[INFJ] INFJ real estate agents career advice

INFJ real estate agents career advice

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This is a discussion on INFJ real estate agents career advice within the INFJ Forum - The Protectors forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; hello fellow INFJs- First time posting and excited to be here. I've been thinking about this for awhile and getting ...

  1. #1

    INFJ real estate agents career advice

    hello fellow INFJs-

    First time posting and excited to be here.

    I've been thinking about this for awhile and getting cold feet on whether I should pull the trigger on being a real estate agent. I've been in sales before for 8+ years. I was great at it and top performer, however it drained me so much. I didn't want to talk with anyone when I came home. Now, as I'm getting older, I'm finding the my Introvert side is coming out more and more. Some reason my adaptability isn't as strong as it use too, but I know it's not going to stop me if I do chose that path. Maybe because I'm tired to being chameleon and just want to be myself. Currently, I'm working from home. It's great, but I'm not connecting with people. Complete isolation. I'm in my comfort zone and I recognize this can be a bad thing. It's a toss up for me right now to continue on my path or real estate.

    Are there any INFJ that are agents? Or know anyone that's an INFJ that are agent that loves or enjoys being a real estate agent? If you can guys can shed some light and tell me about your experience.



  2. #2
    INTJ - The Scientists

    I don't know any INFJ real estate agents (or any real estate agents at all, for that matter), but I would guess that your experience of being "drained" would be common for INFJs. On one hand, I think INFJs would enjoy the personal contact with clients and would like the fact that the INFJ was helping the client meet a practical need. On the other hand, in addition to getting drained by all of the socializing, I would also predict that INFJs would experience a lack of higher purpose or meaning in their job, especially if they were only helping wealthy people buy much larger houses than they really have any need for. INFJs might also be put off by spoiled or entitled clients complaining about nitpicky issues and "first world problems" (such as the wrong kind of granite countertops in the kitchen or a swimming pool that wasn't big enough for their taste).

    Perhaps an INFJ real estate might feel like they were achieving some kind of higher purpose if their clients were all low-income people who have struggled to own a house (e.g. because of discrimination or something along those lines)...?

  3. #3

    Welcome to the site! I work in property management. The only way I am able to do it is because I only have to go to the office once or twice a month. I could not do it everyday. My company owns several properties, but I only have to be onsite at one or two. There are slower days when I don't have to do much, but the days that I have several showings and phone calls I am beat by the time the day is over. I have nothing left by the time I get home, I barely talk to my family, and I am in bed early. Therefore, as you can tell, I could not do it everyday. That's just my experience. Use your own intuition and go for what you want in life.

  4. #4

    Quote Originally Posted by D4P View Post
    I don't know any INFJ real estate agents (or any real estate agents at all, for that matter), but I would guess that your experience of being "drained" would be common for INFJs. On one hand, I think INFJs would enjoy the personal contact with clients and would like the fact that the INFJ was helping the client meet a practical need. On the other hand, in addition to getting drained by all of the socializing, I would also predict that INFJs would experience a lack of higher purpose or meaning in their job, especially if they were only helping wealthy people buy much larger houses than they really have any need for. INFJs might also be put off by spoiled or entitled clients complaining about nitpicky issues and "first world problems" (such as the wrong kind of granite countertops in the kitchen or a swimming pool that wasn't big enough for their taste).

    Perhaps an INFJ real estate might feel like they were achieving some kind of higher purpose if their clients were all low-income people who have struggled to own a house (e.g. because of discrimination or something along those lines)...?
    Yes, I totally agree and can see myself thinking those thoughts. I can see myself cringe as I attempt to battle the judgement in my head. Maybe I can do more research more in real estate niches that might fit me better. Thanks for kick starting my brainstorm. Cheers!

  5. #5

    Quote Originally Posted by INForJoking View Post
    Welcome to the site! I work in property management. The only way I am able to do it is because I only have to go to the office once or twice a month. I could not do it everyday. My company owns several properties, but I only have to be onsite at one or two. There are slower days when I don't have to do much, but the days that I have several showings and phone calls I am beat by the time the day is over. I have nothing left by the time I get home, I barely talk to my family, and I am in bed early. Therefore, as you can tell, I could not do it everyday. That's just my experience. Use your own intuition and go for what you want in life.
    I appreciate your feedback and sharing. Lots of perspective! There was a reason why I left that sale job and it became very difficult stand. Took so much out of me. It wasn't about the money anymore. Don't want history to repeat itself and thanks for that reminder. =)
    INForJoking thanked this post.

  6. #6

    Welcome to the forum @Dragonfly210 .

    I am not a real estate agent, but I considered that as a pre-retirement gig. I spent 18 years in sales and corporate management before starting my own small company which I recently sold. Iím effectively retired at 53.

    I knew nothing about MBTI until recently, and I must say that Iím glad I made my way in the world without pidgeonholing myself as INFJ, and limiting myself. That said, I am INFJ and I find it fascinating to look back on my career, relationships and life situations with my new knowledge of my cognitive functions. My thoughts:

    - Work was always a means to an end, not my passion. I understood that I needed to earn a living and that it was important that I choose a career that was economically viable and sustainable so that I could improve my familyís standard of living over time. Secondary was professional esteem. I wanted to feel successful. I admittedly never felt called to human services, etc. I had a family to support, and my ENFP wife was able to raise our kids (one with serious special needs), while I took care of the income.

    - My favorite jobs were as an outside local, and then, national account sales representative. Like you, I was very good at it, and I liked that while the sales calls would drain my energy, the jobs gave me a lot of alone time in between calls, traveling, etc. On balance, these jobs were very tolerable as an INFJ, and I felt I could hold my head high amongst extroverted friends and acquaintances.

    - As I moved up into corporate management and, ultimately, into my own business I found that I felt more successful and was more financially rewarded, but more drained. I held my own in these extrovert environments (again, I didnít know about MBTI), but I liked my lone wolf sales jobs better.

    - When I ran my company I found that the public loved doing business with me. Weíre INFJ, remember? It was draining, but lucrative and high profile. I built a huge repeat customer base over the years, many of whom would come to me with hopes that I could refer them to other service providers who were as good as I was. It naturally occurred to me that I could get my real estate license and start to leverage my customer base, part time at first. If things took off as expected, I would have an additional income source and something I could transition to if my primary business wore me out. In the end, I didnít need to follow that route.

    - In hindsight, I was never comfortable promoting myself. I was very good, but sending out press releases with my head shot, attending and making small talk at Chamber mixers, and placing my name and likeness in advertising made me cringe. I just couldnít do it. I chose to put a lot of effort into pleasing people. I never asked for online reviews, but often would get them. People do talk, however, and they refer their friends and family to companies that have treated them in an exceptional manner. It was a slower way to build a business, but was very INFJ and, long term, I saved a fortune in advertising. Itís the only way Iím comfortable doing business and, it seems, not really workable in real estate. There are a lot of Realtors. For me to reach my client base Iíd probably need to put a few years into the self promotion/advertising techniques I loathe.

    - If you can live with the need to self promote, my guess is that you would do well in Real Estate as an INFJ that has been previously successful in sales. Youíll be different and people will notice your sincerity and need to please. While you have to spend a lot of time with people, youíll have flexibility with your schedule. If you go in this direction, I suggest you suck it up and commit yourself to a multi-year grind of building a large client base. In time youíll be able to pull back a bit, while enjoying a rising income. Donít do it half-hearted. Expect to be the best. Not the biggest, but the best. The biggest will always be the hard core, driven extroverts that, to people like us, come off a bit shallow and less sincere.

    - I started my business in the city I grew up in. I found it helped to have connections with people I went to school with and an innate understanding of my community and business environment.

    Have faith in yourself and the free market. Good luck to you.
    Dragonfly210, Kelly Kapowski and Vunar thanked this post.

  7. #7

    I only have my experience in being a teacher, where I share the feeling of being drained some days. One thing I can tell you is that it's most important to find some kind of balance in your work. Maybe you can take some of the organising work as well, making for time to recharge while at work. I know it can be hard to find a job where you can branch out like this though, so I don't know how useful this one is.
    Dragonfly210 and Kelly Kapowski thanked this post.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Drecon View Post
    I only have my experience in being a teacher, where I share the feeling of being drained some days. One thing I can tell you is that it's most important to find some kind of balance in your work. Maybe you can take some of the organising work as well, making for time to recharge while at work. I know it can be hard to find a job where you can branch out like this though, so I don't know how useful this one is.
    Yes I agree. It starts with being organized and prioritizing is key. I guess the job I had before required so much of me that I lacked in other areas of my life. However, its not an excuse. I appreciate you sharing your experience. Very bit counts. =)

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Ice Cream Man View Post
    Welcome to the forum @Dragonfly210 .

    I am not a real estate agent, but I considered that as a pre-retirement gig. I spent 18 years in sales and corporate management before starting my own small company which I recently sold. I’m effectively retired at 53.

    I knew nothing about MBTI until recently, and I must say that I’m glad I made my way in the world without pidgeonholing myself as INFJ, and limiting myself. That said, I am INFJ and I find it fascinating to look back on my career, relationships and life situations with my new knowledge of my cognitive functions. My thoughts:

    - Work was always a means to an end, not my passion. I understood that I needed to earn a living and that it was important that I choose a career that was economically viable and sustainable so that I could improve my family’s standard of living over time. Secondary was professional esteem. I wanted to feel successful. I admittedly never felt called to human services, etc. I had a family to support, and my ENFP wife was able to raise our kids (one with serious special needs), while I took care of the income.

    - My favorite jobs were as an outside local, and then, national account sales representative. Like you, I was very good at it, and I liked that while the sales calls would drain my energy, the jobs gave me a lot of alone time in between calls, traveling, etc. On balance, these jobs were very tolerable as an INFJ, and I felt I could hold my head high amongst extroverted friends and acquaintances.

    - As I moved up into corporate management and, ultimately, into my own business I found that I felt more successful and was more financially rewarded, but more drained. I held my own in these extrovert environments (again, I didn’t know about MBTI), but I liked my lone wolf sales jobs better.

    - When I ran my company I found that the public loved doing business with me. We’re INFJ, remember? It was draining, but lucrative and high profile. I built a huge repeat customer base over the years, many of whom would come to me with hopes that I could refer them to other service providers who were as good as I was. It naturally occurred to me that I could get my real estate license and start to leverage my customer base, part time at first. If things took off as expected, I would have an additional income source and something I could transition to if my primary business wore me out. In the end, I didn’t need to follow that route.

    - In hindsight, I was never comfortable promoting myself. I was very good, but sending out press releases with my head shot, attending and making small talk at Chamber mixers, and placing my name and likeness in advertising made me cringe. I just couldn’t do it. I chose to put a lot of effort into pleasing people. I never asked for online reviews, but often would get them. People do talk, however, and they refer their friends and family to companies that have treated them in an exceptional manner. It was a slower way to build a business, but was very INFJ and, long term, I saved a fortune in advertising. It’s the only way I’m comfortable doing business and, it seems, not really workable in real estate. There are a lot of Realtors. For me to reach my client base I’d probably need to put a few years into the self promotion/advertising techniques I loathe.

    - If you can live with the need to self promote, my guess is that you would do well in Real Estate as an INFJ that has been previously successful in sales. You’ll be different and people will notice your sincerity and need to please. While you have to spend a lot of time with people, you’ll have flexibility with your schedule. If you go in this direction, I suggest you suck it up and commit yourself to a multi-year grind of building a large client base. In time you’ll be able to pull back a bit, while enjoying a rising income. Don’t do it half-hearted. Expect to be the best. Not the biggest, but the best. The biggest will always be the hard core, driven extroverts that, to people like us, come off a bit shallow and less sincere.

    - I started my business in the city I grew up in. I found it helped to have connections with people I went to school with and an innate understanding of my community and business environment.

    Have faith in yourself and the free market. Good luck to you.
    I'm am so grateful you responded the way you did. This landed so well.

    Just thinking about my experience and some parallels. That was exactly how I made things happened. I traveled as well and saw the same people boarding planes on Monday going to whichever market and coming home on the same flight on Fridays. The lifestyle was like that movie 'Up in the Air.' I focused on developing myself and long term growth. Phone was attached to my face. My referrals were high and became a machine in itself and I didn't have to hunt much after some time. My customers trusted me because I was honest and sincere about their business. As a matter fact, I don't like the hunting part, but still didn't let it stop me.

    Got promoted and learned business and field strategy was my strengths. Didn't like managing people. Felt like babysitting. Grew on me after awhile and found inspiration in training and leading my team be successful. I was challenged everyday.

    Funny thing like you mentioned, I didn't know about my MBTI until later on. I appreciate the reminder to not put myself in a box.

    WOW! Huge thank you! You have no idea!

  10. #10

    I can’t see INFJ in sales but we do what we have to do to survive. That I understand
    Kelly Kapowski and Dragonfly210 thanked this post.


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