[INFP] How did you learn a second language? - Page 3

How did you learn a second language?

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This is a discussion on How did you learn a second language? within the INFP Forum - The Idealists forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; I watched TV. Subtitles in your native language help as well. I listened to what they were saying, read the ...

  1. #21
    INFP - The Idealists

    I watched TV. Subtitles in your native language help as well. I listened to what they were saying, read the subtitles, and made notes of new words. Well, my goal wasn't to learn the language, I was just interested in it. But it just stuck.

  2. #22

    My mother taught me some basic English before I even went to school and my school lessons started in grade three. I've had English lessons up to the end of my time in school, ten years altogether, however, I still have much to learn. Apart from school, I honed my skills by playing English video games, watching English videos and TV, reading English websites, starting to Teamspeak with English-speaking people (my spoken English needs A LOT of work, I'm awful at speaking) etc. I actually mainly interact with people in English rather than my native language at the moment.

    Apart from that, in grade ten, I also started taking Dutch lessons, but the language could never evoke that passion within me that I had for English. I actually forgot most of the little Dutch I learned in school, I could most likely only say very basic things.

    I planned to learn at least some basic Russian in the future.

  3. #23

    I was in a French Emersion school. That helped.

    Apps like Duolingo is helpful, but actual language courses are better.
    Lakigigar thanked this post.

  4. #24

    Quote Originally Posted by arwen7 View Post
    I was in a French Emersion school. That helped.

    Apps like Duolingo is helpful, but actual language courses are better.
    They are very annoying, slow and imo not helpful. I don't need to learn 15 minutes to know what 10 words mean.

    The key is like i said before immersion. Pretend you're in an environment (or actually be in such an environment) with only second-language. Watch TV, read books, read internet articles in that particular language. It is so much helpful. It can be good to first learn the basics (just that you know 50-60 percent of all the words used in that language (and you can do that in two weeks to two months. It depends from how much time you spent learning on that language). After it, just do the things you normally do in that language. Play games in another language, watch TV in that language, change your facebook language, visit wikipedia in another language. You will learn without wasting energy so much and so fast that you will surprise yourself after a few months. Babies also learn by immersion (they are immersed on Earth, that's why they are learning so fast). As an adult, it is very hard to imitate such an environment, but the key is still immersion.
    Named and thatcookie thanked this post.

  5. #25

    Well, I spoke two languages at home, but I learned my third one (English) by surrounding myself in it. TV shows, video games, and so on. Learned basic English at school, read it, looked up words in the dictionary if I didn't know what it meant, spent a lot of time online (where it improve a ton since other people corrected me) and later on, I actually moved to an English speaking country.

    Now I'm trying to learn Japanese, it's a whole different beast! Can't learn it by listening alone, but it helps with picking up words here and there, picking up the correct pronunciation, intonation and so on. I use mnemonics for remembering the writing system and the rest is just practice. I should have a bit more of a schedule though, because I'm not practising enough or doing it everyday (which you should if learning a language, be exposed to it on a daily basis).

  6. #26

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakigigar View Post
    They are very annoying, slow and imo not helpful. I don't need to learn 15 minutes to know what 10 words mean.

    The key is like i said before immersion. Pretend you're in an environment (or actually be in such an environment) with only second-language. Watch TV, read books, read internet articles in that particular language. It is so much helpful. It can be good to first learn the basics (just that you know 50-60 percent of all the words used in that language (and you can do that in two weeks to two months. It depends from how much time you spent learning on that language). After it, just do the things you normally do in that language. Play games in another language, watch TV in that language, change your facebook language, visit wikipedia in another language. You will learn without wasting energy so much and so fast that you will surprise yourself after a few months. Babies also learn by immersion (they are immersed on Earth, that's why they are learning so fast). As an adult, it is very hard to imitate such an environment, but the key is still immersion.
    i've tried watching German tv, personally I found that hard to keep up with and figure out what their conversation was about.

  7. #27

    Quote Originally Posted by arwen7 View Post
    i've tried watching German tv, personally I found that hard to keep up with and figure out what their conversation was about.
    First: you need to learn the basics via other tools (that doesn't need to be a lot, but when you don't understand the basic words, it's hard to learn new words). If you watch for the first time tv in another language, it will always be hard to keep up with it and adapt. That's normal. But if you watch it a lot, you'll make progress. Even for me, watching english television isn't so easy as it could be. I need to concentrate when i watch an english movie without subtitles. I will definitely not understand everything, but i can keep up with most movies (a movie like Jurassic World is easy to follow, but indie movies are a lot harder). It's easier when they talk about topics where i'm more familiar with (weather, politics, news*, .. ). Watching CNN and hearing anderson cooper and wolf blitzer talking about politics isn't hard for me to keep up with it (because i have a good knowledge about intermediate/advanced english political words). But an indie movie like The Tree of Life can be a lot harder to follow.

    * I actually think watching the news in a foreign language could help a lot, because the news is always be easier than an interview between two native speakers (or an in-depth tv-show). Anchors need to speak well so everyone in their home country need to understand it. Only problem is that it is mostly bad news, and not always "fun" to hear it (for INFP's). But it's one of the easiest tv-shows to follow in a foreign language.

    Listening & speaking is also very hard in a foreign language compared to writing & reading.

    Reading is the easiest thing (because you will understand the words that you don't understand immediately by the context of a sentence). Writing is the second easiest thing to do, followed by speaking and then listening. However in the beginning: listening is easier than speaking. But for me: it's easier to speak english than to listen to it.
    Last edited by Lakigigar; 06-06-2016 at 07:04 AM.

  8. #28
    ENFP

    I learned English in school and by living in the United States for a while.
    Reading a book is great for learning written language, as it's a very engaging method. You're actively learning when reading a book written in a foreign language. However, it doesn't really help much with spoken language. The only thing that can really improve that is actively speaking the language, although foreign movies help you get a feel for the language and learning the correct pronunciation. There are tons of online sites where you can talk to real people who are native speakers of whatever language you are trying to learn.
    Like this one for instance: https://www.gospeaky.com/

    Also, when learning German, keep in mind that written German is quite different from spoken German, especially when you are reading classic German literature. The sentences are generally much more complex and way longer. Spoken German is more informal and uses simpler sentences in general.

  9. #29

    Quote Originally Posted by Morfinyon View Post
    I learned English in school and by living in the United States for a while.
    Reading a book is great for learning written language, as it's a very engaging method. You're actively learning when reading a book written in a foreign language. However, it doesn't really help much with spoken language. The only thing that can really improve that is actively speaking the language, although foreign movies help you get a feel for the language and learning the correct pronunciation. There are tons of online sites where you can talk to real people who are native speakers of whatever language you are trying to learn.
    Like this one for instance: https://www.gospeaky.com/

    Also, when learning German, keep in mind that written German is quite different from spoken German, especially when you are reading classic German literature. The sentences are generally much more complex and way longer. Spoken German is more informal and uses simpler sentences in general.
    Isn't that the case with every language? In Belgium, it's definitely the same case, and there are even variations from every part in the country. In the west, they talk very fast and people from the east (it's only 200 km more to the east) can't understand us very well, some need subtitles to understand us, while people from the east talk very slow. In The Netherlands, people have a funny sound compared to us (while they will think the same probably) - compare it with the differences between british-english and american-english, and in the southern part they speak French (while people from the far-eastern part speak german). And of course, i hear probably every week arabian on the streets.

  10. #30
    ENFP

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakigigar View Post
    Isn't that the case with every language? In Belgium, it's definitely the same case, and there are even variations from every part in the country. In the west, they talk very fast and people from the east (it's only 200 km more to the east) can't understand us very well, some need subtitles to understand us, while people from the east talk very slow. In The Netherlands, people have a funny sound compared to us (while they will think the same probably) - compare it with the differences between british-english and american-english, and in the southern part they speak French (while people from the far-eastern part speak german). And of course, i hear probably every week arabian on the streets.
    Not necessarily. Take English as an example. Written English is nearly the same as spoken English.


     
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