How has MBTI helped you?

How has MBTI helped you?

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This is a discussion on How has MBTI helped you? within the General Chat forums, part of the The Cafe Lounge category; for those of you who know your type... I'm interested to see how hearing/learning about it has affected each one ...

  1. #1

    How has MBTI helped you?

    for those of you who know your type... I'm interested to see how hearing/learning about it has affected each one differently. Why do you care about it? What did you get out of learning about it?



  2. #2

    Quote Originally Posted by cryptonia View Post
    for those of you who know your type... I'm interested to see how hearing/learning about it has affected each one differently. Why do you care about it? What did you get out of learning about it?
    I have never heard of the Myer's Briggs Type Indicator until I went on google and search for a personality test. I was a little skeptical at first, but after I took the test it described my personality accurately. It gave me insight of who I really am and I became a believer of the MBTI. It has empowered my outlook on life and made me more aware of why people act like they do. What I got after learning about it is PersonalityCafe. It motivated me to build a site dedicated to the 16 personality types which will help others discover themselves.

  3. #3

    It allows me to find amusing individuals who take on face value any one given internet site description. For the amusement value alone it must be appreciated.

  4. #4

    I'm going to venture out and say that mbti is not an effective tool for helping people. People will read on description and instantly take everything it says to heart and then that's the end of it, they assume that they are stuck in that one thing. It's not wise or healthy to rely on something that "decides" who you are for you. You yourself should figure out who you are on your own.

  5. #5

    Valid points, Calypso. I have seen, individuals use of types to label other individuals on no basis other than observation. Generic descriptors were then applied as if this was a valid way to understand someone. Treat individuals as individuals.

  6. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by Calypso View Post
    I'm going to venture out and say that mbti is not an effective tool for helping people. People will read on description and instantly take everything it says to heart and then that's the end of it, they assume that they are stuck in that one thing. It's not wise or healthy to rely on something that "decides" who you are for you. You yourself should figure out who you are on your own.
    The mbti tool is not necessarily for everyone. Who are we to tell individuals if the test will help them or not. It is up to the individual to decide whether this tool helps or doesn't. I already knew my personality before I took the test but I was curious to see if I was alone in my beliefs or not. The test did not decide who I am. It just answered some of my questions I had about myself. The test did help me improve my relationships with people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oni View Post
    Valid points, Calypso. I have seen, individuals use of types to label other individuals on no basis other than observation. Generic descriptors were then applied as if this was a valid way to understand someone. Treat individuals as individuals.
    I agree that we all should treat individuals as individuals.

  7. #7

    even by its own theory, it's only about 70% accurate. To say it's not effective, or useless, though is pretty arrogant. It's not just some internet test... so what about the psychologists who bother to get certified to administer it?

    http://www.careerprocanada.ca/index....coming_an_MBTI

    Individuals are individuals, oni, but so are ants. Would you stop and say "no generalizations can be made, because every ant is different"? Rightly used, you'd never make a judgment about someone's type without first knowing them. What you're describing is a misuse of MBTI... and just about anything can be misused and cause harm.

    It's easy to figure out why something has problems though... I was curious to see how it helped different people. Although... I guess you did kind of answer my question anyway, though, now that I think about it.

  8. #8

    The qualifications for becoming an MBTI Practitioner are a joke, Cryptonia. There's nothing professional about it in the least. Any random yahoo on the street who meets those qualifications could become one. So it's not nearly as important as you make it out to be.

  9. #9

    I'm not making it out to be important, objectively, at all. My point was only that it's recognized by psychologists as legitimate. Only fools would consider personality all there is to a person... but you're overstepping yourself. Saying "it's no help to anyone" could scare away people who thought differently because they don't want to look like they think some 'ridiculous idea' has some kind of value. What you mean is "it's no help to me." You seemed to claim that the only way it can be used is to tell you who you are--why? Does finding a harmful way of using something mean there are no helpful ones?

    also, on www.intpforum.com theres a guy named Decaf who's in grad school for chemistry, is going back to school for psychology, and decided to get his MBTI certification because he thought it a useful tool to go along with the rest of his psychology learning. Just because "any yahoo could do it" doesn't mean it's false. Any yahoo could become a car mechanic, as well, but I would still trust one of them to fix my radiator more than I would myself. Difficulty of field != value.
    Last edited by cryptonia; 10-19-2008 at 12:18 PM.

  10. #10

    I find that MBTI is useful for predicting behavior based on established preferences, although I would never claim that it could be applied perfectly for this purpose. I do believe that a person is more than just a type. MBTI can allow a person to weigh and determine probabilities in a predictive way. For example, I would expect that an extreme introvert might not like going out to a massive party with a bunch of strangers as a way to unwind after a stressful day, so I would use my understanding of the various preferences to enhance my capacity for empathy in order to avoid making social mistakes.

    It allows me to deal with people in a less generalized way, contrary to what many believe, because if I am merely applying the "treat others as you want to be treated" rule, I end up with problems. Likewise, I often dislike being on the other end of that method of determining the acceptability of behaviors. Most Thinking types who attempt to treat me as they want to be treated end up hurting me. Extraverts who treat me as they want to be treated end up overwhelming me. Judging types who treat me as they want to be treated end up taking all of the spontaneity out of our interactions and make it difficult to relax. By understanding that these differences exist, I feel that I am better able to understand where others are coming from, and I am also more capable of catering to their specific needs by using their known preferences to accurately guess what those needs may be and why. All that MBTI does is categorize the things that are already known. The less extreme any individual is in his or her type, the less effective it will be for predicting behavior. It isn't perfect, but I do feel that my social interactions became more successful after I started consciously applying it. People feel like I really understand them, and it is easier to make friends. Knowing our differences can also reduce conflict if everyone involved agrees to accept those differences.

    I have been known to misuse MBTI in a defensive way, forming biases and avoiding specific types because of negative experiences in the past that caused me to develop something like a phobia. I have made considerable progress in overcoming my prejudices, but I still find myself slipping into my old attitudes occasionally. That is one of the two greatest dangers I see in using this system. The other is that it has the potential to limit a person's concept of self and prevent growth or change that moves in a direction that seems contrary to the established label. Type becomes an excuse for stagnation, and some undesirable tendencies would be all too easy to blame on this preference or that. "I procrastinate because I'm a P, not because I'm lazy," or "I'm insensitive because I'm a T, not because I'm a bully." I have seen this happen.



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