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This is a discussion on Writers List within the Guess the type forums, part of the What's my personality type? category; Isn't Rowling an INFP as opposed to ISFP? Someone add Hemingway to the ESTP list, and quite possibly Fitzgerald as ...

  1. #41
    INFJ - The Protectors

    Isn't Rowling an INFP as opposed to ISFP?
    Someone add Hemingway to the ESTP list, and quite possibly Fitzgerald as well.
    Greenfeldspar thanked this post.

  2. #42

    Quote Originally Posted by BakerStreet View Post
    Isn't Rowling an INFP as opposed to ISFP?
    Someone add Hemingway to the ESTP list, and quite possibly Fitzgerald as well.
    Rowling is most certainly an INFP.

  3. #43

    Quote Originally Posted by knowledge827 View Post
    Rowling is most certainly an INFP.
    I agree. Based on her writing alone, the world she created screams with Fi-values. She's drawn inspiration from all her favorite stories, books, and legends and based a lot of Harry's emotional journey on her own Si-experiences. She's very sentimental about the past and uses it to fuel her Ne-explosion of ideas. One thought, on a train, led to 7 books, dozens of characters, and a global phenomenon. Very NFP.

  4. #44
    Unknown Personality


    Alan Campbell (couldn't resist, ha ha): Probably INTP.

    David Sedaris: ENTP? Maybe?

    Joseph Campbell: ENFP
    Ummon thanked this post.

  5. #45
    INFP - The Idealists

    INFP:


    Franz Kafka
    Seems more like an INTP and his main character in The Trial is anything but one [probably ESTP] but he was a true hopeless romantic. Based on how he lived an Introvert, based on the originality of his writings an iNtuitive, based on his hopeless romanticism a Feeler, and by his problems with organizing himself as a writer a Perceiver.

    George Orwell
    Orwell: "From ... the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. ... I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books."
    Someone who feel this way about writing can't be but an INFP.

    Albert Camus
    I suspected he could have been an INFJ based on how a strong pacifist he was -sort of like Gandhi, but after reading parts of The Myth of Sysiphus he's a Perceiver to a fault: he rejects the notion of meaning in life because it's a goal and thus a limitation of the posibilities of the actual person. I even suspected ISFP based on his essay alone, but his idealism was an essential part of him and there's this passion against injustice and love for mankind rather than just for people, he just can't be anything but an INFP.

    Hans Christian Anderson
    An obvious one.

    Haruki Murakami
    Could be also INTP, lots of Ne to the point that I stopped reading "The Wind-up Bird Chronicle" because of all the undeveloped ideas thrown one after another. Maybe it all came together in the end but I gave up. Liked "Hard Boiled Wonderland...", it came together beautifully but there was still a story element totally out of place. I choose INFP because of his interest in characters and relationships in "Wind-up..." and because of the renuncation of love in the name of love that comes later in "Hard Boiled Wonderland...".

    Edgar Allan Poe
    James Oppenheim: "Everything about him suggests introversion, self-immersion, mood, mystery. Everything suggests a man seeking his own soul."
    This description of him makes him IxFP, specially INFP with the last one.
    Last edited by bobnickmad; 11-26-2014 at 08:47 AM.

  6. #46

    Edgar Allen Poe had a habit of planning out his stories in advance based on their symbolic meaning and then writing them all out. I don't think he went where the wind took him in that regard, but instead sought layers upon layers of metaphorical interpretations. I would think that would make him Ni by default. (INXJ?)
    AdInfinitum thanked this post.

  7. #47
    INFP - The Idealists

    I wouldn't mind loosing Allan Poe. As for layers and layers of metaphorical interpretation, that's nothing more than being an intuitive. Extroverted and introverted counterparts of a function aren't that different, I guess that Ne looks at a thing and see different possibilities, while Ni looks at several things and sees the underlying motive. Both can lead to layer upon layer of interpretation, it's just that the first starts from something concrete and suggest connections, while the later just inserts the universal concept, the results are basically the same.

    I wish Dostoyevski was ours tough. He was described as an introverted dreamer, so he could be both INFJ or INFP. But I don't have enough what to justify it.

  8. #48

    My opinion on Poe as a potential Ni-dom stems from this blog post, in which they quote Poe's methodology in framing "The Raven" :

    Edgar Allan Poe wrote an essay, ‘The Philosophy of Composition’, in which he details the writing of his sensational poem ‘The Raven’. If we are to believe the account, he carefully planned the theme, the setting, the metre and every poetic effect – ‘each step with the precision of a mathematical problem’. He downplayed the role of intuition and accident but elevated Beauty to ‘the sole legitimate province of the poem’. Poe elaborates that the apprehension of Beauty ‘excites the soul’ and furthermore hitches it to its cousin, Melancholy. The third member of this abstract trio is Death! This Poe-esque trio is memorably summed up by his assertion, ‘the death of a beautiful woman is . . . the most poetical topic in the world’.

    That, to me, is a clear Ni-indicator: it's not about the words so much as their deep, internalized meaning. The idea that he formed the poem conceptually from start to finish, including a heavily abstract theme, is also Ni-indicating. A lot of his stuff is along this vein ... which is what makes it so interesting and disturbing at the same time.

    Quote Originally Posted by bobnickmad View Post
    I wouldn't mind loosing Allan Poe. As for layers and layers of metaphorical interpretation, that's nothing more than being an intuitive. Extroverted and introverted counterparts of a function aren't that different, I guess that Ne looks at a thing and see different possibilities, while Ni looks at several things and sees the underlying motive. Both can lead to layer upon layer of interpretation, it's just that the first starts from something concrete and suggest connections, while the later just inserts the universal concept, the results are basically the same.
    Ne skims the surface; Ni seeks deep internalized meaning. Ne builds a story outwards without structure and Ni plans it piece by piece. It is the difference between conceiving an ideal and carrying it out dealing in heavily metaphorical concepts and writing a story that is entertaining and symbolic but, for an INFP, often is merely told because the INFP wants to tell it. As a Si-Ne writer, I use a combination of both -- rich metaphor, seeking underlining truths, symbolism (intentional and unintentional) and "pantsing" where I have a concept that inspires further ideas / plot threads building toward an ultimate conclusion, but rich portions of the story in-between that write themselves without structure.

    On that note, having watched interviews with Rowling and Neil Gaiman as individuals, I can see INFP for Gaiman (his Ne entertaining to watch, as he delves into abstract concepts, generalities, and rabbit trails) but not for Rowling. I think ISFJ, since she avoids the rich symbolic phrasing and abstraction that haunts most Ni-dom writers in interviews (like the chap who wrote "The Book Thief," who quickly shifts his interviews into talking about "his vision for the story" and the abstract concept of Death) but others have posed a decent argument for INFJ in her stylized approach. (Yet, unlike Poe, she doesn't do it for the metaphorical elements. She merely tells a story.)
    AdInfinitum thanked this post.

  9. #49
    INFP - The Idealists

    I like this quote about Kafka "Friedländer sweeps all this aside; his Kafka “was no builder of theories, no designer of systems, he followed dreams, created metaphors and unexpected associations; he told stories he was a poet.”

    I think typing Kafka an INTP is based on "The Trial" and "The Trial" alone.
    Read his short stories, they have nothing to do with systems build from theories, while some deal with paranoia of beuracracy, most of them have a surreal dream-like quality.
    I read on Wikipedia that he has a short story from the perspective of a dog and one from the perspective of a mole, so there's that.

  10. #50
    INFP - The Idealists

    https://www.goodreads.com/work/quote...iefe-an-milena

    Read this and tell me that Kafka could be anything but an INFP.


     
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