[ESFJ] Caregivers and Writing

Caregivers and Writing

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  • 1 Post By Fern
  • 1 Post By nothingbutfoma

This is a discussion on Caregivers and Writing within the ESFJ Articles forums, part of the ESFJ Forum - The Caregivers category; ...

  1. #1
    Unknown Personality

    Caregivers and Writing

    Writing Personality: Friendly Conversation

    Show me someone who never gossips, and I will show you
    someone who is not interested in people.
    — Barbara Walters

    ESFJs excel at relating fact-based information based on personal experience. They prefer writing about topics that affect people in tangible ways. ESFJs may begin a project by discussing it with others, but seek solitude for the final draft to avoid distractions.
    The ESFJ personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer to gather information and make decisions. The initials ESFJ stand for the following:
    E: Extraversion preferred to introversion
    ESFJs get their energy from people and activity in their external world. Spending time alone can leave them listless and bored. They enjoy interacting with a large group of friends and acquaintances. They generally act before reflecting.

    S: Sensation preferred to intuition
    ESFJs are concrete thinkers, placing more trust in experience than in flashes of insight. They’re more interested in sensory data than in the patterns perceived by the unconscious mind. ESFJs tend to be intellectually content—they want to enjoy the world.

    F: Feeling preferred to thinking
    ESFJs prefer to use their rational feeling function when making decisions. They place more emphasis on the effect that actions have on people than they do on adhering to the rule of logic. They tend to give other people the benefit of the doubt.

    J: Judgment preferred to perception
    ESFJs are drawn to closure. They feel satisfied after finishing a project or reaching a decision. They think in terms of likelihoods rather than possibilities.



    Writing Process of the ESFJ
    ESFJs may approach a writing project in the following ways:

    • Often enjoy telling stories based on personal experience. Consequently, their writing may take on a narrative form. The first draft may be largely anecdotal without a unifying thesis. ESFJs tend to organize their work during the revision process.
    • Write for an audience and want to hear how people were affected by their work. With sufficient encouragement and clear instructions, ESFJs are willing to adapt the piece to the expectations of a teacher, boss, or editor. However, a lack of feedback is likely to demotivated ESFJs. To avoid this, seek out an environment where people appreciate your dedication.
    • Do well in a collaborative environment. They may enjoy writing plays, skits, or videos that illustrate their topic. They like writing about events and people, and may therefore gravitate toward journalism.
    • Dislike theoretical subjects. They want their work to help people in an immediate, tangible way. They may be drawn more to medical writing than to technical writing.

    Potential Blind Spots of the ESFJ
    ESFJs may experience the following pitfalls:

    • Respect authority and often cite experts in their writing. Avoid over-reliance on others, particularly if the subject is unfamiliar, theoretical, or impersonal. Look for ways to draw on your own experience or to explore how the topic affects people.
    • Would rather discuss the topic than write about it. Schedule your writing activities to allow sufficient time for composition. If you feel stuck, do something active like taking a walk. List your ideas to help develop an internal dialogue.
    • Dislike impersonal analysis. You may find it easier to begin by writing down how you feel about the subject. Then, fill in the objective data to round out the work. Avoid sentimentality and be sure to include the concept behind the story.


    Source: The ESFJ Writing Personality: Friendly*Conversation | Andrea J. Wenger: Write*with*Personality
    nothingbutfoma thanked this post.



  2. #2
    ENFP - The Inspirers

    Quote Originally Posted by Fern View Post
    Writing Personality: Friendly Conversation


    Show me someone who never gossips, and I will show you
    someone who is not interested in people.
    — Barbara Walters

    ESFJs excel at relating fact-based information based on personal experience. They prefer writing about topics that affect people in tangible ways. ESFJs may begin a project by discussing it with others, but seek solitude for the final draft to avoid distractions.
    The ESFJ personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer to gather information and make decisions. The initials ESFJ stand for the following:
    E: Extraversion preferred to introversion
    ESFJs get their energy from people and activity in their external world. Spending time alone can leave them listless and bored. They enjoy interacting with a large group of friends and acquaintances. They generally act before reflecting.

    S: Sensation preferred to intuition
    ESFJs are concrete thinkers, placing more trust in experience than in flashes of insight. They’re more interested in sensory data than in the patterns perceived by the unconscious mind. ESFJs tend to be intellectually content—they want to enjoy the world.

    F: Feeling preferred to thinking
    ESFJs prefer to use their rational feeling function when making decisions. They place more emphasis on the effect that actions have on people than they do on adhering to the rule of logic. They tend to give other people the benefit of the doubt.

    J: Judgment preferred to perception
    ESFJs are drawn to closure. They feel satisfied after finishing a project or reaching a decision. They think in terms of likelihoods rather than possibilities.



    Writing Process of the ESFJ
    ESFJs may approach a writing project in the following ways:

    • Often enjoy telling stories based on personal experience. Consequently, their writing may take on a narrative form. The first draft may be largely anecdotal without a unifying thesis. ESFJs tend to organize their work during the revision process.
    • Write for an audience and want to hear how people were affected by their work. With sufficient encouragement and clear instructions, ESFJs are willing to adapt the piece to the expectations of a teacher, boss, or editor. However, a lack of feedback is likely to demotivated ESFJs. To avoid this, seek out an environment where people appreciate your dedication.
    • Do well in a collaborative environment. They may enjoy writing plays, skits, or videos that illustrate their topic. They like writing about events and people, and may therefore gravitate toward journalism.
    • Dislike theoretical subjects. They want their work to help people in an immediate, tangible way. They may be drawn more to medical writing than to technical writing.

    Potential Blind Spots of the ESFJ
    ESFJs may experience the following pitfalls:

    • Respect authority and often cite experts in their writing. Avoid over-reliance on others, particularly if the subject is unfamiliar, theoretical, or impersonal. Look for ways to draw on your own experience or to explore how the topic affects people.
    • Would rather discuss the topic than write about it. Schedule your writing activities to allow sufficient time for composition. If you feel stuck, do something active like taking a walk. List your ideas to help develop an internal dialogue.
    • Dislike impersonal analysis. You may find it easier to begin by writing down how you feel about the subject. Then, fill in the objective data to round out the work. Avoid sentimentality and be sure to include the concept behind the story.


    Source: The ESFJ Writing Personality: Friendly*Conversation | Andrea J. Wenger: Write*with*Personality
    This is spot on for me. Thanks for sharing. I'm in a scientific field, so I have to write a lot. I've noticed that I get really bogged down with technical writing; it's a real struggle for me. However, I have also written a few pieces here and there that required a more narrative direction, and I find that I really excel at it, hence enjoy it very much. It's an indirect way for me to connect with people and teach them about something. Very satisfying for an ESFJ! I also like that there is clear structure and guidelines yet leaves room for creativity. I've been toying with the idea of maybe dipping my toes into science journalism at some point.


 

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