Scoliosis

Scoliosis

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This is a discussion on Scoliosis within the Health and Fitness forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; This thread's about Scoliosis and the treatments that are available, as well as research. A lot of scoliosis isn't even ...

  1. #1

    Scoliosis

    This thread's about Scoliosis and the treatments that are available, as well as research.

    A lot of scoliosis isn't even treated so I'm especially interested in how people treat themselves or help supplement any medical treatment.

    So anyway--just a thread about scoliosis if anyone wants to talk about their experiences, what's helped them, what they didn't know and how it's harmed them etc.



  2. #2

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/283689.php

    Patients with scoliosis who did the side plank yoga pose for 90 seconds a day saw significant improvement in spine curvature.

    A new study claims performing a single yoga pose for 90 seconds for at least 3 days a week could reduce spine curvature in patients with scoliosis in as little as 3 months.

    The researchers, including Dr. Loren Fishman of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, NY, publish their findings in the journal Global Advances in Health and Medicine.
    In their study, Dr. Fishman and colleagues set out to determine the effectiveness of one basic yoga pose - known as the side plank - on 25 participants aged 14-85 with idiopathic scoliosis.

    The side plank involves lying on one side of the body with straight knees, and propping up the upper body with the elbow and forearm.
    After undergoing an initial examination, an X-ray and an evaluation by a radiologist, patients were shown how to carry out the yoga pose.
    In the first week, they were instructed to do the pose on the side their spine was curved toward for 10-20 seconds each day. They were then asked to do the pose once daily for as long as possible, still on the side of their spine curvature.

    Since scoliosis is an asymmetrical condition, I have treated it asymmetrically, asking patients to do the pose on the weaker side only. That strengthens the specific spinal muscles on the convex side that are needed to help with curve reduction."

    He adds that the National Scoliosis Foundation recommend that individuals with scoliosis perform 25 yoga poses to help with their spine curvature. However, he points out that no clinical results support the effectiveness of this, and patients are not advised to perform these poses asymmetrically.


    Yoga pose improved spine curvature by around 32% among all patients

    On average, participants did the side plank pose for 1.5 minutes a day, 6.1 days a week for 6.8 months.
    The researchers found that spine curvature improved by around 32% over all patients. Among 19 patients who did the yoga pose for at least 3 days a week, spine curvature improved by 40.9%. Of these patients, adolescents saw a 49.6% improvement in curvature, while adults saw a 38.4% improvement.


  3. #3

    This looks like a podcast interview with the doctor of this study.


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  5. #4

    My mom has scoliosis and my sister and I have it to a lesser degree as well. My mom wore a spinal brace support for a while in her childhood. She hated it though because people made fun of her. The three of us have all benefited from chiropractors.

    My mother and I also have EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome), and dislocate various joints and discs all the time. I haven't tried yoga poses before but maybe I will now. I have near-constant back pain (massages help) to varying degrees. Most of the time it's not too bad but it's ironic that you posted this today because today it sucks.
    MeltedSorbet thanked this post.

  6. #5

    Quote Originally Posted by Suntide View Post
    My mom has scoliosis and my sister and I have it to a lesser degree as well. My mom wore a spinal brace support for a while in her childhood. She hated it though because people made fun of her. The three of us have all benefited from chiropractors.

    My mother and I also have EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome), and dislocate various joints and discs all the time. I haven't tried yoga poses before but maybe I will now. I have near-constant back pain (massages help) to varying degrees. Most of the time it's not too bad but it's ironic that you posted this today because today it sucks.
    Thanks--that's good to know. I never had scoliosis, but I have a couple family members who have it and am trying to research for them. I'm glad chiropractors helped you and will keep that in mind.

    It does look pretty interesting to me too--the yoga poses.

    I did a really fast google search on EDS because I'd never heard of it, and it does seem like someone with EDS should approach yoga with caution.

    The yoga poses that this doctor advocates for are pretty specific and they don't seem like something that would cause extra stress on joints, but I did read that sometimes EDS can make it harder for people to hold poses for as long because it will put stress on the tissue and connective tissue. So I am sure you are way more aware of EDS and scoliosis, but yoga seems like something that should be approached carefully, ideally with an instructor that's worked with EDS bodies before.

    https://movingprayer.wordpress.com/2...hypermobility/

    I saw the x-ray of my family member and to me it looked like kind of an S shape. But I am just learning about scoliosis--Idk anything about it. Seems like it can progress and get worse, so I'd like to know how to help counter that with regular activity. Seems like the poses are only on one side (on the side with the curve going out). I want to learn more about which ones might help the S shape spine.
    Suntide thanked this post.

  7. #6

    @MeltedSorbet Yup, that is the exact type of of EDS I have--the hypermobility type, from your link. (There are a ton of variations of EDS but hypermobility is what my mom and I have.) I agree I'd definitely need to approach the yoga with caution because of the dislocation. My left hip especially is the worst. It's just like permanently dislocated no matter what I do haha. Sometimes in the morning when I stand up after sleeping in a normal position all night, I'll just crumple to the ground if I try to put any weight on my left leg because my hip is dislocated. Bleh. Yeah, I can definitely see how yoga poses might strain that if I'm not careful. Good call.

    My spine is a slight S as well. It's pretty hard for me to do things like stand or sit up straight with proper posture because of it, unless I am actively concentrating on doing so (because it doesn't feel natural at all, since it's just not how my spine is). Well, here's definitely something your family member SHOULDN'T do that I really shouldn't either (but do anyway because it's really hard to stop doing it)--cracking my own back. I definitely don't crack it into it's proper alignment the way a chiropractor does. But the release of those gasses or whatever that build up in our spinal discs when I crack it is like a (very, very short-lived) painkiller. Which becomes incredibly addictive. I'm in the bad habit of doing it since childhood, and nowhere near able to stop doing it yet. Make sure they don't do this or it's gonna get worse ;_;
    MeltedSorbet thanked this post.

  8. #7

    @Suntide

    haha they crack their back all the time and it drives me nuts. I get a little bit of stretch and maybe some popping, but not full out cracking the back! But that's exactly what they do.

    Maybe they should just see a chiropractor who will do a professional job--not sure where or why they ever started, since it's not like they've ever been to the chiropractor. Maybe there is something about having scoliosis though where people might feel motivated to crack their own backs.

    I know I will do weird stuff with my neck just because it feels like a problem, and so I just want to do something--maybe back cracking is similar.

    I saw some people also use foam rolls--I wonder if that might help.

    This video is interesting since it's almost the same as the plank pose (the first roll stretch thing), with the pressure on the spine. Idk anything about this or if it's safe, and haven't looked into it. But it'd probably be safer than back cracking if I can only get my family member off of that (it seems like an addiction almost!).

    I wonder what the consensus is for this type of stretch with the ball, with chiropractors.



    I would like to try using one of these for my own spine problems (some parts of my back are pretty rigid and I'm starting to develop some issues with lower back--probably injury or use from my job).

    But thanks for mentioning the back cracking--just from looking at the spine on the x-ray, I can imagine that cracking the back feels good just because of the burden of the curve of the spine. Perhaps rolling with that foam roller could also act as a relief (though I'm sure not as instantly satisfying as back cracking).
    Suntide thanked this post.

  9. #8

    I can't edit so here's something else I was going to add to the last post:


    Edit: Oh here's a video about the Scroth's Method.

    I think it's helpful to have these resources, because at least I felt like, when I was reading about scoliosis, that there's not a lot offered from traditional medicine. A lot of people with less severe curves don't seem to get any treatment in the US but idk. I guess we will see if my family member is prescribed anything. But it seems useful, since scoliosis can get worse with time, to at least know what possibilities there are for other treatments.

    Suntide thanked this post.

  10. #9

    I have scoliosis including kyphosis, though kyphosis is my main issue. When I was younger (around 11 or 12) I had the option of wearing a back brace, which would have had a 50% chance of fixing my back. Unfortunately, at that time I didn't "feel like it". Now I have to wait until my late 20's to get laser surgery. I went to a chiropractor in my early teens but it never really did much. It made me "feel" a little better but didn't actually improve the issue. I went to physical therapy in my later teens for about 9 months. It did nothing, and actually made my pain worse. Now I just avoid recognized triggers and make sure to balance rest and exercise. Stretching also helps a lot, at least with mild pain.
    MeltedSorbet and Suntide thanked this post.

  11. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucan1010 View Post
    I have scoliosis including kyphosis, though kyphosis is my main issue. When I was younger (around 11 or 12) I had the option of wearing a back brace, which would have had a 50% chance of fixing my back. Unfortunately, at that time I didn't "feel like it". Now I have to wait until my late 20's to get laser surgery. I went to a chiropractor in my early teens but it never really did much. It made me "feel" a little better but didn't actually improve the issue. I went to physical therapy in my later teens for about 9 months. It did nothing, and actually made my pain worse. Now I just avoid recognized triggers and make sure to balance rest and exercise. Stretching also helps a lot, at least with mild pain.
    Thanks for sharing your experience. What do you mean by 'triggers'?


     
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