[INTP] The Development of INTP Children - Page 10

The Development of INTP Children

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This is a discussion on The Development of INTP Children within the INTP Articles forums, part of the INTP Forum - The Thinkers category; Perfectly...

  1. #91
    Unknown Personality

    Perfectly

  2. #92

    I came across this thread and just have to revive it. I remembered this incident from my childhood (3-4 years of age), since i use to be really hard to keep track of, my parents bought this type of handcuff meant to literally cuff your child to yourself. So one day when my mom was cleaning up the house, she decided to cuff my hand to the beds leg until she finished cleaning and left me with my toys in the room. I kept playing there for a while and once I got tired, I laid my back on the floor, lifted the bed up with my legs (enough to get the cuff out from the beds leg) and went out from the window (the room door was locked) and then knocked on our front door to get in. Talk about toddler ninja skills, am I right? It shocked my mom, she couldn't believe how I even came up with the idea at that age lmao
    Last edited by tattooedvenom; 05-23-2016 at 06:58 PM.

  3. #93
    INTP

    My experience would definitely confirm that people have at least huge parts of their personality from their baby days - The ESTP was always climbing on things, the ISFP was always a well-behaved child, the INFP was an exemplary big bro though a tiny bit more mischievous, the INTJ always stuck out as determined and self-governed (most babies can roll over at 3 months; Few use consecutive rolls as directed movement), and I (INTP) always liked to draw or play quietly on my own, daydream or watch docomentaries.

    Aparently, I started talking in complete sentences at 14 months and there is a video of me at 1 1/2 years of age cheerfully counting my fingers and toes; I also kind of taught myself to read, with some help from mom (who basically thought it was a good way to entertain her bored child) I would also come up with 'creative' terms for household implements if I didn't know what they were called yet, like calling the remote control 'changey-changey'

    We were always a very cuddly family tho - may have something to do with mom being an ENFP. It was certainly advantageous that she 'spoke Ne-ese', and could always tell new fun stories (and at times had a lot of fun with the fact that I was a bit more sceptical than the average toddler. ) Having that INFP brother who almost my age was also cool, as we'd make up epic stories for our legos and toy robots XD

    Though I also got in my shae if trouble...
    There was one time we were supposed to be having a nap at the nursery, and I argued that I wasn't tired, or one time I didn't want to hear a story I already knew. At first I offered to do some quiet activity that wouldn't disturb the others, but when the teachers kept insisting that I comply I basically questioned the teacher's competence and gave her enough sass to make her

    There's a lot of this that probably applies to Ti users in general. The above mentioned ESTP would try to escape from/explore/ calmly walk out of her surroundings, even closely monitoring the teachers to make sure they weren't looking, and once described as mosquito bite as having a bee stuck in her leg tht was stinging her from the inside, and she is also rather sassy XD
    Our mom (who's not into typology) even said that the only way to get through to her was to try reasoning with her, which is probably not said of many energetic eight year olds.

    Gradeschool!Me was pretty much the avid reader, documentary-lover and surroundings-scounter as described in this, and also the designated blanket fort architect, I'd often sort of make my siblings do my dirty wor- eh... direct the effort.
    I also remember finding lage amounts of repetition rather soul-crushing, and at least three teachers who flat-out hated me (two 'because I said so!' style ESTJs and one seriously creepy, elderly ENFJ)

    My father being an elitist asshole who encouraged elitist attitudes & was very controlling/ sheltered me a lot surely didn't do my social skills any favors, but, they should've realized that I was a grade schooler and explained what I did wrong, not humiliate me in public or say cruel things to me.
    The two ESTJ ones just had a burning, capricious irrational hatred of me, and the ENFJ very obviously considered me a complete freak/nutcase... *sigh*
    Having been a teenager, I seriously considered dropping out to not have to deal with that teacher anymore.

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  5. #94
    INTP

    I definitely acted like the preschool INTP, except I started talking really late. As soon as I learned how to read – probably before I could talk, I read anything and everything, even food labels and signs.

    I'm athletically challenged, and even though I've tried a variety of sports, I simply can't be good at any of them even though I want to. I still exercise though.

    I wasn't naturally drawn to less liked, quirky, social outcasts at school. I tried to hang out with the cool kids even though I didn't like talking about typical girly stuff. At least I've had friends throughout most of my life.

    I hate talking about feelings with most people unless it's necessary. Luckily, my mom knew early on that having "the talk" with me wouldn't work, and she gradually taught me about that stuff when I asked her.

    Clumsiness seems to run in the family. I probably have at least one non-permanent scar or bruise at any given time, even now.

    I get distracted very easily and may even have ADD. I've been telling myself to get back to work for the last few hours and I'm still on PerC!

    In general, it seems they have trouble studying, and tend to start and complete most of their projects at the very last minute, and still manage to pull off decent or even good grades.
    Socially, teen-aged INTPs usually remain hesitant to join in and are rarely the initiators in their relationships. They are characteristically very private about matters of the heart and believe it is nobody's business but their own.
    INTPs are so naturally skeptical of authority that they may find themselves in trouble for talking back to adults, pushing limits, and arguing – often quite persuasively – against what they find to be unfair or ridiculous rules. Many INTPs flout curfews or neglect to call to advise their parents when they will be late. Because they are basically inattentive to rules and don't naturally see the need for such courtesies, they may appear insensitive and self-centered. For most INTPs, considering the impact their actions have on others is a learned skill.
    Arguments with an INTP are rarely won if they aren't presented within a logical framework. Since they naturally and immediately see flaws in any position, inconsistencies may be the kiss of death in persuading INTPs to do what it asked. And because they are so inherently unimpressed with systems or regulations they see as pointless or irrational, compromise can be a tough call.
    *nods quietly*

  6. #95

    This describes me pretty well.
    Last edited by EpicKitty25; 12-08-2016 at 04:32 PM.

  7. #96
    INTP

    I love how you post something that is meant to only describe INTP children, but fails miserably at doing so.

    What you have described is no more than a description of how most average children act and think.

    If you don't work with kids, then you have no say in how kids act or behave.
    You have only described the typical behaviour of most children, yet are acting as if this unique too INTP's. You also seem too be forgetting the fact that MBTI tests are profoundly flawed when it comes too consistency, and that personalities change over time, as do childhood experiences.
    So technically your posts mean as much as a piece of crap.
    This is the development of a child, not an INTP.

    Sorry if that came off as rude.
    Strelok and Sangam swadik thanked this post.

  8. #97

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal View Post
    I love how you post something that is meant to only describe INTP children, but fails miserably at doing so.

    What you have described is no more than a description of how most average children act and think.

    If you don't work with kids, then you have no say in how kids act or behave.
    You have only described the typical behaviour of most children, yet are acting as if this unique too INTP's. You also seem too be forgetting the fact that MBTI tests are profoundly flawed when it comes too consistency, and that personalities change over time, as do childhood experiences.
    So technically your posts mean as much as a piece of crap.
    This is the development of a child, not an INTP.

    Sorry if that came off as rude.
    I agree with you!The post was very vague in the sense that one cannot claim it to be either completely wrong
    or completely correct.Which got me very much confused when I first studied about MBTI.There is a movie on Carl Jung called "Matter at heart" have you watched it ?An interesting one though.
    Cal thanked this post.

  9. #98
    INTP

    Quote Originally Posted by Sangam swadik View Post
    I agree with you!The post was very vague in the sense that one cannot claim it to be either completely wrong
    or completely correct.Which got me very much confused when I first studied about MBTI.There is a movie on Carl Jung called "Matter at heart" have you watched it ?An interesting one though.
    Cool! I'll have to wait until after school to watch though...


     
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