Have you ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder? - Page 2

Have you ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder?

View Poll Results: If you have, please answer by choosing your type below.

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    3 1.38%
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    2 0.92%
  • ESFP

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    4 1.84%
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    13 5.99%
  • ENFP

    18 8.29%
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    39 17.97%
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    16 7.37%
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    7 3.23%
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    41 18.89%
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    58 26.73%
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This is a discussion on Have you ever been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder? within the Member Polls forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; I was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder about 6 years ago towards the end of college. I suspected I had ...

  1. #11

    I was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder about 6 years ago towards the end of college. I suspected I had something like that for a few years beforehand and made an effort to curb it with a lot of exercise i.e. running, cycling, hiking which, for the most part, was very successful. Then, due to unemployment, and a string of class presentations and debates, I realized I couldn't self-moderate anymore. My college counselor put me through about 6 months of cognitive behavioral therapy and taught me some handy mantras for behavior modification (that I still use ocassionally). Overall, I'm glad I didn't have to take any prescription drugs - and very thankful I was directly in control of my self-improvement. While I still slip and hiccup from time to time, my self-confidence has increased and I've learned how to sooth my anxiety and calm bouts of panic.
    Promethea and ImminentThunder thanked this post.

  2. #12

    That's another benefit with CBT and similar methods, the sense of being in control. I think by taking meds you develop an external locus of control as they say, and become more vulnerable to anxiety and depression, and as a consequence more dependent on the meds.

  3. #13

    Yep, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder.

    I'm a bundle of nerves.
    Promethea, ImminentThunder and Enkidu thanked this post.

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  5. #14

    You know you shouldn't let other people make you nervous. I mean they're looking at funny animal clips on YouTube and the Eurovision Song Contest on TV. I think it helps to think like that even though it doesn't fix the problem altogether.

    I also have opera as a way to release nervous energy. Really intense and tragic stuff like Wagner and Verdi. You'd think that would make it worse but I feel much better afterwards.
    Mulberries thanked this post.

  6. #15

    Quote Originally Posted by Staffan View Post
    That's another benefit with CBT and similar methods, the sense of being in control. I think by taking meds you develop an external locus of control as they say, and become more vulnerable to anxiety and depression, and as a consequence more dependent on the meds.
    I dunno if I agree with that.

    Usually you shouldn't be going on meds unless you are already disabled enough by the anxiety that you have no other option, and the meds should just take the edge off so that you can learn to do the internal work necessary to live without the meds (if it's not purely a brain chemical imbalance causing the problem). IOW, unless there's a serious imbalance that needs physical remedy, it's just a stopgap measure to help you get through the problem until you can internalize your power and control over your life.

    Anxiety can actually partly be a wiring issue, kind of like introversion, from how I see it -- at least some kinds of anxiety.
    Promethea, ImminentThunder and intrasearching thanked this post.

  7. #16

    Quote Originally Posted by Staffan View Post
    Never heard of pituitary adenoma before. Could it be related to GAD given that the pituitary regulates hormones?
    It might exacerbate the symptoms but while I've only recently been diagnosed with GAD I've been symptomatic for most of my life.

    A pituitary adenoma is a benign hormone secreting tumor.
    Staffan thanked this post.

  8. #17

    My first psychologist told me there was absolutely nothing wrong with me, that my experiences were within the norm, etc. The next one said I have PTSD and supported the idea of pharmaceutical intervention (disagreed with him). The next one was against the whole over-pathologizing of people and shared my sentiment that, though I was experiencing some anxiety and depression off and on, I was fine and didn't need a label or a prescription. However, one day in discussion I mentioned thinking I had OCD (as I had thought for probably a decade) and he said "Yeah, you seem to have a bit of it." So, I suppose I was "diagnosed" with OCD.

    I have had many panic attacks, but haven't had one in five years (and I feel SO thankful, as I have felt extremely anxious since then and feared impending panic attacks), but most of the time I am just a bit susceptible to anxiety. Most often my anxiety is only mildly unsettling, and I know how to ride emotions now. But I still feel very lucky that my body isn't throwing me the sort of anxiety it did five years ago. I felt extremely anxious early this morning, which was out of the ordinary for me. I am usually pretty relaxed. It was the worst feeling. It finally went away after a couple hours. I hate anxiety, but I am learning to ride it as an ephemeral part of life that demands respect.

    Additionally, I'd like to say that I am thankful to have found this thread. Having been shaken up by some bad anxiety this morning (I only slept three hours because of it) it feels comforting to read about your experiences and successes. Makes me feel less hopeless/alone.
    Jennywocky, Skum, ImminentThunder and 1 others thanked this post.

  9. #18

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennywocky View Post
    I dunno if I agree with that.

    Usually you shouldn't be going on meds unless you are already disabled enough by the anxiety that you have no other option, and the meds should just take the edge off so that you can learn to do the internal work necessary to live without the meds (if it's not purely a brain chemical imbalance causing the problem). IOW, unless there's a serious imbalance that needs physical remedy, it's just a stopgap measure to help you get through the problem until you can internalize your power and control over your life.

    Anxiety can actually partly be a wiring issue, kind of like introversion, from how I see it -- at least some kinds of anxiety.
    Well that's the idea but how often does that happen in real life? I know 10 percent of the population in Sweden is on psychopharmaceuticals and it's been like that for God knows how long. If most people would get off their meds witin 5 years or so it would mean that they would have to be replaced with another 10 percent and they in turn with another 10 percent. This would mean that an overwhelming majority would be diagnosed. According to Wikipedia 46 percent of all Americans "qualifies for a mental illness at some point". But that's an estimate not the actual number of people that gets diagnosed which must be lower.

    So it seems like the only possible conclusion is that a smaller group of people get stuck on their pills. Given that external locus has been linked to anxiety and depression it just might be that the pills become an obstacle to complete recovery.

  10. #19

    Quote Originally Posted by Promethea View Post
    When I was much younger, I was diagnosed with Social Anxiety.. but the past couple of diagnoses have been Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and one GP tried to tell me I'm bipolar. I said naw man, I'm just passionate.

    Anyway, I have taken in the past: zoloft, paxil, buspar, celexa, then various benzos. I was addicted to benzos and put myself in w/d cold turkey to get the shit out of my system. It was the worst hell I have ever been through.

    I learned something about benzos -- they will end up making your anxiety -worse- and they will not allow you to learn to deal with it on your own. Its counterproductive. I agree with what jennywocky said about pills being a last resort only when you can't function basically.

    I'm writing an e-book on anxiety, but I have reached a point where I'm stuck, because I absolutely cannot describe how to meditate. Its something I learned to do in the midst of my worst panic attack ever. Its like my mind/body needed it as a defense at the time, and I was able to return to that state after, since I'd learned.

    Anyway, my personality type is probably intp.
    I too agree with Jennywocky on how it should work; I'm just not sure that is how it works in most cases.

    Yes, meditation definitely works against anxiety and stress and all sorts of problems. But do you really need to explain exactly how you do it? People probably vary in how they meditate anyhow so an exact description may not be necessary.

  11. #20

    Quote Originally Posted by Staffan View Post
    Well that's the idea but how often does that happen in real life? I know 10 percent of the population in Sweden is on psychopharmaceuticals and it's been like that for God knows how long. If most people would get off their meds witin 5 years or so it would mean that they would have to be replaced with another 10 percent and they in turn with another 10 percent. This would mean that an overwhelming majority would be diagnosed. According to Wikipedia 46 percent of all Americans "qualifies for a mental illness at some point". But that's an estimate not the actual number of people that gets diagnosed which must be lower.
    Quote Originally Posted by Staffan View Post
    I too agree with Jennywocky on how it should work; I'm just not sure that is how it works in most cases.
    Yeah, while I know how it should work, I am not sure how it works in reality. I hear conflicting stories. My own experience has been really good, with one psychiatrist and two therapists. But I've heard some horror stories as well from the other side of the spectrum. It's hard to tell. Just because there are a number of hacks/quacks out there doesn't mean there are no stellar docs either, but it's a careful balance.

    Psychiatry is an odd kind of treatment profession; unlike routine medicine (or at least to a much more profound degree than medicine), the therapist is not in charge of the real cure, the patient is. Unless the malady is 100% biological, then the patient has to work toward his or her own health and the therapist/psychiatrist can only guide and inform. A doctor can fix your illness with medicine and surgery, a mechanic can fix your car using tools of the trade and replacing parts, but the therapist typically cannot make a patient change.
    Staffan thanked this post.


     
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