Why is it “unethical” to base hiring decisions on MBTI? - Page 2

Why is it “unethical” to base hiring decisions on MBTI?

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This is a discussion on Why is it “unethical” to base hiring decisions on MBTI? within the Myers Briggs Forum forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; People have been turned down based on their horoscopes so anything and everything is possible these days....

  1. #11

    People have been turned down based on their horoscopes so anything and everything is possible these days.

  2. #12

    Quote Originally Posted by Janna View Post
    MBTI supposedly predicts job success quite poorly, which makes sense to me. We don't go around doing only things that we naturally prefer; people have skills and manners and all sorts of motivations to do what's needed in a job.
    It's also a case of options. Presumably, the idea is to use present facts correlated with future success in the job to predict that success (because obviously, you can't know that outright). But given that you have a broad choice of highly correlated facts -- grades, degrees, working history, recommendations, personal interview -- it just makes no sense to use relatively poorly correlated things like MBTI. You're needlessly not doing as well as you could be.

  3. #13
    ISTP

    It matters little whether it's unethical or not. That might be a valid question to ask when you can first establish that hiring based on MBTI results actually works.

    But it doesn't. Why? Because MBTI is not a measure of skill, it is a measure of cognition and "personality." Someone having the 'right personality' doesn't mean they are skilled. And someone having the 'wrong personality,' well.. that's what job interviews are for. An MBTI test shouldn't surprise you.

    ~~~

    Also, I would be VERY skeptical of those test results. People adjust their answers to company climate to 'score better,' and the description of "on the spot" juggling linguistic theory with personal information of the client is just begging for people who are successful at this to test at ENxP, because this is often how the type is described: a genius with quick 'on the spot' information. Truth is, extroverts of pretty much any type might be very capable at this, and some introverts as well. They will still test as ENxP's, especially when the test comes from the company, but you'd be testing skill, not cognition. Company atmosphere-based bias is real.

    Overall, I say you're better off working with the Big 5 for this. A combination of High Extroversion, High Openness, High Conscientiousness, and Low Neuroticism (to handle the stress well) will do wonders. I believe High Conscientiousness is important, as the job seems to require quite the diligent character, something that the ENxP profiles in the MBTI lack. If anything, with the combination of High Conscientiousness and Low Neuroticism, you're often looking at ExxJ profiles.
    Suntide thanked this post.

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  5. #14
    INTP

    Quote Originally Posted by Daeva View Post
    I say you're better off working with the Big 5 for this.
    If the premise is that it's unethical for the potential employer to dive into the applicants' private personality, it makes no difference whether it's Big 5, MBTI or ennagram.

    Of those three, I myself would be much more inclined to lie when taking a Big 5 test when applying for a job. Big 5 is clearly attempting to find what the "good" attributes of my personality are and what the "bad" ones would be. I simply wouldn't confess to the bad ones. This is why I prefer MBTI and enneagram: there are no good and bad answers, those models recognize that there are problems and virtues that correlate with each type.

  6. #15
    ISTP

    Quote Originally Posted by Janna View Post
    If the premise is that it's unethical for the potential employer to dive into the applicants' private personality, it makes no difference whether it's Big 5, MBTI or ennagram.

    Of those three, I myself would be much more inclined to lie when taking a Big 5 test when applying for a job. Big 5 is clearly attempting to find what the "good" attributes of my personality are and what the "bad" ones would be. I simply wouldn't confess to the bad ones. This is why I prefer MBTI and enneagram: there are no good and bad answers, those models recognize that there are problems and virtues that correlate with each type.
    I wasn't operating under that premise, though. The OP asked if it was ethical - at all - based on his specifics and I answered that it is irrelevant if you can't first establish whether it works. Now, one could argue that it could be unethical no matter if it works or not, but personally I find it unethical to employ tactics that aren't proven to work - especially when gambling with other people's resources (including time as a resource).

    Lying on personality tests happens all the time, consciously or not, which is why I find the 'good use' of them to be.. pretty much nonexistent. But I say if you absolutely must use one, then go for the one where you can have a measure of 'success' in scoring a certain way. Cheating or lying in interviews or on tests will never end though. It's why, at the end of the day, it is in-person interviews and trials that make or break the candidate.

  7. #16
    INTP

    Yeah, I know you weren't operating under that premise, neither am I really. If I could, I would love to give potential recruits the MBTI test. Not because I thought it guarantees anything, but because I believe that it would help me to ask them the right kind of questions in the next interview.

    I see how using MBTI as a tool in a hiring process can be considered unethical, but also using Big Five or any other way of trying to get into the applicant's personality is just as unethical. Also, it's true that applicants often lie about their personalities in job interviews, whether or not a formal test is involved. If testing in itself is a bit iffy from an ethical point of view, lying in those tests is probably no worse.

    What I simply meant was that while most recruitment processes after a certain level contain a personality assessment of some kind, I would personally be more inclined to be honest in an MBTI test, where the questions don't seem to have "right" or "wrong" answers, than I would be in a Big 5 test, where you can easily see if you're putting yourself in a "healthy" or "troubled" box.

  8. #17

    Yeah, I don't think there's too many people out there who don't answer employment or pre-employment 'personality assessments' with the answers that the employers want to hear. I highly doubt an MBTI test, or any personality test really, would yield 100% honest and accurate results under those circumstances. It's just not the same as taking it at home for fun out of personal interest, where there's nothing to lose.

  9. #18
    INFP - The Idealists

    Here's a link to the Myers and Briggs Foundation page that covers ethics within a workplace environment.
    https://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-...consultant.htm


     
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