[Generation Z] GenZ & Authority - Page 2

GenZ & Authority

Hello Guest! Sign up to join the discussion below...
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 17 of 17
Thank Tree22Thanks

This is a discussion on GenZ & Authority within the Generation Z Forum forums, part of the The Generations category; Originally Posted by Maye Hmm...reminds me of something my dad said to me the other day. I was making some ...

  1. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by Maye View Post
    Hmm...reminds me of something my dad said to me the other day. I was making some dessert for the whole family. He came in and said (perhaps somewhat jokingly), "you're not on my bad side, you don't have to do that to get on my good side". I said "I know. I'm glad I'm not on your bad side". Him: "You're never on my bad side". After a moment he was like "except for that time when you wouldn't get a job for months, and I was like, -'what the hell is that girl thinking?! I was furious.'-" That made me so angry. I realized that it was because of his assumption that: me being on his bad side would cause me to do something good!

    Me being on his bad side has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not I am motivated enough to get a job!

    Ahh, another example of the unjust way that authority misuses their power... I'm turning this into the "how fathers are insensitive and stifling dictators" thread. Sorry.

    But it reminded me of what you said about telling people what to do making them less able to make positive decisions. My opinion is yes and no. I think there has to be a balance. I think its probably better not to over-advise and over correct children. This is also called parenting out of fear (rather than out of love).

    And for authority in general to over-command and tell people what to do for the sake of efficiency or personal gain, I think its just pure selfishness. If the authority (and humanity in general) had their priorities straight, it would be more focused on doing what's best for the employee. Best for the citizens of a nation. Best for the student. etc. And that involves not just telling them what to do and molding them. But loving them and respecting them. It has to be a balance.

    I think authority has a role of decision making and ordering. And everyone under authority has the role of honoring that. But that's a superficial level. Necessary, but not deep or meaningful. Just useful. On a deeper level, authority should have JUST as much respect for their children, employees, students, etc., as they should have for authorities. That doesn't mean letting them make the rules. But it does mean respecting them as a human being. Caring for them. Doing what's truly best for their ultimate good.

    I don't think that anyone is really better or worse than anyone else, at least not drastically. I would probably do the same in their shoes. Maybe not now that I have this experience. But a bad experience doesn't make a good lesson, automatically. This is why there is little hope for humans to socially "evolve", in my opinion. We can only try to have as much good in us as possible.
    You know I'm sorry I meant to respond to you like...a long time ago.

    Anyway I think you drive home a great point in the little story about your dad. It really got me thinking. Perhaps there is some fallacy among the, let's just say "people in charge", that their, "underlings", "minions" , whatever we shall call them, desire their approval. Sure this may actually be true to a degree, maybe depending on the personalities involved and the situation. However, I think it simply just works out best for said person in charge, because it allows for easiest manipulation (conscious or not) and obedience. I would say that in most cases, those "not in charge" simply only wish to please enough to not stir the pot. They really just don't want to be on anyone's shit list. The authority taking a liking to them is more of a bonus than a feel-good thing.

    Okay so family is a bit different. We want to get along with our family. But I think one idea remains the same: Authority positions itself as higher than the ones it governs over. Therefore, authority is not our peer. We can never be friends. So naturally, we should we care if they like us? As long as we're not directly in trouble, right?

    I do see this as a thing we are societally (well except maybe in gov) moving away from, the idea of authority as this big bad unapproachable wolf in charge. A benefit to this is that a lessened hierarchy makes us more willing to participate and make changes.

    I just saw this on instagram, is it not the truth?
    image.jpg
    There must be something in the psyche that makes us want to resist. At least for us self-pres types anyway. But yes I agree that we need balance. Especially with kids, some parents are too laissez-faire and they end up not teaching them anything. And there are good laws and rules out there, I'm not a total anarchist or anything.

    Yes, respect and willingness to not be domineering, that would make good criteria for authority figures. I think sadly that such positions often attract the wrong types. When in reality, it should be a service job. Deciphering other people's needs and putting them before your own. This is where we cross the territory into what makes a "leader".

    We seem to also be reaching a day-in-age where people are becoming more able to make their own decisions. With the internet, we have the prowess to become more informed than ever. From medical options to fashion styles, we don't need to go to certain figures the way we used to. This change is affecting not just people, but entire industries, such as magazines and even television. Choice is becoming increasingly feasible.

    The real question goes to those in positions of authority. Shall they respond to this increased demand for autonomy, or risk relinquishing what power they have left?
    AnimatingAnabiel and Npowe3 thanked this post.

  2. #12

    You know I'm sorry I meant to respond to you like...a long time ago.
    no problem!
    Anyway I think you drive home a great point in the little story about your dad. It really got me thinking. Perhaps there is some fallacy among the, let's just say "people in charge", that their, "underlings", "minions" , whatever we shall call them, desire their approval. Sure this may actually be true to a degree, maybe depending on the personalities involved and the situation. However, I think it simply just works out best for said person in charge, because it allows for easiest manipulation (conscious or not) and obedience. I would say that in most cases, those "not in charge" simply only wish to please enough to not stir the pot. They really just don't want to be on anyone's shit list. The authority taking a liking to them is more of a bonus than a feel-good thing.
    I find this a strange and somewhat unhealthy dynamic. And it happens on both sides. Authority figures can want it, but underlings can also want it, or derive some sort of satisfaction from it. I have been like that before. With parents, my old bosses, coworkers, and just about everyone (even people not in authority :P)

    Okay so family is a bit different. We want to get along with our family. But I think one idea remains the same: Authority positions itself as higher than the ones it governs over. Therefore, authority is not our peer. We can never be friends. So naturally, we should we care if they like us? As long as we're not directly in trouble, right?
    Good point. In some ways we're not peers. Peers have the role of being with each other. A good friend may give advice, but does not order around. But at the same time, I think that element of friendship exists within parent-child relationships. If the parent can give orders without manipulation and unfairness. In other words, if there is trust.

    I do see this as a thing we are societally (well except maybe in gov) moving away from, the idea of authority as this big bad unapproachable wolf in charge. A benefit to this is that a lessened hierarchy makes us more willing to participate and make changes.
    Yeah, I don't like the big bad wolf feeling/idea because it implies that the leader is more important/uses others for personal gain. "Authority" means someone has a different role and their rules command more respect. It should not mean that they themselves are more valuable or deserve more respect (although in some cultures that is just the way it goes. you act in a respectful, distant way towards an authority figure, and that does not have to imply unfairness).
    I just saw this on instagram, is it not the truth?
    image.jpg
    There must be something in the psyche that makes us want to resist. At least for us self-pres types anyway. But yes I agree that we need balance. Especially with kids, some parents are too laissez-faire and they end up not teaching them anything. And there are good laws and rules out there, I'm not a total anarchist or anything.
    Aha..unfortunately that can make it difficult. But not impossible. Its just not at all helpful :P.

    Yes, respect and willingness to not be domineering, that would make good criteria for authority figures. I think sadly that such positions often attract the wrong types. When in reality, it should be a service job. Deciphering other people's needs and putting them before your own. This is where we cross the territory into what makes a "leader".
    That would be ideal! Needs, not wants, though. Which is another trap parents fall into haha.
    We seem to also be reaching a day-in-age where people are becoming more able to make their own decisions. With the internet, we have the prowess to become more informed than ever. From medical options to fashion styles, we don't need to go to certain figures the way we used to. This change is affecting not just people, but entire industries, such as magazines and even television. Choice is becoming increasingly feasible.

    The real question goes to those in positions of authority. Shall they respond to this increased demand for autonomy, or risk relinquishing what power they have left?
    I don't understand though. Whoever is in charge is just going to stay in charge. No risk of relinquishing anything, from my perspective. So please explain.

  3. #13

    even when I was younger, I didn't feel much compulsion to rebel against "authority" because
    - my moral compass was always too strong
    - feeling the initial sense of allegiance which is prerequisite to needing to rebel against something does not come easily to me
    - rebellion plays into the frame of the supposed authority by acknowledging their impact on you. if you feel yourself reacting to their frame, ask yourself: "how would this person's peer respond to them?"

    of course, this was all made possible by the first point. until you really know what your values, boundaries and desires are, it's hard to respond with anything other than compliance, rebellion or just straight up passivity.




  4. Remove Advertisements
    PersonalityCafe.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #14

    Quote Originally Posted by Maye View Post
    no problem!
    I find this a strange and somewhat unhealthy dynamic. And it happens on both sides. Authority figures can want it, but underlings can also want it, or derive some sort of satisfaction from it. I have been like that before. With parents, my old bosses, coworkers, and just about everyone (even people not in authority :P)

    Good point. In some ways we're not peers. Peers have the role of being with each other. A good friend may give advice, but does not order around. But at the same time, I think that element of friendship exists within parent-child relationships. If the parent can give orders without manipulation and unfairness. In other words, if there is trust.

    Yeah, I don't like the big bad wolf feeling/idea because it implies that the leader is more important/uses others for personal gain. "Authority" means someone has a different role and their rules command more respect. It should not mean that they themselves are more valuable or deserve more respect (although in some cultures that is just the way it goes. you act in a respectful, distant way towards an authority figure, and that does not have to imply unfairness).
    Aha..unfortunately that can make it difficult. But not impossible. Its just not at all helpful :P.

    That would be ideal! Needs, not wants, though. Which is another trap parents fall into haha.
    I don't understand though. Whoever is in charge is just going to stay in charge. No risk of relinquishing anything, from my perspective. So please explain.
    Yes absolutely about authority just taking a different role. It does not make them superior human beings. Perhaps some people in thkse positions take the term "superior" a tad literally!

    So what I was referring to in your bolded statement is not about the concept of authority itself, but the individuals in such positions. It is important for them to respond to social change and meet the desires of those below. Because if they do not, they risk losing their jobs. Okay so maybe revolutions and the overthrowing of leaders don't happen everyday. But people can talk and they can leave. It does seem to happen in many organizations where if the people in charge do not get with the program, the leadership can end up completely changing. Not true everywhere, but often it will happen. It is almost always in the best interest of authority IMO to keep the masses happy, because at the end of the day, they largely outnumber you. Being fair and accessible not only makes things most pleasant, but is also a CYA mechanism!
    Maye thanked this post.

  6. #15

    I think it really depends on the individual. Some young people are rebellious, some get along well authority. I get along with people of positions of authority just fine, and actually, my dad thinks my school's stuff likes me a lot because I don't ~misbehave~. Though, I can be rebellious, if I see that a certain ruling of authority is unjust.
    Stellafera thanked this post.

  7. #16

    I just hate when I try to put my best foot forward all the time, (almost) always treat people with the respect I would like to be treated with, and am not taken seriously because of my youth. Instead of respecting me as a person I feel as most authority figures just try harder to control me. That is when I would push back.

  8. #17

    Authorities are just people to me. People I should deal with more formally than my peers, but people. I tend to get along very well with authority figures for this reason (also because I'm very rule-following).


     
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. [Generation Z] Where does GenZ hang out?
    By Miss Thevious in forum Generation Z Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-05-2016, 07:16 AM
  2. [Generation Z] Does GenZ Go to the Mall?
    By Miss Thevious in forum Generation Z Forum
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 05-03-2016, 06:56 PM
  3. [Generation Z] Give GenZ a Tagline
    By Miss Thevious in forum Generation Z Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-30-2016, 02:32 PM
  4. [Generation Y] Do you think you're intellectually superior to GenZ?
    By Iris006 in forum Generation Y Forum
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 06-16-2015, 05:07 PM
  5. [ENTJ] Authority figures & why they worry me.
    By MikeLloyd in forum ENTJ Forum - The Executives
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-31-2014, 06:12 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:16 AM.
Information provided on the site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
© 2014 PersonalityCafe
 

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0