[ENTP] Nonfiction Book Recommendations

Nonfiction Book Recommendations

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This is a discussion on Nonfiction Book Recommendations within the ENTP Forum- The Visionaries forums, part of the NT's Temperament Forum- The Intellects category; Let me try again. I like reading Nonfiction, particularly the kind that is educational. Particularly the kind that educates and ...

  1. #1
    Unknown Personality

    Nonfiction Book Recommendations

    Let me try again. I like reading Nonfiction, particularly the kind that is educational. Particularly the kind that educates and gives insight into people, society, geopolitics, etc.
    some examples.

    Guns, Germs, and Steel
    Redefining Reality (The Great Courses)
    Sapiens
    Predictably Irrational
    Prisoners of Geography
    9 Presidents who Screwed up America (and 4 who tried to save her)
    How We Got to Now: Six Inventions that made the modern world

    to put it another way, the kind of nonfiction books that aren't "self-help" and aren't flat history. but are more like, commentaries.
    I enjoy reading intelligent people's opinions on various subjects. especially complex ones and ones relevant to daily life. sometimes there are good choices on the NYT bestseller list. but i don't want to miss anything. :)

    edit: alternative histories are fun too. they require deep thinking and analysis.
    Last edited by grandpa2390; 02-09-2019 at 01:44 PM.
    italix, desire machine and Violet Heart thanked this post.



  2. #2

    Antifragile-things that gain from disorder

    Sent from my LM-V350 using Tapatalk

  3. #3

    Beating back the devil, by Maryn McKenna. Good book on emerging diseases and the people who combated them.
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  5. #4

    Earnest Becker's The Denial of Death, it's a non-fiction psychoanalysis book.

    Although I'm only a third of a way through it, I can easily say it has shaken me to my core. Every single page is a blessing, it is utterly unputdownable.
    grandpa2390 thanked this post.

  6. #5
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    I don't know if this is for you personally, but I just find people and the differences among them really interesting. Obviously, that's why I'm here. So I like to read about the extreme outliers. I read a lot of books about serial killers and cults. I want to know what it takes to get a person to that place. Or what keeps them there.

    Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape by Jenna Hill Miscavige (reading now)

    Breaking Free: How I Escaped My Father-Warren Jeffs-Polygamy, and the FLDS Cult by Rachel Jeffs (my favorite of the 3)

    Zodiac by Robert Graysmith

    Interest in non-fiction is a fairly recent development for me. I used to stick to fiction only, probably because I was in school and didn't have a desire to read for learning on my own time.
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  7. #6
    Unknown Personality

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet_Heart View Post
    Interest in non-fiction is a fairly recent development for me. I used to stick to fiction only, probably because I was in school and didn't have a desire to read for learning on my own time.
    I go back in forth. it depends on what I'm in the mood for. I like to read fiction, but in some ways, it gives me a similar kind of guilt that watching tv does. For nonfiction, I'm not interested in learning facts for the sake of learning facts. you know? I have no interest in being a Civil War buff. for example. I like the kinds of nonfiction that have the potential to change me for the better. like pokemon evolving into a better pokemon or something. its content might contain either profound insight from the author or just the content itself might be enough to change the way I think, the way I see the world. I don't want to be stagnant. :)

    But it can be hard to find good books. To find good nonfiction books that not only resonate with vibration of mind/heart/soul in order to break it out of stagnation, but are about a subject matter, and written well enough, so that I am transfixed and cannot put the book down, even while it is destroying my belief system, currently held views, whatever. :)

    I went through my library and pretty much picked out the best ones that I could remember.

    “If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

    I like this quote. I want to be the kind of person this quote describes. The Bible describes the content and depth of that content of some material as milk and other as meat. I want to be one who eats meat.
    Now if you're unfamiliar with the verses, I'm sure you realize the difference here is not vegetarian vs carnivore, but baby food vs adult food. I'm sure you figured that out on your own, but not knowing you, and not seeing your face when you read what I say, I have to throw in a disclaimer to prevent misunderstandings just in case. :)

    edit: I also like these kinds of podcasts. "You Are Not So Smart" has good stuff. "The TED radio hour". Dan Carlin's Hardcore History. He also used to do a podcast titled Common Sense. that was pretty much my first foray into this type of educational material outside of religion. Everything before that was stuff that came on tv or was assigned by teachers. But he stopped doing Common Sense despite how awesome the show was because it just became hopeless. In his words, he's run out of things to say except what he's already said before and doing the show was just getting depressing. Now he just does his history show which is still awesome.
    Last edited by grandpa2390; 02-11-2019 at 03:19 PM.

  8. #7
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    I go in waves of both reading and what I like to read. I go through times when I am all about fiction and others when I am really enjoying non-fiction. I work full time, commute by car, am the Leader of my daughter's Girl Scout troop, am involved in a local woman's club and am the director of our district for the federation of woman's clubs on top of dealing with my kid's schedules and activities so I really have very little time to read. It becomes a choice between getting a chance to catch up on TV I have recorded or planned to watch (usually with my husband) or reading. I used to listen to books when I was driving to and from work but now I tend to listen to podcasts instead. I have a job that requires me to write and concentrate so I can't listen to audiobooks or podcasts much at work.

    I am reading a book on the National Parks right now. It is not really a history of the Parks but sort of an extended guidebook which goes into each park, describes the history, and give tips and ideas about what to see and other insider type stuff.

    I really like the Ron Chernow historical biographies. I read (and also listened to) the Alexander Hamilton one, i.e. the one that inspired Lin Manuel Miranda to write Hamilton: An American Musical. I started listening to the Washington one but ended up having to return it to the Library borrowing before I was done and need to re-get it. I hear his Grant one is his best.

    @Scarlet_Heart I have been meaning to read the Scientology book too. I have been watching Leah Remini's show and it is amazing to me how much of a "cult" it is. Actually, she did an episode with former Jehovah Witness members and it was interesting how there was similarities in how they controlled the minds of their members too. Both use isolation, control of the media/information they are exposed to, and threaten separation from their families if they leave. The big difference between a religion and a cult is that isolation. People don't know they are being brainwashed because their doctrine tells them that they should be punished or are bad members if they seek outside information. Many, like Jenna, grew up in it so it did not seem odd to be shipped away to a ranch and barely see your parents. They just knew their parents were doing good work for the church and that was what was important. Leah said herself that the issue is, even with law enforcement involvement, brainwashed people of the church most likely will not want to be "rescued", even if they dislike what Miscaviage is doing because they believe L Ron Hubbard will be reincarnated and come back so they should continue to "clear" society.

  9. #8
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    Quote Originally Posted by grandpa2390 View Post
    But it can be hard to find good books. To find good nonfiction books that not only resonate with vibration of mind/heart/soul in order to break it out of stagnation, but are about a subject matter, and written well enough, so that I am transfixed and cannot put the book down, even while it is destroying my belief system, currently held views, whatever. :)
    A side note, I was getting information to someone about getting the Girl Scout Gold Award (the Eagle equivalent in GS) and I thought this was a very interesting thing included in the "Investigate the community issue you are proposing to address" section of the requirements. It says:

    "Demonstrate courage as you investigate your issue, knowing that what you learn may challenge your own and others’ beliefs."

    Nice idea for making well rounded people. Stepping out of your comfort zone and questioning your beliefs should be something everyone should strive for. I know it is something that keeps the ENTP motor running.
    grandpa2390 thanked this post.

  10. #9
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    @Geonerd I watched the first two seasons and got sucked in really quickly. Then I checked "Dianetics" out from the library but couldn't get through it because it was barely coherent. It was awful. I don't have cable so I'll have to wait for S3 to show up on Hulu. It is amazing. I've read a lot about different cults and I understand how the cult is structured to exploit, isolate, and threaten its people. What I don't understand is the inability of the low level people to recognize it and see it for what it is. Or deep down they do, but the denial is so hardcore.

    One thing that I found amazing about Rachel Jeffs is that (if you believe her) she was skeptical since childhood and she actively rebelled throughout her experience. And those doubts only grew such that she left in her early 20s, basically as soon as she could. And talk about being ingrained, she's Warren Jeffs' daughter. I'd like to think that's how I would be. I was raised Roman Catholic and I'm out myself. You have to look at who benefits.

  11. #10
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet_Heart View Post
    @Geonerd I watched the first two seasons and got sucked in really quickly. Then I checked "Dianetics" out from the library but couldn't get through it because it was barely coherent. It was awful. I don't have cable so I'll have to wait for S3 to show up on Hulu. It is amazing. I've read a lot about different cults and I understand how the cult is structured to exploit, isolate, and threaten its people. What I don't understand is the inability of the low level people to recognize it and see it for what it is. Or deep down they do, but the denial is so hardcore.

    One thing that I found amazing about Rachel Jeffs is that (if you believe her) she was skeptical since childhood and she actively rebelled throughout her experience. And those doubts only grew such that she left in her early 20s, basically as soon as she could. And talk about being ingrained, she's Warren Jeffs' daughter. I'd like to think that's how I would be. I was raised Roman Catholic and I'm out myself. You have to look at who benefits.
    I listen to Dax Sheppard's Armchair Expert podcast and I find it really interesting (I also suspect Dax is an ENTP). He talks to celebrities but also some more academic people and tries to get into the root of how that person thinks/is motivated. He was talking to Jason Matsukis (if you watch The Good Place, he's Derek) and they were talking about how easily cult-like religions take hold in LA. He said the people there always looking for (and are used to) external direction/criticism/praise between directors, agents, hair/makeup, etc. If someone from Scientology walks up and says "take this personality test....based on this test you would benefit from these counseling sessions to fix your imperfections", they have a tendency to believe it. It's hard to see it once you are in. The cults usually start with innocent self-help/enlightenment type stuff and then pull the cult crap after they are in.

    I think it is hard for an ENTP to understand how people can be reeled in but that's because we are not very motivated by external things or rewards, we like independence, and we not seeking someone to lead us. It's my experience that most people need external rewards, feel overwhelmed when there is no rules or guidance, and are looking for someone else to take the lead. There are a lot of people in the world who are always seeking guidance and someone to tell them what to do next. I have said this before but I think Loki was right in The Avengers:

    "Kneel before me. I said… KNEEL! Is not this simpler? Is this not your natural state? It’s the unspoken truth of humanity that you crave subjugation. The bright lure of freedom diminishes your life’s joy in a mad scramble for power. For identity. You were made to be ruled. In the end, you will always kneel."

    Religions in general provide rules, leading, and guidance but cults take it a step farther by controlling the lives of people and teach to only listen to them because "the outside" is the enemy and is trying to lead them astray. If they don't see the counter data against what cult they are in they don't see that something is not right.

    It's completely different for kids who grow up in it. As a child, your world is your parents and your immediate surroundings. You really do not really get a concept of the outside until you are older, usually through school because you are meeting different kids living a life a little different from your own. If you grow up in a cult (or are one of those who home school so their kids don't get corrupted by liberals or ideas that do not agree with the families-I'm not saying the general home schooled kids whose parents just are not happy with the education the public school system provides and are completely normal people), you never are exposed to something different so the cult life seems normal. Often it takes an eye opening to the real world for those kids to see they are in an F'd up situation.

    I am also Roman Catholic but I know from my cousins living in conservative northeastern PA that there seems to be a big difference to the churches I grew up in a very liberal area of the mid-west. The east coast churches tend to be rules over lessons and a lot of blind faith to the priests. The churches I grew up going, the priests were not comfortable with the "hero worship" and tended present themselves as ordinary people. They also spent a lot less time talking about and worrying about the rules but all spent a lot of time digging into the theology and history/context of the bible verses over interpreting them to give you guilt or spent a lot of time begging for money. It probably was the churches my parent's chose (because my parents are super liberal) but I didn't get a bad taste in my mouth from Roman Catholic faith. I am not fond of all the pedophilia and covering it up though I think that many churches/schools have issues with that. It was how they dealt with that was the problem.


     
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