"An intuitive can be a sensor, but a sensor can't be an intuitive." - Page 10

"An intuitive can be a sensor, but a sensor can't be an intuitive."

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This is a discussion on "An intuitive can be a sensor, but a sensor can't be an intuitive." within the Myers Briggs Forum forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; Originally Posted by niss Only to be clear - details are the realm of the introvert. Whether Ni, Si, Fi, ...

  1. #91
    ENFP - The Inspirers


    Quote Originally Posted by niss View Post
    Only to be clear - details are the realm of the introvert. Whether Ni, Si, Fi, or Ti, when in the dominant position, the individual will be more narrowly focused.
    small correction: perfectionism is the realm of the introvert. all four introverted functions are oriented toward internal standards by which they evaluate themselves and the world. on the other hand, details, imo, are more Si, Se and Te. for example, an ESFP notices lots of details, but the don't generally feel compelled to make sure all of those details are in place, lining up with a set of principles, having "all the dominoes in a row", etc. they are more about "what's the point?" and "how do I get this done so I can move onto the next thing?"




  2. #92
    Unknown Personality

    Yep

  3. #93

    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsman of Mana View Post
    yes. the notion that an Intuitive can turn around and do what a Sensor does is ridiculous. that shit is soooo tiring
    I can, I just can't do it for more than say...10-15 minutes at a time.
    Swordsman of Mana thanked this post.

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  5. #94

    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl28 View Post
    I don't need all the extra details, even when describing personal experiences. My wife is an ISTJ.

    She thinks I need all this extraneous data when she describes personal experiences. I can infer about 80% of what she tells me. I'm focused on just the gems buried in all that waste rock.

    If I'm going to get super detailed, it's going to be about theoretical constructs, something that my wife HATES. Example: she can't stand the concept of her computer desktop. Her computer file system isn't REAL...or is it? Don't even get her started on the cloud!
    Tbh I can't relate to this. I'm more concerned with knowing the core of issues and uninterested in repetition of redundant details situations imply, but I don't attribute this to either sensing or intuition. Fi doms for example can go into great detail about their experiences and topics they feel strongly about and it has nothing to do with them being sensor or not.

    Furthermore I don't buy division of topics into 'intuitive' and 'sensor' ones (maybe due to me being a researcher in the fields of theory of translation and theoretical linguistics), as it is a superficial divide which doesn't reflect cognition at all.
    ...
    Only now did I notice this is Myers Briggs forum. Inattentive ISTJ Guess now I understand the source of my confusion with topic discussed.

  6. #95
    Unknown

    Quote Originally Posted by Swordsman of Mana View Post
    small correction: perfectionism is the realm of the introvert. all four introverted functions are oriented toward internal standards by which they evaluate themselves and the world. on the other hand, details, imo, are more Si, Se and Te. for example, an ESFP notices lots of details, but the don't generally feel compelled to make sure all of those details are in place, lining up with a set of principles, having "all the dominoes in a row", etc. they are more about "what's the point?" and "how do I get this done so I can move onto the next thing?"
    Sort of.

    The attention to detail inherent in the introvert can often result in perfectionism, but that isn't always the case.

    While an extrovert can notice and become detail oriented about things that are important to them, their general mode of operation is to gloss over the details, get the gist of the idea, and move on. There is much more to see, more interactions to be had.

    In contrast, the introvert will regulate the amount of stimulation received more carefully, and will shut down quicker in a more stimulating environment - or will find a way that they can mentally block out certain stimuli, so as to be able to focus on a few things.

    It varies somewhat between individuals, but an introvert will have a narrower, more in depth focus, while an extrovert will have a broader, wider focus - all else being equal. This is easier to see when comparing people of similar types (extrovert vs. introvert; ESTJ/ISTJ, ENFP/INFP, etc.)

    This is what makes the introvert tend to perfectionism, and is why you see certain fields dominated by introverts or by extroverts.
    Last edited by niss; 01-25-2015 at 04:01 AM.
    Swordsman of Mana thanked this post.

  7. #96
    Unknown

    Quote Originally Posted by Cryo View Post
    Tbh I can't relate to this. I'm more concerned with knowing the core of issues and uninterested in repetition of redundant details situations imply, but I don't attribute this to either sensing or intuition. Fi doms for example can go into great detail about their experiences and topics they feel strongly about and it has nothing to do with them being sensor or not.

    Furthermore I don't buy division of topics into 'intuitive' and 'sensor' ones (maybe due to me being a researcher in the fields of theory of translation and theoretical linguistics), as it is a superficial divide which doesn't reflect cognition at all.
    ...
    Only now did I notice this is Myers Briggs forum. Inattentive ISTJ Guess now I understand the source of my confusion with topic discussed.
    He didn't say redundant details; that's an important distinction, as no one likes redundant information.

    Instead, he is inferring information which his wife has not yet shared in the story. He is describing classic Si-dom vs. Ne-dom interactions.

  8. #97

    Quote Originally Posted by niss View Post
    He didn't say redundant details; that's an important distinction, as no one likes redundant information.

    Instead, he is inferring information which his wife has not yet shared in the story. He is describing classic Si-dom vs. Ne-dom interactions.
    Not really. He said extraneous data which is contextually synonymous to redundant. Both can imply that the data person provides is inferred by the receiving end subtextually, without the former person being specifically verbose about it.

  9. #98
    Unknown

    Quote Originally Posted by Cryo View Post
    Not really. He said extraneous data which is contextually synonymous to redundant. Both can imply that the data person provides is inferred by the receiving end subtextually, without the former person being specifically verbose about it.
    Sorry, but I disagree.

    Extraneous = unnecessary

    Redundant = repetitious

    Particularly in this context.

  10. #99

    Quote Originally Posted by niss View Post
    Sorry, but I disagree.

    Extraneous = unnecessary

    Redundant = repetitious

    Particularly in this context.
    Well. Guess it's just semantics then. I meant redundant as:
    Adj. 1. redundant - more than is needed, desired, or required;
    exceeding what is usual or necessary;
    characterized by superabundance or superfluity;
    predictable.


     
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