Is it necessary to be comfortable with one's type in order to be that type?

Is it necessary to be comfortable with one's type in order to be that type?

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This is a discussion on Is it necessary to be comfortable with one's type in order to be that type? within the Myers Briggs Forum forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; By "comfortable," I mean to accept without resistance the nature of one's type, i.e., the cognitive functions and how they ...

  1. #1

    Is it necessary to be comfortable with one's type in order to be that type?

    By "comfortable," I mean to accept without resistance the nature of one's type, i.e., the cognitive functions and how they manifest based on stacking. For the sake of this discussion, I'm only talking about an inner (mental, psychological, neurological) feeling of ease and naturalness with one's cognitive type.

    As far as the factors that contribute to one's "comfort-ability" with their type, I'm barring:

    1.) Inadequate profile descriptions > whether due to (personal/social/cultural) type bias, a lack of complete, in-depth and nuanced information (which could lead to misattributing certain traits to the wrong type), or being too skewed towards a certain demographic (college students, corporate world, pinterest/tumblr addicts obsessed with fanciful, hyperbolic archetypes).

    2.) One's upbringing > e.g., being an XNTP raised by XSFJs and therefore being exceptionally self-conscious about how their facility with Fe or lack there of is perceived.

    3.) Projection of an idealized self > who you wish you were/aspire to be but aren't.

    I'm an ENTJ with combined inattentive/hyperactive-impulsive ADHD and can therefore (theoretically, in so much as there are correlations between Ne/Se and "ADD"/ADHD) ostensibly appear to be an ENTP or ESTP, depending on the context. Of the two, I relate more to the ENTP and for a while, went back and forth over the plausibility of that being my type until I realized (thanks in part to the help of an ENTP friend of 15 years) that though many of our behaviors are similar, our thinking is still different, sometimes egregiously so.

    My ENTP mate seems fine with a "chaotic" living space; it's not that he doesn't like things to be neat, tidy and organized, he's just also completely OK, unfazed and unbothered when they are not--for him, it's "organized chaos." When I'm hyper-focusing on a particular idea/project/endeavor, I can let things get messy and disheveled, but everytime I become re-attentive to the environment, I can't help but notice and be irritated by every flaw, every item out of place, everything that must be corrected, to the point where it becomes stress inducing to ignore it any further. For me, a clear, well organized space = a clearer, more organized mind. My ENTP mate doesn't mind inviting people into a crazy, hellish looking environment but I, on the few occasions where there was no other choice, was embarrassed, extremely self-conscious and worried that it would reflect poorly on my ability to "keep it together."

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that a part of being an ENTP was possessing a certain comfort with various brands of environmental disorder (unconscious inferior Si); The few people I know who are definitively ENTPs seem to be quite OK with it. Even I can use "chaos" to my benefit if so inclined, but I'd much rather everything be well structured. I know that there is intra-type diversity but what kind of ENTP would be an environmental control freak? In order to be an ENTP, shouldn't there be an inner "OKness" with being prone to dishevelment?

    It just seems to me that one should possess an inner peace with their type; And inner peace primarily via acceptance, which doesn't mean that it must be actively liked or that certain maladaptive things can't be changed--fundamentally, we should be OK with who we are. But if a cognitive function/stacking causes out and out distress, is that not potentially a sign that one is mistyped?
    ANAXEL thanked this post.



  2. #2

    How would function stacking CAUSE out and out distress?
    I would suppose only if we dictate our behavior and life decisions after what the theory suggests.
    In which case, we would still find ourselves in distress even if we dictate our behavior according to the right type.
    Why?
    Because the theory is not finished. This is still under development and its practical aspects are all found when the theory directs us to basic principles of social life. And what's a basic principle of the MBTI? To understand where others are coming from and who we are also, to give the benefit of the doubt to others instead of going through our everyday lives with narrow judge-mentality and incorrect assumptions.

    The ideal practice of Jungian theory is to see an individual in an interrupted, natural state, and then discern why they behave that way.
    The manipulation of someone's behavior in accord to the theory is something that I would HIGHLY discourage for the time being.

    We don't need to be at inner peace with our type, or even in harmony with it.
    The important thing is to FIRST be in inner peace with who we are and THEN type ourselves.
    (And for the love of God, don't type yourself through tests)

  3. #3

    Quote Originally Posted by ANAXEL View Post
    How would function stacking CAUSE out and out distress?
    I would suppose only if we dictate our behavior and life decisions after what the theory suggests.
    In which case, we would still find ourselves in distress even if we dictate our behavior according to the right type.
    Why?
    Because the theory is not finished. This is still under development and its practical aspects are all found when the theory directs us to basic principles of social life. And what's a basic principle of the MBTI? To understand where others are coming from and who we are also, to give the benefit of the doubt to others instead of going through our everyday lives with narrow judge-mentality and incorrect assumptions.
    Prior to learning about Jungian cognitive functions/MBTI/Socionics and for as long as I can remember, I've been an environmental control freak and various states of disorder have always grated on my ability to function properly. So yeah, my control issues, the more pressing/important issue worthy of attention, exists outside of personality type theory. But, at least, if I know what my correct type is, I can begin to (first) acknowledge and (second) accept what personality traits (potential strengths and shortcomings, all relative btw) come with it, which is vital for any subsequent development and growth. If I know that it's natural for my type to project order and structure, to find flaws and optimize, etc..., then I feel "normal". Now my "normal" may be abnormal to those around me, and subsequently present various problems, but at the very least, "Te" objectively acknowledges and qualifies my existence within a larger system, which is validating. lol

    Quote Originally Posted by ANAXEL View Post
    The ideal practice of Jungian theory is to see an individual in an interrupted, natural state, and then discern why they behave that way.
    The manipulation of someone's behavior in accord to the theory is something that I would HIGHLY discourage for the time being.
    I'd say that someone attempting to alter their core is a problem and defeats the whole purpose of personality type theory; But I don't see a problem with slight behavioral modifications. Making a conscious effort to not talk over ISFJs or be cavalierly dismissive of their points of view, for example, can go over rather well. lol

    Quote Originally Posted by ANAXEL View Post
    We don't need to be at inner peace with our type, or even in harmony with it.
    The important thing is to FIRST be in inner peace with who we are and THEN type ourselves.
    (And for the love of God, don't type yourself through tests)
    Yeah, I think this is ideal albeit a bit unrealistic; I first took the official MBTI tool in college, while I was depressed, though I didn't realize it at the time. Then, I (inaccurately) saw depression as only crying, sleeping all day, and inactivity, which were anathema to me. There are many people who, for various reasons, are out of touch with "who they are" without consciously knowing it; An Fi and Ti dominant will, respectively, struggle less with their personal values and reasons than an Fe and Te dominant, which can give the former a greater sense of "who they are (internally)," as individuals, and what they stand for. Fe and Te dominants are more comfortable accessing reliable external, objective metrics that affirm and reaffirm their identities, which is why systems like MBTI are appealing and why their limitations become evident, rather quickly (IMO, usually not comprehensive enough, which can cause mistypes). The point is that, as of now, mistypes are inevitable, which is why I believe "mistyping" deserves just as much attention as "typing" does.
    ANAXEL thanked this post.

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