[Psychology News] Hear the one about men being funnier than women? Study shows gender - Page 4

[Psychology News] Hear the one about men being funnier than women? Study shows gender

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This is a discussion on [Psychology News] Hear the one about men being funnier than women? Study shows gender within the Psychology News Forum forums, part of the General Psychology category; Originally Posted by WildRaspberries I think in (post)modern society, it's much harder to really differentiate between what is mainstream and ...

  1. #31

    Quote Originally Posted by WildRaspberries View Post
    I think in (post)modern society, it's much harder to really differentiate between what is mainstream and what is not mainstream, as even traditionally "non-mainstream" things have been commodified and commercialised. I think it can be argued that women find it harder to imitate humour in a patriarchal society as there is a subconcious psychological pushback from their innate selves not to conform, and to instead express their unique selves and insights (although this is often buried deep and masked).

    What would be your examples of mainstream and non-mainstream humour?
    Lol i doubt i can make an example of that out of the blue.

    I see as mainstream whatever i see daily on tv and social media and i see women talking a lot or laughing about it along with men who follow the trend to get laid or because they got many female friends and they ve adapted to their ways as ive said earlier.
    I see as mainstream all those "humorous" behaviors that are repeatitive and somehow each one of them believes they are unique but they are all the same.

    I see as mainstream whatever stays on surface and is not digged enough, because taking the trend as raw and not changing it at all is all about keeping the mainstream going.

    As for not mainstream I see whichever kind of humor differs from the above, no matter how slight that change is. I see it as something different be it better or worse.

    This kind of humor should be individialistic and one that goes well with your general charachter.
    What kind of humor interactions do you value more (take your own preference about humor aside), those that follow the general trend or those who seem more original and display a stronger charachter?
    Wiz thanked this post.

  2. #32

    Quote Originally Posted by WildRaspberries View Post
    From a feminist perspective, men were the founders and developers of mainstream humour as it is seen in society, and we are surrounded by this humour throughout our lives.
    This doesn't make sense. You find response and practice of humor in monkeys and other animals. It's an ancient trait that precedes humans.

    What we find funny is socially constructed.
    Also doesn't make sense. If this was the case, then humor wouldn't translate across cultures, but it does. Pre media/internet people were still able to joke around regardless of being pre-programmed. It's only the last 50 years we've been exposed to different types of humor. I hardly think that's enough time to reprogram so many different cultures and aspects of societies with the force and precision needed to implement universal socially constructed comedic "rules"—as it essentially is.

    You also have native tribes that have been culturally and socially isolated from other humans, yet their humor is not particularly different to the rest of us, which would suggest a biological aspect your theory ignores.

    And as far as socially constructed theories of humor, it doesn't fit with how some people are biologically less or more able to understand for instance sarcasm—or humor in general. This being the case suggests that there are at least some biological/natural aspect to humor.

    Men find other men funnier as they can relate to their humour more.
    No, a lot of women are funnier than a lot of men, regardless of content of the jokes. On average however, it doesn't seem to be the case. And to test your claim then in theory, women could just tell male jokes and be regarded equally as funny?

    Although women respond to men's humour because they have been programmed to, imitating it themselves can be difficult, and because we have a narrow mind on what is considered 'humourous', women's unique contributions to humour are often ignored and underappreciated.
    I have some questions for your claims:

    1. If society on a whole have been programmed to respond to a specific type of humor, why would women be an exception to that programming?

    2. If they wasn't an exception to that programming, wouldn't they agree with, practice and perform the very humor they was programmed for, and by that metric be equally as funny as men?

    3. If a lot of people disagree with the consensus of the programmed "male" humor, why wouldn't these people—being such a big part of the market—influence the direction of comedy, or even create their own market/content?

    4. If some women are funnier than other women (as well as men), wouldn't that imply that comedy is based on skill?

    5. If it's based on skills, why couldn't men theoretically be—on average—more skilled at this specific trait?

  3. #33

    So ... I'm not reading the whole thread, but someone point me to where we accomplished something more important and valuable than the usual back and forth between advocates of evolution (where women are sexually attracted to men and therefore men evolved ways to appear funny to women) and advocates of social construction theory (where someone usually complains about the fact that the patriarchy controls comedy and therefore women are underappreciated) ?

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  5. #34

    Quote Originally Posted by Arrogantly Grateful View Post
    So ... I'm not reading the whole thread, but someone point me to where we accomplished something more important and valuable than the usual back and forth between advocates of evolution (where women are sexually attracted to men and therefore men evolved ways to appear funny to women) and advocates of social construction theory (where someone usually complains about the fact that the patriarchy controls comedy and therefore women are underappreciated) ?
    If only I could.
    Jawz thanked this post.

  6. #35
  7. #36

    I've noticed a trend where female comedians tend to get a lot more shit than male comedians do. People may see them as low class or any variant there of even if they're saying the same brand of jokes men will. Using sex and the such. I'm not gonna say it's a patriarchy thing because I'd need to know where it stems from and I don't, but women are held to different standards as far as where they can go and what they can say without being looked down on in a very direct way. From a very early age, boys are more likely to push those boundaries and other boys will laugh with them. If a girl tries to joke in a similar way, her own female friends will probably not think too highly of her. Just a general trend. Being funny has a lot to do with pushing boundaries, making a joke out of things a lot of people may try not to, etc., breaking the wall of what is socially acceptable
    TallGreen thanked this post.

  8. #37

    So maybe it is true men use humor to aid them socially either with other men or with women, but in equal measures, it'd be against a woman socially or sexually to push those same boundaries

  9. #38

    I think it makes sense as a trait favored in evolution. In that case, it's certainly not an absolute for the humans that biological males be on average "funnier". With the ~mating world~ being less competitive now, and with little urgency to pass on a bloodline...neither sex needs to do x and y to guarantee a "mate". Dating is less about bloodlines & alliances and more about pleasure & fulfillment. So I imagine any evolutionary gaps in intelligence, humor, strength, etc. will continue to narrow over time given that relationships, marriage, starting a family, etc are no longer a necessity.
    As of now, I guess the consensus is that biological males are "funnier". As the Funniest Person Alive™, I must be an outlier ; )


    Something to consider is that the lines of what is/isn't funny have become very blurred. And subjective, conditional, whatever. It's hard to define what make someone funny. Is it wit? pushing boundaries? absurdism? You get me? Like... there are just too many ways a person can make you laugh, and that same person can be a total buzzkill in other aspects.
    Also, there are many types of humor: slapstick, situational, "wit", puns, existential, dark, satire, the list goes oooonnnnnnnn.
    What if a man is good at slapstick, but awful at the rest? Well, as someone who rarely laughs @ slapstick... I'd say they aren't funny. But would this study say they are? Some humor is universal, but it's hard for me to pinpoint why.
    Sygma thanked this post.


     
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