[INFP] If you LOVE your job... What do you do?

If you LOVE your job... What do you do?

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This is a discussion on If you LOVE your job... What do you do? within the INFP Forum - The Idealists forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; So I'm married now. And I feel like I'm starting from nowhere, Because for the past 5 years or so, ...

  1. #1
    INFP - The Idealists

    If you LOVE your job... What do you do?

    So I'm married now. And I feel like I'm starting from nowhere, Because for the past 5 years or so, I've been a vagabond of sorts ever since I graduated college with my nearly-useless Liberal Arts degree. Right now I can go any which direction... another state, another country, back to school-- I'm more of a jack-of-all-trades-master-of-none because I like lots of new experiences, I'm just trying to figure out the next experience I should have, and preferable a bit more stable since I'm married now.

    I always like hearing from fellow infps about the jobs they do and like, and what makes it so likable.



  2. #2
    INFP - The Idealists

    I really enjoy teaching. What I love about it is that it's never boring, and I can be creative. I don't have an actual teaching degree; I teach part time in a private setting.

  3. #3

    I really love my job as a stagehand. In my job I work in a wide variety of environments, indoors and out and can pick up work virtually anywhere. I get to build and support all manner of performances and expositions, trade shows etc. It is both highly technical and very creative, allowing me to work with my head, hands, and body. There are many disciplines in this profession, I typically do lighting and stage carpentry, requiring skills as an electrician and carpenter obviously, but also skills in climbing, machinery operation, logistics, and design. Theres an old stagehand joke, " what do you call a show without lights?....radio", I could take this a bit further and quip ,what do you call a show without stagehands?....Busking (street performance).
    Its not glamorous, not usually, though I have built and stood on the same stage as acts ranging from Andreas Bocelli to ZZ Top, from the Rolling Stones to Kanye West and all manner of performers inbetween. This job isn't for everyone, in fact it has a huge attrition rate with new employees as many can't handle the demand it places on them, but I think its a wonderful way to earn some coin. I've worked in many different types of jobs over the years, this is the only one I've ever really loved.
    under skies, The Hungry One, Mike75 and 9 others thanked this post.

  4. #4

    I work in retail (in the shoe department of a department store). I'm always busy with something. My job entails many different kinds of tasks and on-the-spot problem-solving. Retail is also a great job for befriending coworkers, because there's always some annoying experience to bond over. I like being helpful, being able to see what I've accomplished in a day, and being friends with my coworkers, so it's all kind of perfect for me.
    The Hungry One, Sangmu, Kurt Wagner and 2 others thanked this post.

  5. #5

    ... teach piano, privately.

    business is a little slow these days and I'm thinking of exploring other options. What's important for me is that I don't contradict who I am and what I stand for. Plus I want to have the freedom to refuse clients and only take students who want to become better musicians. There's nothing more disheartening than to teach someone who is forced by their parents. It's not only depressing to the child, but it also makes me feel used as an instrument of discipline.

    Having to take commissions and completely change what you're about is discouraging in artistic fields. How many creative people call it quits because they feel the demands on their work are unreasonable? It's fine when you're asked to perform a specific role, or play a specific piece of music but I would have a problem when my work is used to sell a product or a service I oppose. I think I would be like Robert Pattinson trashing Twilight in every interview.

    ... it's not always about what I do, but who I work with and what my work accomplishes in the grand scheme of everything. No problem working at a nice cafe, or book store or a shop with quality goods. Big problem with working at a fast food dive responsible for clogging arteries by the million or at a holding company responsible for the foreclosure of many local homes and businesses. Maybe what isn't the only thing to consider.
    The Hungry One, Thay, Kurt Wagner and 1 others thanked this post.

  6. #6
    Unknown

    The jobs I've enjoyed the most are

    1: Last year I worked for Disneyland Paris, as a ticket sales hostess, and a Voluntear ('ear' because it's a word play on Mickey his ears) VIP guide. This means that I worked with people in the most magical place on Earth. People come to the park to experience magic, and as an INFP who is often blamed to be to far away in a personal dream world, it means that people were moving from the Human World, to a World of Magic, which is my native terrain. It gave me the chance to perform magic, to make people happy, to help adults find magic in their own life again, and to be a listening ear for people who needed to rid themselves of emotional problems they were experiencing at that moment. Also working at the entrance made me the first and the last smile of the park, it was I and my co-workers that opened the gates and launched people into a day of magic and laughter, when not done correctly, people might have stayed grumpy for the rest of the day because of bad service at the entrance. I also helped people with the problems they experienced with their tickets, or if they had had a bad experience with other cast members then I (because we were the last cast members before the exit of the park) was there to listen, calm them, and if needed lead them to the place where they could officially file a complaint. As a Disney Voluntear I also worked with terminal ill children or bottom poor children and gave them amazing magical free tours in the park, so they could have ethereal magical memories, together with characters and parades exclusively organized for them. (in which often they could even perform themselves.)

    Of course you might say that this is a weird job for an 'I' (introvert), but once you put on your costume and you leave backstage, you're on stage, you're a character, you're not you, you're a roll you play. So everything you do, and everything people do against you, are not against you as a person, but against the character you play. On top of that the Introvert is an energy giver, while extraverts are energy takers. By working at Disney I was capable of giving away positive energy and cheering people up, and then when my shift ended I would withdraw myself into my room, with a cup of tea and music, and kindled the flame that had weakened so much by warming others their hearts :)

    2: For 6 months I worked as volunteer teacher in East Thailand. Here I had meaningful interaction with local people, while helping them with community work, teaching children English and setting up youth activities. It made it possible for me to bring to life ideals that had been in my head for years, which made me feel and realize that I wasn't only a person of words and ideals, but of action too, which was important for me to validate my own ideals.

    3: Currently I'm a research assistant for an academical paper based in the North of Thailand. So I'm doing the field research up here, after which we'll analyze the data and write a paper with it. This gives me the chance to learn new things, interact, learn and communicate with isolated mountain tribes and write a paper which will influence future policy making in helping and protecting these people and their forests. So it gives me a chance to help people on a bigger scale :)
    Razvan, telepariah, Thay and 2 others thanked this post.

  7. #7
    Unknown Personality


    Quote Originally Posted by AesSidhe View Post
    2: For 6 months I worked as volunteer teacher in East Thailand. Here I had meaningful interaction with local people, while helping them with community work, teaching children English and setting up youth activities. It made it possible for me to bring to life ideals that had been in my head for years, which made me feel and realize that I wasn't only a person of words and ideals, but of action too, which was important for me to validate my own ideals.

    3: Currently I'm a research assistant for an academical paper based in the North of Thailand. So I'm doing the field research up here, after which we'll analyze the data and write a paper with it. This gives me the chance to learn new things, interact, learn and communicate with isolated mountain tribes and write a paper which will influence future policy making in helping and protecting these people and their forests. So it gives me a chance to help people on a bigger scale :)
    Sounds brilliant, way to go!
    Kurt Wagner, Turlowe and AesSidhe thanked this post.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Spastic Origami View Post
    ... teach piano, privately.

    business is a little slow these days and I'm thinking of exploring other options. What's important for me is that I don't contradict who I am and what I stand for. Plus I want to have the freedom to refuse clients and only take students who want to become better musicians. There's nothing more disheartening than to teach someone who is forced by their parents. It's not only depressing to the child, but it also makes me feel used as an instrument of discipline.

    Having to take commissions and completely change what you're about is discouraging in artistic fields. How many creative people call it quits because they feel the demands on their work are unreasonable? It's fine when you're asked to perform a specific role, or play a specific piece of music but I would have a problem when my work is used to sell a product or a service I oppose. I think I would be like Robert Pattinson trashing Twilight in every interview.

    ... it's not always about what I do, but who I work with and what my work accomplishes in the grand scheme of everything. No problem working at a nice cafe, or book store or a shop with quality goods. Big problem with working at a fast food dive responsible for clogging arteries by the million or at a holding company responsible for the foreclosure of many local homes and businesses. Maybe what isn't the only thing to consider.
    This resonates with me strongly, after I got out of the service people I know urged me to take a job with an oil company as I have training and experience with the systems they use. Then to go work for Halliburton as I could have made a lot of money as a contractor for them in Iraq. To have done either of these things however would have required me to abandon my ideals and values, to have betrayed what I think is the best part of who I am. I agree the "what" is only part of the question, the why is every bit as if not more important.
    telepariah thanked this post.

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Turlowe View Post
    I really love my job as a stagehand. In my job I work in a wide variety of environments, indoors and out and can pick up work virtually anywhere. I get to build and support all manner of performances and expositions, trade shows etc. It is both highly technical and very creative, allowing me to work with my head, hands, and body. There are many disciplines in this profession, I typically do lighting and stage carpentry, requiring skills as an electrician and carpenter obviously, but also skills in climbing, machinery operation, logistics, and design. Theres an old stagehand joke, " what do you call a show without lights?....radio", I could take this a bit further and quip ,what do you call a show without stagehands?....Busking (street performance).
    Its not glamorous, not usually, though I have built and stood on the same stage as acts ranging from Andreas Bocelli to ZZ Top, from the Rolling Stones to Kanye West and all manner of performers inbetween. This job isn't for everyone, in fact it has a huge attrition rate with new employees as many can't handle the demand it places on them, but I think its a wonderful way to earn some coin. I've worked in many different types of jobs over the years, this is the only one I've ever really loved.
    The Rolling St... wow. Just wow.

    I don't mind handiwork, you know. I really don't. I actually prefer it to some extent.

    I used to plant lettuce on my grandfather's farm when I was younger. I worked at the greenhouse. It wasn't hard work at all, you know, it wasn't even work as I saw it. I worked with the seedlings on those trays, all by myself, only listening to the birds singing and to my imagination running wild.



    Then they would move them to the garden and I would just admire my babies.



    It wasn't a job, you know. But I loved it all the same.
    trinitybat, Turlowe and AesSidhe thanked this post.

  10. #10

    People here (teachers, familly members, even people of my age) keep urging me to go to college, because according to them I have potential. But, hell, I just don't want to. I don't want to spend 3-5 years of my life preparing for something I don't even want to do. And I have seen all the courses offered in the nearest university and I just don't want to do any of them.

    I suppose I love my freedom too much. I don't want to try and be a superstar or anything, I just want to have enough money, maybe working on a normal job, and then get home and pick up my guitar and just play to myself, or read my books, or listen to music. Or play with my cat. Just that. It sounds like an impossible dream as I write it, but I'm still optimistic. I can live rough (I have, to tell the truth, and did well by myself) and I won't have a family to support anytime soon, so I suppose I can dream a bit, right?

    It's a funny thing, my wish for freedom extends to changing my name at will, and changing my appearance at will and living everywhere I feel like. It's this essential thing I for me. Can't explain it quite well.


     
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