brain damage

brain damage

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This is a discussion on brain damage within the INTP Forum - The Thinkers forums, part of the NT's Temperament Forum- The Intellects category; I think I have it. Does anyone else? I am going to a neurologist to test for dyslexia. Which I ...

  1. #1

    brain damage

    I think I have it. Does anyone else? I am going to a neurologist to test for dyslexia. Which I think resulted from an extensive use of aphetamines. Interesting that treatment for ADHD in the end caused an attention deficit. Oh, the irony of life.

    Seriously though, when I read, I invert words for other words and find myself having to reread over and over again. But right now when I write I am focused and I am writing fine other than my lack of grammatical understanding. I may go back for an English degree believe it or not and work on my understanding of the English language.



  2. #2
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    As Dane Cook would say "Life's a funny bitch".

    You wouldn't be the first INTP with dyslexia.

  3. #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Lykos View Post
    As Dane Cook would say "Life's a funny bitch".

    You wouldn't be the first INTP with dyslexia.
    Probably not. But isn't it a shame, the "provider of clarity" who is supposed to be the most acute with language has his greatest powers destroyed.

  4. #4
    INFP - The Idealists

    I still think you are good with language, at least from what I have seen while chatting with you, despite any challenges that may reduce your potential. You still write better than my current neighbor, and she's not even dyslexic. At least if you mess things up, you have a valid excuse.




  5. #5

    dyslexic people are brilliant!!! i am not joking i have yet to met a stupid or uneducated dyslexic person. my co-worker has a bach. degree in native american studies. two of my brothers are one has a very sever case and yet he can build and repair like no other. at 18 he is a master moldest. my other brother studies molecules and different theories about the universe. there are dozens of actors with dyslexica and so many teachers, authors, musicians and so many other talented people.

    dont sell yourself short because you think differently.

  6. #6
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    Quote Originally Posted by slightlybatty View Post
    dyslexic people are brilliant!!! i am not joking i have yet to met a stupid or uneducated dyslexic person. my co-worker has a bach. degree in native american studies. two of my brothers are one has a very sever case and yet he can build and repair like no other. at 18 he is a master moldest. my other brother studies molecules and different theories about the universe. there are dozens of actors with dyslexica and so many teachers, authors, musicians and so many other talented people.

    dont sell yourself short because you think differently.
    This goes back to what I told Night. Every genius has a downfall.

  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by Lykos View Post
    This goes back to what I told Night. Every genius has a downfall.
    Who is Night?

    I kind of think it's funny, really. I've had weird problems all my life, the strangest one being reading compound words when I was about three or four. I could read the simpler words the compound one was composed of, and I realized the compound word was just simpler words smashed together. But I still couldn't process the entire word. I still don't get what that was about.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Sifr View Post
    Who is Night?

    I kind of think it's funny, really. I've had weird problems all my life, the strangest one being reading compound words when I was about three or four. I could read the simpler words the compound one was composed of, and I realized the compound word was just simpler words smashed together. But I still couldn't process the entire word. I still don't get what that was about.
    I have a friend who has Dyslexia.In researching the disorder it was discovered, by my circle of friends, that there is a form of it where the individual can read normally but think the last word they read in a sentence is the subject of the sentence.

    A person with this form would read the "The brown pony jumped a white fence in an otherwise empty field" and tell you that the sentence is about a field and not a pony. this compound word thing seems to be a variation of this.

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by BeHope View Post
    I have a friend who has Dyslexia.In researching the disorder it was discovered, by my circle of friends, that there is a form of it where the individual can read normally but think the last word they read in a sentence is the subject of the sentence.

    A person with this form would read the "The brown pony jumped a white fence in an otherwise empty field" and tell you that the sentence is about a field and not a pony. this compound word thing seems to be a variation of this.
    Interesting. Do you happen to have a link or other resource I could use?

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Sifr View Post
    Interesting. Do you happen to have a link or other resource I could use?
    not off hand.

    though while looking I did find a form I was unaware of before.

    Scotopic sensitivity syndrome - a form of dyslexia which makes it very difficult for a person to read black text on white paper, particularly when the paper is slightly shiny. Contrary to how it seems to be defined, this is not an optical problem. It is a problem with how the nervous system encodes and decodes visual information.Dyspraxia - a neurological disorder characterised by a marked difficulty in carrying out routine tasks involving balance, fine-motor control, and kinesthetic coordination.

    asa far as the type I am referencing I couldn't find it on a search service but i did find a list of overall symptoms that would include the one I am talking about

    * poor ability to associate symbols with sounds and vice versa
    * frequent word guessing when reading, and an inability to retain meaning
    * confusion when given verbal instructions unaccompanied by visual cues
    * confused sense of spatial orientation, especially by reversing letters and numbers, and losing one's place frequently while reading, or skipping lines
    * having the perception that words, letters and numbers move around, disappear, or get bigger or smaller
    * overlooking punctuation marks or other details of language
    * slow, labored reading and speech may be difficult to understand, words often mispronounced and softly spoken
    * confused sense of right and left handedness
    * math concepts are difficult to learn, excessive daydreaming, and difficulty with time
    * difficulty sequencing items
    * difficulty with jigsaw puzzles; walking a chalk line straightly or other fine motor skill tasks.


    but if you think you have it I would suggest consulting a specialist.


     
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