[ISTP] ISTP, but not a 'mechanical'? Any other ISTP's not fit this stereotype

ISTP, but not a 'mechanical'? Any other ISTP's not fit this stereotype

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This is a discussion on ISTP, but not a 'mechanical'? Any other ISTP's not fit this stereotype within the ISTP Forum - The Mechanics forums, part of the SP's Temperament Forum- The Creators category; Basically, ive typed as an ISTP on every test ive taken. Upon reading about the functions and how they work ...

  1. #1
    Unknown Personality

    ISTP, but not a 'mechanical'? Any other ISTP's not fit this stereotype

    Basically, ive typed as an ISTP on every test ive taken. Upon reading about the functions and how they work I agree that I am Ti dominant backed up with Se, and then all the other functions somewhere after.

    So I know I'm an ISTP. But I dont fit the 'mechanic' stereotype very well. I've never really had an urge to take things apart and see how they work (like cars, computers, TV remotes, pens lol) I dont know whether it is something that would come pretty naturally to me or not, it's just nothing ive ever been particularly interested in or had to do.

    I dont enjoy small, fiddly movements. (I am mildly dyspraxic, which might be why. I used to struggle a lot with writing, tying my shoes, doing up buttons, etc.)

    However, I do enjoy sports and anything that requires big, whole body movements.

    I've always loved climbing, basketball, rugby (im sure if i was an american id love to play what you call football. We just never get to play it over here)
    I have good spacial awareness and catching is always something ive been naturally gifted at. I always want to be a fielder whenever i play baseball, and always wish I could be a Wide Receiver if i ever got to play american football.
    I also enjoy driving and have found such a greater appreciation for motorsports since learning how to drive.

    I appreciation nature, and I although im an introvert I do enjoy being out and doing stuff even though there have been times in life when ive just shut myself away for weeks, sometimes months on end and driven myself into a depression by thinking about the same shit over and over again. (think that's referred to as a Ti Ni loop)

    I figure sports is how I use my Se and 'ISTP troubleshooting skills'.
    Ive always been a pretty laid back, 'quiet' guy, but I always feel like i became a different person when playing a sport I love. I become much more energetic and vocal - I've now come to realise this is because I am engaging my extroverted functions (Se, and to a less extent Fe)

    I'm not interested in taking apart computers and seeing how they work, i am interested in picking apart opposing teams/players and analysing how they work. And then I just use the troubleshooting skills i pick up in playing sports to deal with problems in every day life. :)

    Do any other ISTP's ever feel like they dont fit the stereotype? And if so, which parts? I think I fit every other part except from the 'mechanic', which ive just never been overly interested in.
    Randroth, MrFrenk and Negativity Bias thanked this post.



  2. #2
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    The "mechanic" is a title conferred onto us by the MBTI system- it is not some destiny that all ISTPs must live up to. Merely an easy description for the aggregate of all the characteristics that an ISTP possesses.

    Besides if you spent more than 10 mins thinking, you'd realize that it'd be impossible for everyone to be born an ISTP just to become a mechanic.

  3. #3
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    What @soppixo said. The term "mechanic" is mainly used to describe our way of thinking, not a specific activity. Ti-Se takes apart systems (typically with some sort of basis in the real world--could be economics, could be sports, could be engines) and examines it piece by piece, then puts it back together from the ground up into a cohesive, internally consistent whole where each little cause and effect is understood.

    For a variety of reasons, such as the fact that I'm an ISTP and the fact that I'm a very stereotypically masculine person, people usually tend to assume I'm a lot better with mechanical and technical subjects than I actually am. In reality, I can only do basic maintenance on my car, and I'm only a little better with my computer. I do, however, apply my strengths in sports and in different academic topics that tend to be a little more abstract than people usually associate with ISTP's, such as psychology, science, and economics.
    Lady O.W. Bro, soppixo, Seralya and 1 others thanked this post.

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  5. #4
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    I can't say I'm not mechanical, I've actually worked as a bicycle mechanic, but I'm not all that interested in how many other things work. I've never learned about engines, they don't interest me a whole lot, and I lost interest in computers a long time ago as I realized I wasn't interested in keeping up with technology as it changed so rapidly.

    Some places label ISTPs "artisans". (Others label SPs in general "artisans" and have other words like "crafter" for ISTPs.) So, we're not always "mechanics".

    One thing I find true of at least my own "mechanical" mind is that I learn quickly how systems or products work, and often find that I understand them better than the "experts". For example, I'm researching phone plans or devices and I call a customer service center to ask a question and the person can't really help me in the way I need because I've already figured out the advantages and comparisons of one product to another better than the service rep. So I patiently listen to their spiel, say "thank you", hang up, and go do some more of my own research.

  6. #5
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    I couldn't care less for screws and bolts, to be honest. If I want something fixed, I hire a professional mechanic. I don't understand a thing about motors, mainly because I have never bothered to care.

    I take apart sentences, texts or stories I'm told. I analyse languages, grammatical constructions, thought constructions and legal constructions. I nitpick newspaper articles, proofread restaurant menus, get upset over advertisements, construct cosplay garb (making a 3d wearable item from a 2d artistic drawing is a fun challenge), optimise code, apply legal rules to sob stories, teach languages I started studying 3 months earlier to their native speakers, attempt to codify photography and experiment with cooking. I love verbs and grammar and finding rules from something that looks like a mess. I enjoy finding a connection between seemingly unrelated things (or words) and creating something new with the rules I have found. I struggle with study books because the authors usually want to teach things in a way that doesn't interest me; I only start studying when there's a problem I want to solve, and I have little patience with the basic theory or (at that moment) uninteresting details. For example, people keep telling me that I should learn to speak a language first before getting into grammar rules - why on earth would I want to do talk with people, anyway?

    My mother, who's also an ISTP, knits. Last time I checked, she was able to knit a sock in at least fifteen different ways. She can start from either end, knit a pair simultaneously, create patterns without changing thread and do other neat tricks. She studies ancient techniques and techniques from other continents (apparently the heel is made differently in different countries, for example). Still, she seldom finishes anything that isn't an animal pattern glove for my niece. She starts something, learns a new trick and then she pulls it apart again. She surfs Ravelry and other knit sites for hours for new ideas, new things to try, and can reverse-engineer the patterns from mere pictures.


    ISTPs have a compelling drive to understand the way things work. They're good at logical analysis, and like to use it on practical concerns. They typically have strong powers of reasoning, although they're not interested in theories or concepts unless they can see a practical application. They like to take things apart and see the way they work.
    - Portrait of an ISTP

    Both of us fit the "mechanic" stereotype, because we like to find out how things work. We enjoy finding new ways of doing something, and use logic in making sense of our surroundings. I think the problem is that people read too much into the profile (or the type "name"!): oily rags, bolts and wrenches are not necessary - nor even important.

    Of course the profiles are just generalisations of traits, created to make the function theory more understandable. They are not important per se, either. MBTI, Keirsey, and other Jungian systems are mainly concerned about how people function, how they take in information and how they process it. What sort of information or things they prefer is probably only interesting when it comes to "personal" and "impersonal" matters, which means that whether you enjoy sports or music, cars or flowers, computers or handicrafts is largely irrelevant, as long the thing belongs to the "theoretical, logical, impersonal" sphere. Gossiping about the Joneses' and worrying about the appearances would be a bit different matter. In the same way than one can write the story of Romeo and Juliet in thousands of different ways, one can also write the ISTP profile in numerous ways. Don't get stuck with details or names, just find the stuff that matters.

    In short, ISTPs are supposed to be all about:
    - dominant TI: analysing, troubleshooting, finding logical conclusions or solutions to practical problems.
    - auxiliary SE: living in here and now, experiencing the world in the real, concrete manner; seeing and being interested in what there is (rather than what could be).
    - tertiary NI: being able to generate abstract images, foresee implications, see concepts and patterns in whatever we're interested in.
    - inferior Fe: struggling with remembering to behave accordance with social norms (remembering birthdays etc), being kind to people's feelings, and generally forgetting that people don't usually want the truth even if they claim they do.

    and/or

    I - introverts. Solitude is more relaxing than noisy crowds.
    S - sensors. Living here and now instead of constantly planning the future.
    T - thinkers. Abstract ideas or concrete items are way more interesting than people and their drama.
    P - perceivers. Procrastinators. Things get done when the time's already up, because doing them earlier than that is unnecessary, and because it's wise to keep one's options open in case something changes.

    The rest of the profile texts are there only to make the theory more readable (not everyone enjoys lists), give examples and to generally increase the word count.
    kistp, Negativity Bias, Ellis Bell and 4 others thanked this post.

  7. #6
    INTP - The Thinkers

    I knew 2 ISTPs who were good at skilled drawing and not mechanics.

    I think you're right about ISTPs. They analyze something, see how it works and use that skill (drawing or mechanics).
    Seralya and petitpèlerin thanked this post.

  8. #7
    ENTP - The Visionaries

    The true test of ISTPness is becoming a mechanic. And that's my final word on this. You are either an ISTP or you're not and it's not an easy club to get into. You either have it or you don't, so if you don't you better sit the fuck down, be some other type, and stop getting in the way of awesome ISTPs as we don't got the time for you skallywags. Over & out.

  9. #8
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by FaitAccompli View Post
    The true test of ISTPness is becoming a mechanic. And that's my final word on this. You are either an ISTP or you're not and it's not an easy club to get into. You either have it or you don't, so if you don't you better sit the fuck down, be some other type, and stop getting in the way of awesome ISTPs as we don't got the time for you skallywags. Over & out.
    I was waiting for this sort of a reply, because I do see a lot of this attitude here. Sometimes it looks like there'd be a kiddie competition going on about who's the most blunt and impolite mecha-über-stereotype-ISTP-man/person of these forums. Funny, that this time the competition was opened by a self-proclaimed ESTP.

    ---

    Apropos stereotypes that do or do not match - I sometimes wonder if I have too much N and too little S going on. I don't want to be impolite to sensible people or hurt my friends' feelings, instead I try to avoid it when possible. I don't enjoy doing thins alone, either - I never seem to be actually going anywhere if there's nobody to push me on. Either the stereotype of the harsh loner that goes sky-diving alone after verbally mopping the floor with morons and of course building the aeroplane himself isn't totally accurate, or I am just not "true" enough ISTP to be part of "the awesome mecha gang".

    I'm not sure if I much mind, though, either way.
    Ellis Bell thanked this post.

  10. #9
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by Seralya View Post
    I was waiting for this sort of a reply, because I do see a lot of this attitude here. Sometimes it looks like there'd be a kiddie competition going on about who's the most blunt and impolite mecha-über-stereotype-ISTP-man/person of these forums. Funny, that this time the competition was opened by a self-proclaimed ESTP.
    I wasn't even going to respond to such an asinine statement. So I'm not, I'm responding to yours, and agreeing with it.

    Edit: the "true test" of an ISTP is not that they prove themselves somehow, it's that they fit the cognitive profile of Ti-Se-Ni-Fe. ISTP is not a badge of honor, it's merely a description of the way we tend to perceive and interpret things and the pattern of our behavior.
    Last edited by petitpèlerin; 08-18-2013 at 08:11 AM.
    Seralya, kistp and stoicBrit thanked this post.

  11. #10
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    to repeat what's been said before, ISTPs may be literal, but we are not literally mechanics. I'm like @Seralya ; one of my areas of interest is grammar, too (I'm lucky enough that I found a career path where I got to use one of my obsessions). on the other hand, my ISTP grandfather, for example, took up (and took apart, figuratively) computers when he was in his 50s; his interest lay in figuring out how it worked and what to do with it, how the individual parts combined together make up the whole. A garment might fit the model perfectly, but it might not fit perfectly on you--so you have to make some adjustments to it to make it work.
    Seralya and Negativity Bias thanked this post.


     
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