[Generation X] Gen X: The Whiny Generation (Artical from 1993)

Gen X: The Whiny Generation (Artical from 1993)

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This is a discussion on Gen X: The Whiny Generation (Artical from 1993) within the Generation X Forum forums, part of the The Generations category; Here is an artical on Gen X from the 90s. Millennials are the current target and after it'll be Gen ...

  1. #1

    Gen X: The Whiny Generation (Artical from 1993)

    Here is an artical on Gen X from the 90s.
    Millennials are the current target and after it'll be Gen Z's turn. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.new...194042%3famp=1
    Judson Joist, Turlowe and andrewyu2005 thanked this post.



  2. #2

    Allow me to tear this argument apart piece by piece. First, so you know where I'm coming from, I'm currently classified as a "Xennial" (born in 1980), formerly classified as Gen-X. Sociologists can't agree on the cut-off date, so this site classifies me as Gen-Y. I turned 18 in 1998, so I'm not a Millennial. I thought the "standard" (as if there is one) for that was that you had to turn 18 after the year 2000 and were before Gen-Z. Anyway, screw that noise. On with the spiel.

    Ever since the publication of Douglas Coupland's book "Generation X," we've been subjected to a barrage of essays, op-ed pieces and feature articles blaming us baby boomers for the sad face of the twentysomething generation: the boomers took all the good jobs; the boomers are destroying the planet, the media is boomer-dominated and boomer-obsessed.
    Maybe the older portion of Gen-X did that, but not the younger portion.

    The litany is never-ending. If you believe the Generation X essayists, all the troubles of the world can be traced to us fortysomethings.
    All the troubles of the world can be attributed to bureaucratic collectivism which isn't specific to any generation and afflicts us all with the same injustices.

    Well, enough is enough. As a baby boomer, I'm fed up with the ceaseless carping of a handful of spoiled, self-indulgent, overgrown adolescents.
    That's what your parent said about your generation. At least, I'm assuming it is. Didn't Plato say something like this? Plato was an authoritarian collectivist putz.

    Gen-Xers may like to call themselves the "Why Me?" generation, but they should be called the "Whiny" generation.
    Why? Because we can see the futility in basing one's life around their job?

    If these pusillanimous purveyors of pseudo-angst
    Colorful phrasing, but only a pretentious prick would use the term "pusillanimous." That's basically a five-syllable word for "sissified." You think we're sissies because we're tired of being told how expendable we are in the workplace?

    would put as much effort into getting a life as they do into writing about their horrible fate, we'd be spared the weekly diatribes that pass for reasoned argument in newspapers and magazines.
    Notice how the notion of "getting a life" is left ill-defined - or not really defined at all.

    Let's examine for a moment the horrible fate visited on Generation X. This is a generation that was raised with the highest standard of living in the history of the world.
    Here's where the writer reveals their materialistic perspective. They define "standard of living" in terms of material comforts. What about the spirit of The People or The Nation? What about afflictions of the spirit? Of course, when I say "The People," I'm talking about individuals, not just society at large. Dialectical materialism needs to be crushed with a clenched fist.

    By the time they arrived on the scene, their parents were comfortably established in the middle class
    My parents were working class. My dad was a truck driver and my mom was (and still is) a medical transcriptionist.

    and could afford to satisfy their offspring's every whim. And they did, in spades.
    Maybe I'm the exception here since I was somewhat of a "little goody two-shoes" as a kid (typical '80s nerd), but my "whims" typically involved satisfying my own personal scientific curiosities, something which was encouraged by my mom's side of my family (the intellectual side). I was reading college-level marine biology when I was in elementary school - for fun! Textbook INTJ stuff, I know.

    Growing up in the '70s and '80s, the twentysomethings were indulged with every toy, game, and electronic device available.
    What makes you think our parents didn't enjoy those things along with us? My dad loved Mike Tyson's Punch-Out. We worked too, you know. My big bro and I would run the route with our dad and we'd mow the family cemetery and whatnot. It's important to balance work with play or your mind will grow dull. If you devote your life to work, but have no sense of purpose behind it, you're living in bondage to futility.

    They didn't even have to learn how to amuse themselves since Mom and Dad were always there to ferry them from one organized activity to another.
    I was a latchkey kid. Also, whatever activities we did were generally encouraged. I was practically forced to play baseball (none of us knew at the time that baseball is a Masonic conspiracy). A lot of us, myself included, loved going out in the woods and just romping around or going for long walks. This was back when people could still do that without fear of getting raped or mugged. Also, this was rural Indiana. Think 'Stranger Things' except we were closer to the age of 'The Monster Squad'.

    If we baby boomers were spoiled, the Whiny Generation was left out to rot. They had it all.
    Again, the writer is only looking at material comforts while ignoring spiritual afflictions.

    That's the essence of the Generation X problem. We have a generation (or at least part of a generation) whose every need has been catered to since birth. Now, when they finally face adulthood, they expect the gift-giving to continue.
    Plenty of us were taught how to earn, how to learn, and also how to be charitable.

    I'm 28 and I'll never own a house, whines the Generation Xer.
    Well, it's true, isn't it? For most of us, that is.

    I'm 25 and I don't have a high-paying job, says another.
    Okay, so maybe it's unreasonable to assume that you'll be getting paid upwards of $40k/yr. by the age of 25. But when people in their late 30s and early 40s are still making $12/hr. (oftentimes less than they were making in their early 20s, especially when adjusted for stagflation), that's not indicative of an individual character flaw. That's indicative of a systemic anomaly.

    Are these realistic expectations?
    Is it realistic for you to expect us to continue serving your idolatrous Leviathan system when we already know that the "game" is rigged against us? Why shouldn't we rebel against you and your altars of Mammon? Once the tables turn (or should I say "turned over"), what place will you have in our world except to serve as a footnote illustrating the mentality of idolatry?

    How's that for pseudo-angst?

    Of course not. It's the rare individual in the last 40 years who had a high-paying job and owned a home prior to his or her 30th birthday.
    It's not like we're asking to live like royalty, but why do you want us to settle for the lowest common denominator? Do you think it's right for a 39-year-old to make less money than they were making when they were 21? A lot of us would be satisfied with a bachelor's standard of living, but if we rent (as most of us do), then we're at the mercy of economic happenstance. That's our so-called "fate." Landlords can raise rent on a whim. Meanwhile, wages stagnate. You're not even willing to let us live in affordable apartments in our late 30s, yet you expect our generation to take care of yours once you're in your twilight years. You've screwed yourselves over by screwing us over.

    But the Whiners want everything now.
    As a Xennial who's worked alongside Millennials, I can tell you that's a myth. Either that or they're the exception.

    A generation raised on the principle of instant satisfaction simply can't understand the concepts of long-term planning and deferred gratification.
    What about "denied" gratification? If you want the next generation to be ambitious, then don't put obstacles in their path in the name of "building character." That doesn't build character. It destroys it. There's a difference between challenge and futility. Challenge has a purpose behind it - a goal - a cause. Futility is just the daily grind.

    [QUTOE]What's their reaction when they don't get what they want? That's right--they throw a tantrum.[/QUOTE]
    Levying a legit complaint - or better yet, constructive criticism - against a "game" that's rigged against us hardly counts as a "tantrum." If you're talking about left-wing rioters, that's a different story.

    The Whiners' most common complaint is that they've been relegated to what Mr. Coupland calls Mcjobs - low-paying, low-end positions in the service industry.
    This writer probably doesn't differentiate between a department store and an orthopedics plant. In my experience, they pay close to the same wage. Minimum wage for a department store job and $10-12/hr. for the orthopedics plant (in some cases, $15/hr.). I'm speaking from experience here. The vast majority of people whose labor produces those orthopedic implants could never afford them.

    You've sided with Scrooge against Bob Cratchit.

    I don't doubt that many Whiners are stuck in such jobs. But whose fault is that?
    That's right. Blame the victim. Worship your institutions like a good little idolatrous whore. It's no wonder so many people develop a victimhood mentality (which is the wrong approach). And if it's not that, it's fatalism (I've been there, myself).

    Here's a generation that had enormous educational opportunities. But many Whiners squandered those chances figuring that a good job was a right, not a privilege.
    False. Those types are the exception to the rule.

    My parents' generation provided a better shot at post-secondary education for their boomer children than they themselves had enjoyed.
    Which only makes sense since the cost of living increases for each successive generation. Ergo, people have to keep making more money just to break even.

    And we took advantage of that situation in droves as the number of college and university graduates soared. The Whiners were afforded even greater scope for educational success but many of them failed to maximize their opportunities. They had the chance to reach higher but often chose not to or chose foolishly or unwisely.
    Wait, you wanted us to reach higher? You wanted us to have job stability by the age of 30? But I thought you wanted us to settle for low-wage dead-end jobs! Obviously, the writer doesn't even a consistent economic philosophy and is just cherry-picking for stuff to complain about.

    Those who pursued a liberal-arts degree with a view to obtaining a job were either wealthy or naive.
    People shouldn't have to go to college for blue-collar jobs. I can guaran-damn-tee you the writer never worked a blue-collar job in their life. Of if they did, it was at least a decade prior to their writing this malarkey.

    Those who thought that fine arts or film studies would yield more than a subsistence living were only fooling themselves.
    Yeah, because how dare anyone try to make a living with their natural talents. How dare anyone attempt to pursue a career based around their actual interests. The writer is literally correct here, but not in a good way. They're correct in the sense that the system is designed to reduce us all to cogs in the globalist machine. Also notice how they're contradicting themselves once again. Earlier they said we failed to take advantage of opportunity. Before that, they ridiculed us for our original ambitions. Now they're implying that we need to go to college to learn how to do factory work (which is the sort of work you're typically trained to do on-site) while also implying that we should never attempt to apply our individual interests or talents to our "jobs" (not "careers" since we'll never be allowed to have those).

    And those who entered law school will find sympathy hard to come by. More lawyers is one thing we definitely don't need.
    This much I agree with. Pretty sure this is something all generations can agree on.

    The twentysomethings who planned their education wisely and spent the required years specializing in the technologies of the '90s now have the inside track in the job market.
    All that stuff became obsolete before the year 2010 (in my case, 2003).

    Those who chose to slide through high school to achieve semiliteracy are understandably unemployed or underemployed.
    They can still do hands-on work. Some people prefer that.

    Their cries of anguish do not now ring true. In fact, the youth unemployment rate is lower today than it was during the babyboom recession of the early '80s. And despite the current recession, there are still plenty of positions available for highly skilled workers who exhibited the foresight and determination to achieve the necessary abilities.
    Those jobs still pay less than $15/hr. in today's wages - oftentimes less than $12/hr. - yet apartments that once cost $500/mo. now cost $700. So it's no wonder twenty-something live with their parents. In my case, I moved into my former roommate's basement. So sure, I'm a basement-dweller, but at least I don't live with my parents. Not that I'd criticize people who do (past a certain age), since I understand the economic reality of the situation.

    The Whiners decry the lack of entry-level professional positions in the marketplace.
    Those jobs are there, but they don't pay much more than McJobs.

    Granted, during this current recession there are fewer such jobs. But that was also true in the early '80s. Instead of blaming everyone for this state of affairs
    The people who do that are the exception to the rule. Anyway, the root of this problem is not a character flaw on the part of the individual. It's very much a systemic anomaly. Actually, "anomaly" might not be the right word since the whole "game" is flawed by design.

    the Whiners should acquire more skills, education, and specialized knowledge for the careers of the 21st century that will be awaiting those who have prepared themselves.
    So how many times should any individual be expected to go to college throughout one lifetime, and how are they supposed to afford all the inevitably accrued debt? You know, especially considering that we're already stuck in dead-end, entry-level, menial jobs that pay low and stagnant wages.

    Forget a career in law
    Agreed. The last thing this legalistic society needs is more laws, lawyers, and lawmakers.

    Laws made by the weak will be abolished by the strong.

    start thinking about computers, telecommunications, and healthcare.
    Okay, that's legit. But lets cross-reference that against what this writer said earlier about liberal arts. Basically, they're saying that everyone should be a left-brain Choleric extrovert. So what if a person is a right-brain introvert who's sort of a mix of Melancholy and Phlegmatic? We can force ourselves to operate in your left-brain workplace, but it will always be grinding our spirit down. Learn to value the individual. Speaking of which, I thought our so-called "free society" was based on individual liberty. So why does the workplace treat us like expendable commodities? The government does the same thing which is why it baffles me that so many young people today think socialism is the answer. Socialism is basically state corporatism.

    As for the Whiners' complaint about the media being boomer-dominated and boomer-obsessed, that's nothing new. Once a generation has worked long and hard enough, it's only natural that some of its members become ensconced in positions of power.
    Yeah, just like Terry Gilliam's 'Brazil'.

    And once in power, it's not that surprising that they reflect the views, tastes and concerns of their contemporaries.
    Kind of like the Loyalist faction during the American Revolution.

    Why should the media revolve around the lives of 25-year-olds?
    Okay, that's legit.

    Remember, this is the generation whose biggest achievement to date is something called grunge rock. Once they've accomplished more, they'll get the media coverage.
    What, you mean like Project Mayhem?

    So, I invite the Whiners to put aside their TV-generation values and accept cold, hard reality. Interesting, high-paying jobs and rich lifestyles are not automatic; they're not even commonplace.
    Once again, the writer is projecting their own materialist values while ironically (and hypocritically) criticizing materialism. We can absolutely do without a "rich lifestyle." We'd be satisfied with job security and affordable apartments.

    Most people live ordinary lives of quiet desperation stuck in uninteresting jobs that they're afraid to lose.
    And that's been the status quo for decades. In the words of Sergeant Barnes, "There's the way it ought to be and there's the way it is." So if we can objectively observe that "the way it is" is not "the way it ought to be," then why should we preserve the status quo?

    If you want more than that, move out of your parents' houses, start working and, for heaven's sake, stop whining.
    Maybe if there were more affordable apartments, then there wouldn't be so many people still living in their parents' basements past a certain age. Quit making "good" jobs harder to get (and keep). Quit keeping wages stagnant. Quit increasing the cost of living. Then maybe we can all see some positive results for a change. Of course, that's not going to happen thanks to the internationalist order under which we toil.

    It's time for us to make like Atlas and shrug. We have nothing to lose but our chains.

  3. #3

    I was born in '90 and as a Millennial they get a lot of things on my Generation wrong. I do work with someone who was born in '80 and we're both different like day and night but both of us do work the same. No Millennials don't whine to get what we want but work for it. Most of us do rent than own a house but not all of us still live with our parents.
    Last edited by exodus08; 06-16-2019 at 06:11 PM.
    Judson Joist and andrewyu2005 thanked this post.

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  5. #4

    What a rude article. One odd thing was that the author of the article defined baby boomers as "40-somethings" back in 1993, in effect, eliminating more than half of the "baby boom" generation from even existing.

    But, just as well. The author of that article presents an impressively judgmental and arrogant attitude and being lumped in with that rude dude would be more than a little annoying.
    Judson Joist and Dalien thanked this post.

  6. #5

    What a bunch of asshats. Can't seem to get mad about it though. It's the same song that every generation sings about those that follow them. The millennials are getting it now but give it another fifteen years and they'll almost certainly be saying much the same about their own kids.

    Every new generation at least in our modern world faces new problems, and it's seemingly difficult for most members of older gens to recognize the seriousness of them. For that matter it's just as common for younger gens to point to elder ones and condemn them for ruining everything, utterly missing the fact that they did fix many problems, though often in so doing exposing new ones.

    Every generation tends to think that the following ones are driving civilization off a cliff, yet here we still are. There is no cliff, just the same peaks and valleys we've always been on.
    Glenda Gnome Starr thanked this post.

  7. #6
    Generation Y

    In other words, "Get off my lawn!".
    Judson Joist thanked this post.

  8. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by exodus08 View Post
    Here is an artical on Gen X from the 90s.
    Millennials are the current target and after it'll be Gen Z's turn. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.new...194042%3famp=1
    I'd love to read what this pissant wrote about Millennials...I don't know anyone who didn't feel entitled in their 20's. Then life smacks us in the face and we start to get humble with age.

  9. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl28 View Post
    I'd love to read what this pissant wrote about Millennials...I don't know anyone who didn't feel entitled in their 20's. Then life smacks us in the face and we start to get humble with age.

    The article is super whiney. The author whines about whining. And now, he's old. So his whines should be even greater and more emphatic.
    Last edited by Glenda Gnome Starr; 08-27-2019 at 06:51 PM.

  10. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Judson Joist View Post
    Allow me to tear this argument apart piece by piece. First, so you know where I'm coming from, I'm currently classified as a "Xennial" (born in 1980), formerly classified as Gen-X. Sociologists can't agree on the cut-off date, so this site classifies me as Gen-Y. I turned 18 in 1998, so I'm not a Millennial. I thought the "standard" (as if there is one) for that was that you had to turn 18 after the year 2000 and were before Gen-Z. Anyway, screw that noise. On with the spiel.


    Maybe the older portion of Gen-X did that, but not the younger portion.


    All the troubles of the world can be attributed to bureaucratic collectivism which isn't specific to any generation and afflicts us all with the same injustices.


    That's what your parent said about your generation. At least, I'm assuming it is. Didn't Plato say something like this? Plato was an authoritarian collectivist putz.


    Why? Because we can see the futility in basing one's life around their job?


    Colorful phrasing, but only a pretentious prick would use the term "pusillanimous." That's basically a five-syllable word for "sissified." You think we're sissies because we're tired of being told how expendable we are in the workplace?


    Notice how the notion of "getting a life" is left ill-defined - or not really defined at all.


    Here's where the writer reveals their materialistic perspective. They define "standard of living" in terms of material comforts. What about the spirit of The People or The Nation? What about afflictions of the spirit? Of course, when I say "The People," I'm talking about individuals, not just society at large. Dialectical materialism needs to be crushed with a clenched fist.


    My parents were working class. My dad was a truck driver and my mom was (and still is) a medical transcriptionist.


    Maybe I'm the exception here since I was somewhat of a "little goody two-shoes" as a kid (typical '80s nerd), but my "whims" typically involved satisfying my own personal scientific curiosities, something which was encouraged by my mom's side of my family (the intellectual side). I was reading college-level marine biology when I was in elementary school - for fun! Textbook INTJ stuff, I know.


    What makes you think our parents didn't enjoy those things along with us? My dad loved Mike Tyson's Punch-Out. We worked too, you know. My big bro and I would run the route with our dad and we'd mow the family cemetery and whatnot. It's important to balance work with play or your mind will grow dull. If you devote your life to work, but have no sense of purpose behind it, you're living in bondage to futility.


    I was a latchkey kid. Also, whatever activities we did were generally encouraged. I was practically forced to play baseball (none of us knew at the time that baseball is a Masonic conspiracy). A lot of us, myself included, loved going out in the woods and just romping around or going for long walks. This was back when people could still do that without fear of getting raped or mugged. Also, this was rural Indiana. Think 'Stranger Things' except we were closer to the age of 'The Monster Squad'.


    Again, the writer is only looking at material comforts while ignoring spiritual afflictions.


    Plenty of us were taught how to earn, how to learn, and also how to be charitable.


    Well, it's true, isn't it? For most of us, that is.


    Okay, so maybe it's unreasonable to assume that you'll be getting paid upwards of $40k/yr. by the age of 25. But when people in their late 30s and early 40s are still making $12/hr. (oftentimes less than they were making in their early 20s, especially when adjusted for stagflation), that's not indicative of an individual character flaw. That's indicative of a systemic anomaly.


    Is it realistic for you to expect us to continue serving your idolatrous Leviathan system when we already know that the "game" is rigged against us? Why shouldn't we rebel against you and your altars of Mammon? Once the tables turn (or should I say "turned over"), what place will you have in our world except to serve as a footnote illustrating the mentality of idolatry?

    How's that for pseudo-angst?


    It's not like we're asking to live like royalty, but why do you want us to settle for the lowest common denominator? Do you think it's right for a 39-year-old to make less money than they were making when they were 21? A lot of us would be satisfied with a bachelor's standard of living, but if we rent (as most of us do), then we're at the mercy of economic happenstance. That's our so-called "fate." Landlords can raise rent on a whim. Meanwhile, wages stagnate. You're not even willing to let us live in affordable apartments in our late 30s, yet you expect our generation to take care of yours once you're in your twilight years. You've screwed yourselves over by screwing us over.


    As a Xennial who's worked alongside Millennials, I can tell you that's a myth. Either that or they're the exception.


    What about "denied" gratification? If you want the next generation to be ambitious, then don't put obstacles in their path in the name of "building character." That doesn't build character. It destroys it. There's a difference between challenge and futility. Challenge has a purpose behind it - a goal - a cause. Futility is just the daily grind.

    [QUTOE]What's their reaction when they don't get what they want? That's right--they throw a tantrum.

    Levying a legit complaint - or better yet, constructive criticism - against a "game" that's rigged against us hardly counts as a "tantrum." If you're talking about left-wing rioters, that's a different story.


    This writer probably doesn't differentiate between a department store and an orthopedics plant. In my experience, they pay close to the same wage. Minimum wage for a department store job and $10-12/hr. for the orthopedics plant (in some cases, $15/hr.). I'm speaking from experience here. The vast majority of people whose labor produces those orthopedic implants could never afford them.

    You've sided with Scrooge against Bob Cratchit.


    That's right. Blame the victim. Worship your institutions like a good little idolatrous whore. It's no wonder so many people develop a victimhood mentality (which is the wrong approach). And if it's not that, it's fatalism (I've been there, myself).


    False. Those types are the exception to the rule.


    Which only makes sense since the cost of living increases for each successive generation. Ergo, people have to keep making more money just to break even.


    Wait, you wanted us to reach higher? You wanted us to have job stability by the age of 30? But I thought you wanted us to settle for low-wage dead-end jobs! Obviously, the writer doesn't even a consistent economic philosophy and is just cherry-picking for stuff to complain about.


    People shouldn't have to go to college for blue-collar jobs. I can guaran-damn-tee you the writer never worked a blue-collar job in their life. Of if they did, it was at least a decade prior to their writing this malarkey.


    Yeah, because how dare anyone try to make a living with their natural talents. How dare anyone attempt to pursue a career based around their actual interests. The writer is literally correct here, but not in a good way. They're correct in the sense that the system is designed to reduce us all to cogs in the globalist machine. Also notice how they're contradicting themselves once again. Earlier they said we failed to take advantage of opportunity. Before that, they ridiculed us for our original ambitions. Now they're implying that we need to go to college to learn how to do factory work (which is the sort of work you're typically trained to do on-site) while also implying that we should never attempt to apply our individual interests or talents to our "jobs" (not "careers" since we'll never be allowed to have those).


    This much I agree with. Pretty sure this is something all generations can agree on.


    All that stuff became obsolete before the year 2010 (in my case, 2003).


    They can still do hands-on work. Some people prefer that.


    Those jobs still pay less than $15/hr. in today's wages - oftentimes less than $12/hr. - yet apartments that once cost $500/mo. now cost $700. So it's no wonder twenty-something live with their parents. In my case, I moved into my former roommate's basement. So sure, I'm a basement-dweller, but at least I don't live with my parents. Not that I'd criticize people who do (past a certain age), since I understand the economic reality of the situation.


    Those jobs are there, but they don't pay much more than McJobs.


    The people who do that are the exception to the rule. Anyway, the root of this problem is not a character flaw on the part of the individual. It's very much a systemic anomaly. Actually, "anomaly" might not be the right word since the whole "game" is flawed by design.


    So how many times should any individual be expected to go to college throughout one lifetime, and how are they supposed to afford all the inevitably accrued debt? You know, especially considering that we're already stuck in dead-end, entry-level, menial jobs that pay low and stagnant wages.


    Agreed. The last thing this legalistic society needs is more laws, lawyers, and lawmakers.

    Laws made by the weak will be abolished by the strong.


    Okay, that's legit. But lets cross-reference that against what this writer said earlier about liberal arts. Basically, they're saying that everyone should be a left-brain Choleric extrovert. So what if a person is a right-brain introvert who's sort of a mix of Melancholy and Phlegmatic? We can force ourselves to operate in your left-brain workplace, but it will always be grinding our spirit down. Learn to value the individual. Speaking of which, I thought our so-called "free society" was based on individual liberty. So why does the workplace treat us like expendable commodities? The government does the same thing which is why it baffles me that so many young people today think socialism is the answer. Socialism is basically state corporatism.


    Yeah, just like Terry Gilliam's 'Brazil'.


    Kind of like the Loyalist faction during the American Revolution.


    Okay, that's legit.


    What, you mean like Project Mayhem?


    Once again, the writer is projecting their own materialist values while ironically (and hypocritically) criticizing materialism. We can absolutely do without a "rich lifestyle." We'd be satisfied with job security and affordable apartments.


    And that's been the status quo for decades. In the words of Sergeant Barnes, "There's the way it ought to be and there's the way it is." So if we can objectively observe that "the way it is" is not "the way it ought to be," then why should we preserve the status quo?


    Maybe if there were more affordable apartments, then there wouldn't be so many people still living in their parents' basements past a certain age. Quit making "good" jobs harder to get (and keep). Quit keeping wages stagnant. Quit increasing the cost of living. Then maybe we can all see some positive results for a change. Of course, that's not going to happen thanks to the internationalist order under which we toil.

    It's time for us to make like Atlas and shrug. We have nothing to lose but our chains.
    [/QUOTE]



    Do you remember "Return of the Jedi" , Transformers, Space Challenger explosion, and the quote "Wolverines!!!!!" ????
    Judson Joist thanked this post.

  11. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by FreakingGettingOld View Post
    Do you remember "Return of the Jedi" , Transformers, Space Challenger explosion, and the quote "Wolverines!!!!!" ????
    And also the Chernobyl meltdown. In fact, my "kid" sister was born the day that happened (April 26, 1986).


     
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