jammed with engineers and other pre-med kids. It was a stepping stone, but it's not a final destination.

    Same advice applies to Psych and Poli Sci.
    Scarlet Eyes thanked this post.

  10. #19

    Quote Originally Posted by Cagnazzo View Post
    Don't go to school. Don't feed into the system. Sounds like hokey hippie stuff, but I'm 100% serious. It is a waste of time and money.
    Is this coming from personal experience?

  11. #20

    You don't have to decide on a major right away. And even if you do end up selecting a major right away, you're not obliged to stay in that major. I used to be a computer engineering major, and once I realized that I couldn't will myself to like programming (I absolutely hated programming), I decided to switch to mechanical engineering.

    And speaking of not being able to will oneself through a class, while job availability is important, it is also important to consider whether you can motivate yourself to get through that major. Every major is going to have at least one class that will test your mettle. For my current major (MechE), that class was dynamics. If I wasn't hell-bent on getting a MechE degree I would've quit right there and right then.


     
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