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Why Do Psychology Textbooks Never Mention MBTI?

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This is a discussion on Why Do Psychology Textbooks Never Mention MBTI? within the INFJ Forum - The Protectors forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; The thing is, the mbti is so much more than doing a test that you just read once and forget ...

  1. #51
    INFP - The Idealists

    The thing is, the mbti is so much more than doing a test that you just read once and forget about. When you come to a site like this and you start noticing just how similar our type's thought patterns are, noticing other people that are just as quirky as we are. Noticing how different we all are to other types too. I thinks it's great that we can not feel so alone & that we can also seek advice from people who are totally different. You get a world wide view here and an open perspective.
    Seeker thanked this post.

  2. #52
    ENFJ


    Well, I have known a number of _NFJ's, INTJ's, and INFP's. And I have noticed relationship patterns that I get into with them. In some cases, I learned the type after the pattern had already occurred, and so learning the type and seeing that the pattern was the same was very revealing.

    I do think it's also helpful in that it does not pathologize us. It recognizes that each way of being is valid and has its own merit.

    Also, there is some data regarding Myers-Briggs.

    The Myers & Briggs Foundation - Reliability and Validity

    The Myers-Briggs Assessment is No Fad – It’s a Research-Based Instrument That Delivers Results | CPP Blog

    I think the real reasons that some therapists often might not use it as much are detailed below.

    1) Insurance doesn't pay to help someone grow and develop based on type or to cope with being a certain type--rather it pays to treat someone with a DSM diagnosis, so at the very least the therapist has to claim that you have adjustment disorder to get paid.
    2) Most therapists begin their careers taking what they can get to get experience, which means that they are getting county or court appointed referrals regarding people who are part of the criminal system, part of the child protection system, or part of the public mental hospital system. Thus, they start off dealing with people who may have multiple severe diagnoses on the DSM. Type starts to become a lot less relevant when treating a sex offender who is both majorly depressed and sociopathic or an abusive mom who is borderline personality disorder and OCD. So the therapists aren't initially trained to know much about type or have much experience with it.
    3) Some therapy models are actually resistant to placing labels on people in general.
    4) Some therapists are also very resistant to discussing a label that has not been formally diagnosed more than once. They will refuse to say that so and so whom you and everyone else knows is a borderline is a borderline because legally they are not allowed to diagnose someone whom they have not seen. In fact, many therapists are not allowed to diagnose at all depending on their qualifications. Even if they are allowed to do so, they have seen plenty of patients who have been misdiagnosed. So, even though Myers-Briggs isn't really a diagnosis, if their clients come in saying, "I'm an ENFJ," they might decide that's not really a certainty without greater confirmation.
    5) Different therapists have different certifications and specialities and may focus elsewhere. There are so many therapeutic models and techniques out there. There is EFT couples counseling, EFT tapping, hypnoses, EMDR, gestalt, CBT, peso-hoyden, psychoanalysis, play therapy, cardio imagery and rehearsal, and so on. Depending on which therapy your therapist is trained in, that's where his or her focus may lie.

    But I think the important thing is that if Myers-Briggs matters a lot to you, your therapist should work on understanding why it matters to you and help you to see what it means to you and how you can grow from it.

    Honestly, I think I know more about Myers-Briggs than most of the therapists I've seen. That may be a little intimidating for them--they are after all--human beings. However, I talked to a therapist whom I was exploring dating, and he actually thought that attachment styles and Myers-Briggs types had some connection. I also recently talked to a professional matchmaker who has a psychology Phd who did think that MBT was relevant, and he mentioned that there was a strong correlation between a certain Myers-Briggs type which shall remain unnamed and borderline personality disorder. He said that this type has a much higher incidence of borderline. I found that rather interesting.

  3. #53

    Curve ball: MBTI is it's own institution and fervently protects its intellectual propriety. It's a privately owned enterprise outside of academia. Academia is also subject to its own ambitions and also uses numbers to achieve their personal agenda. Just because something appears in a text book and is backed by statistical analysis doesn't make it true.

    In MBTI's defence. Personality psychology existed since ancient Greece. The earliest text I read was Aristotle's "De Anima," or On the Soul. He already starts speaking of sensation, imagination, intellect, desire. Or Plato's model of appetite, passion and reason. Is this starting to sound familiar? Most people today study psychology for the purpose of being a therapist or an educator. Therefore the focus will be on the diseased mind or development with very little time devoted to the psychology of healthy people. MBTI does get studied in business and management courses though; a friend of mine studied that in college and they did a semester on typology.
    Seeker, Shea, ruskiix and 1 others thanked this post.

  4. #54
    Unknown

    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker View Post
    I also recently talked to a professional matchmaker who has a psychology Phd who did think that MBT was relevant, and he mentioned that there was a strong correlation between a certain Myers-Briggs type which shall remain unnamed and borderline personality disorder. He said that this type has a much higher incidence of borderline. I found that rather interesting.
    Now my curious cat is intrigued....pray tell!! I have a former classmate diagnosed with borderline- wonder if it's the same type. Cool post overall Seeker...I'd be interested to know the relationship patterns you've noticed.
    Seeker thanked this post.

  5. #55
    ENFJ


    i have a pattern with INTJ's, a pattern with INFP's, and a pattern with _NFJ's. The one with _NFJ's is typically a really good pattern. The other two work as friends if I stay conscious of how to keep the pattern balanced. I'm sure I have patterns with other types too, but I haven't identified those yet. Anyway, I've written about these patterns a bunch on the board but am too lazy to link to them right now because I am having a busy day. Remind me sometime, and I'd be glad to share.

    PS---the borderlines were not _NFJ's in case you were worrying.
    lollicat thanked this post.

  6. #56
    Unknown

    Cool - will keep a lookout for your posts! I was thinking of a certain SF type with respect to the borderlines... but good to know in any case :)
    Seeker thanked this post.

  7. #57

    ... is it possible that psychology's focus is as such because science by definition is objective and empirical. The subjective and the phenomenological happens to fall under philosophy, literature or the humanities. And yet, if you pick up a copy of Aron Beck's book on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy it opens up with a quote by Epictetus that is an argument for the subjective. The problem of typology remains that is has been deemed unethical and politically incorrect to study someone based on race, gender, sexual orientation and what have you. Typology is also a means of segregating people and therefore is not taught in cannot be taught in certain programs. Big 5 refers to TRAITS not TYPES. Hmm ... semantics.

    Just a hypothesis or two.

    I know two people who are borderline. One is an ESFJ the other is an NT. What is common is their history of abuse and uncertain family life. In the case of the NT, she is someone who was a political prisoner who underwent countless interrogations. The ESFJ was assaulted sexually. I would sooner look at a person's life history and not their personality type. That said, I do believe certain types are more susceptible certain disorders. But no type is immune.
    Seeker, Waynetta180 and Shea thanked this post.


     
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