[INFP] Moral growth

Moral growth

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This is a discussion on Moral growth within the INFP Forum - The Idealists forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; What helps you to push yourself to expand your moral views/horizon and change your behaviour?...

  1. #1

    Moral growth

    What helps you to push yourself to expand your moral views/horizon and change your behaviour?
    cricket, GusWriter, Aridela and 1 others thanked this post.



  2. #2

    Complex question. Moral view is different depending on who you are talking to, therefore the idea of expanding it would also be relative to many.

    There are basic things most people can agree on: don't physically harm others except in protecting yourself or another, don't demean others, don't steal . . . from here it seems that the general population may go different ways on what counts and what does not to varying extents.

    I suppose life experiences change a person, whether directly or vicariously through friends or reading. I'm not really sure how moral most here would think I am, but there was a time years ago that I know how people would have thought of me, and I'd say I deserved it. I'm far from a finished product, but the progress is inching along, so perhaps it's realizing you aren't perfect, that you don't have all the answers, that most in the world are throwing out their best guess also, and cutting them slack as well.

  3. #3

    My failures.
    GusWriter and Aridela thanked this post.

  4. #4

    The desire to be a good person.

    I dont know why its so important to me to be good. but it is.
    It drives me to look at difficult situations from more than one perspective even when Id rather say this is good and this is bad.
    I guess I have a tendency to really blur the line between good and bad in trying to see the good side of the bad and the bad side of the good so that I can see everyones point of view.

    I have allowed myself to be bad in certain ways, but its a very controlled form of bad. My inhibitions tend to be of not letting people know how good I am, so that Im not taken advantage of.

    Im not a Christian. I do have a moral code, though. I dont think I have to be Christian to have an inner drive to be good.
    I actually think its sad how much emphasis is put on being Christian to be a good person.

    I do remember when I was little, I felt like I was given the choice to be a parasitic being or a symbiotic being, and its important to me to be symbiotic because it makes the world better for everyone, not just me, which probably increases my survival chances if people see me as beneficial.
    Not to mention I prefer the harmony and happiness of the people around me to their misery and despair. Because Id rather be happy myself. :P
    Last edited by The Disciple; 08-14-2019 at 10:53 AM.

  5. #5

    https://www.marxists.org/archive/vyg...ology/ch12.htm
    Moral behavior will always be that which is associated with the free choice of social forms of behavior. Spinoza writes that if a person runs away from something on the grounds that it is bad, he is acting like a slave. Only that person is free, in Spinoza’s view, who runs away from something because something else is better. With this as a ground rule, William James gives a perfectly rigorous technique for moral education, on the basis of the principle that one must always proceed not from evil, but from good. “See to it now, I beg you, that you make freemen of your pupils by habituating them to act, whenever possible, under the notion of a good. Get them habitually to tell the truth, not so much through showing them the wickedness of lying as by arousing their enthusiasm for honor and veracity ... And in the lessons which you may be legally obliged to conduct upon the bad effects of alcohol, lay less stress than the books do on the drunkard’s stomach, kidneys, nerves, and social miseries, and more on the blessings of having an organism kept in lifelong possession of its full youthful elasticity by a sweet, sound blood, to which stimulants and narcotics are unknown, and to which the morning sun and air and dew will daily come as sufficiently powerful intoxicants”.[3]

    In other words, we should not proceed in moral education the same way we proceed in thinking of laws in the criminal code, when we refrain from some deed simply because we fear the punishment that would ensue. Do not, in other words, turn morality into the internal policeman of the soul. To avoid something out of fear still does not mean you are performing a good deed. In this sense, Rousseau was profoundly in error when, wishing to keep his hero Emile away from dangerous and sordid affairs, placed him as a child in a clinic for venereal diseases in the hope that ulcers, stench, shame, and the abasement of the human body would frighten the youth. From the psychological point of view. chastity purchased at the price of fear sullies the soul worse than outright debauchery, inasmuch as it does not destroy all base wishes and desires in the child’s mind, but only creates in his mind a petty and mean struggle between these desires and the no less humiliating and no less servile feelings of fear. Only that chastity has any value which is procured by a positive attitude towards action and by an understanding of its true essence. Not to do something out of a fear of dire consequences is just as immoral as to do it. Every unfree attitude towards things, all fear and dependence, already denotes the absence of any moral sensibility. In its psychological sense, the moral is always free.
    ...
    Thus, moral imperfection always derives from experience and always denotes not a defect in innate reactions and instincts, i.e., not a defect of the organism and of behavior, but a defect of conditional relations for adaptation to the conditions of the environment, i.e., a defect in education. It is, therefore, far more correct to speak not of the moral deficiency of a child, but of his social underdevelopment or neglect. Hence a general conclusion becomes perfectly clear, a conclusion which should serve as a starting point in all questions having to do with the education of such children. These children require no special pedagogics, no protective, corrective, or punitive measures whatsoever, only redoubled social attention and quadrupled educational influence from the direction of the environment. In every case of moral misdeeds in children, from the least significant on up to the most serious, we are dealing with a conflict between the child and the environment, and we have to recognize that every child is a congenital moral criminal simply by virtue of the fact that he is born with reactions that are notoriously maladjusted to the environment. Even in the utterly most well-educated families, no child is born with the ready ability to behave properly; on the contrary, in absolutely none of his normal actions and deeds does he obey the rules of good breeding and morality, and in this sense the whole task of education is only to help the child adapt to the conditions of his surroundings.
    Last edited by Wellsy; 08-14-2019 at 03:11 PM.
    Samari thanked this post.

  6. #6

    Well, I suppose I could say knowledge that demonstrates that action or my behavior violates my value. If you ask what helps in process of acquiring such knowledge I suppose multiple factors boredom, curiosity and perhaps to an extent desire to live in accordance to my values.

  7. #7

    I'm known to be very rigid when it comes to my principles, I will not budge and I'm not particularly merciful.

    I'm actively trying to change this, and be more compassionate with people (and myself) when they slip up. It's hard to do, but I can see potential benefit in it.
    Marvin the Dendroid thanked this post.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Aridela View Post
    I'm known to be very rigid when it comes to my principles, I will not budge and I'm not particularly merciful.

    I'm actively trying to change this, and be more compassionate with people (and myself) when they slip up. It's hard to do, but I can see potential benefit in it.
    I'm known to be very flexible when it comes to my principles, I will budge and I'm hopelessly merciful.

    I'm actively trying to change this, and be less compassionate with people (and myself) when they slip up. It's hard to do, but I can see potential benefit in it.

    Wellsy, Aridela and Samari thanked this post.

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin the Dendroid View Post
    I'm known to be very flexible when it comes to my principles, I will budge and I'm hopelessly merciful.

    I'm actively trying to change this, and be less compassionate with people (and myself) when they slip up. It's hard to do, but I can see potential benefit in it.

    Bloody nines and their lack of spine :P
    Marvin the Dendroid thanked this post.

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Aridela View Post
    Bloody nines and their lack of spine :P

    Aridela and neutralchaotic thanked this post.


     
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