Your Personal Understanding of Differentiation

Your Personal Understanding of Differentiation

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This is a discussion on Your Personal Understanding of Differentiation within the Jungian Theory forums, part of the Other Personality Theories category; Firstly, Jung speaks of the superior function as the function that is most differentiated. While we all have an idea ...

  1. #1

    Your Personal Understanding of Differentiation

    Firstly, Jung speaks of the superior function as the function that is most differentiated. While we all have an idea of what that means (or at least can look up the definition of the word if we're unfamiliar with it), what I wonder is how each individual personally understands the idea of a "most differentiated" function.

    Question 1: How are you personally able to discern differentiation when it comes to functions? How do you personally interpret what Jung means by this?

    Secondly, I've heard some say that a function that isn't differentiated gets almost clouded by other functions and can't really stand on its own.

    Question 2: What are characteristics of a differentiated function?
    AnneM and Terracraft thanked this post.



  2. #2

    It'll be the most obvious function. The one which stands out most clearly. And I feel that aptly answers both questions.

  3. #3

    I understand a differentiated function to be one that you can control and effectively use. It doesn't control you, it doesn't run away with you, it's available when you need it, it can be managed. I like to think of functions as dimmer switches. A differentiated function has a switch that is firmly adjustable. You touch it, and it sets to the level you want. An undifferentiated function switch, when touched, either doesn't move, or moves wildly to a setting you don't want. Does that make sense? I'm always trying to use analogies like this, and trying to get my ISFP contractor husband to help me with them. But I don't know the right terminology!!
    brightflashes and Aridela thanked this post.

  4. #4

    @AnneM

    You are excessively clear with your explanation. : )
    AnneM thanked this post.

  5. #5

    Quote Originally Posted by brightflashes View Post
    @AnneM

    You are excessively clear with your explanation. : )
    You mean, you're not CONFUSED or CONCERNED? You don't need more CLARITY?
    brightflashes thanked this post.

  6. #6

    I think differentiation is what you do to appear special or unique from other people like dressing, talking and acting not same as them

  7. #7

    Differentiation is when you take the derivative of a function.

    In a polynomial function, the power rule will cause the leading term to decrease its order by one with each derivative until the result is becomes 0.

    Ex:

    f(x) = 3x^2

    f'(x) = 6x

    f''(x) = 6

    f'''(x) = 0

    Since Calculus is the study of change, Jung is clearly saying that most differentiated function is the one that changes the slowest relative to all other functions. In this case, the third derivative and all subsequent derivatives is a function of 0 which indicates no change. Since Jung is a psychology major, he only took psychology Calculus, so he never learned about the transcendental functions like trigonometric or logarithmic functions. So it stands that Jung assumed that taking iterated derivatives of any function would eventually result in derivatives of zero. Thus, all humans have a most differentiated function. This mathematical oversight allowed for the belief that every human being could be easily fit into 16 types. The lesson here is to teach our psychology majors rigorous math courses with a lot of triangles and exponential growth.
    Aridela and brightflashes thanked this post.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by brightflashes View Post
    Firstly, Jung speaks of the superior function as the function that is most differentiated. While we all have an idea of what that means (or at least can look up the definition of the word if we're unfamiliar with it), what I wonder is how each individual personally understands the idea of a "most differentiated" function.

    Question 1: How are you personally able to discern differentiation when it comes to functions? How do you personally interpret what Jung means by this?

    Secondly, I've heard some say that a function that isn't differentiated gets almost clouded by other functions and can't really stand on its own.

    Question 2: What are characteristics of a differentiated function?
    I suppose the superior function is the one you default to most of the time; the function you're most comfortable with.

    I notice this becomes more obvious when in fight/flight situations when I'm expected to act quickly, I invariably default to Ti. Or what I perceive as Ti.

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandmaster Yoda View Post
    Differentiation is when you take the derivative of a function.

    In a polynomial function, the power rule will cause the leading term to decrease its order by one with each derivative until the result is becomes 0.

    Ex:

    f(x) = 3x^2

    f'(x) = 6x

    f''(x) = 6

    f'''(x) = 0

    Since Calculus is the study of change, Jung is clearly saying that most differentiated function is the one that changes the slowest relative to all other functions. In this case, the third derivative and all subsequent derivatives is a function of 0 which indicates no change. Since Jung is a psychology major, he only took psychology Calculus, so he never learned about the transcendental functions like trigonometric or logarithmic functions. So it stands that Jung assumed that taking iterated derivatives of any function would eventually result in derivatives of zero. Thus, all humans have a most differentiated function. This mathematical oversight allowed for the belief that every human being could be easily fit into 16 types. The lesson here is to teach our psychology majors rigorous math courses with a lot of triangles and exponential growth.
    Seeing that Jung's schooling was very different to today's schooling chances are he skipped on Maths altogether.
    Last edited by Aridela; 07-12-2019 at 08:13 AM. Reason: Used wrong name :P Don't do this when dating someone
    Grandmaster Yoda thanked this post.

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Aridela View Post
    Seeing that Jung's schooling was very different to today's schooling chances are he skipped on Maths altogether.
    According to Wikipedia he wanted to become an archeologist. Which means he could have discovered numerous dinosaur fossils very early on and gained a lot of recognition for his work. Maybe Godzilla wouldn't have been dragging his tail on the ground. Hmm.


     
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