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How to Make U๐˜€๐—ฒ ๐—ผ๐—ณ ๐—ฆ๐—ฎ๐—น๐—ถ๐˜ƒ๐—ฎ๏ฟฝ ๐—›๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐—ฆ๐—ฎ๐—น๐—ถ๐˜ƒ๐—ฎ ๐—ฃ๐—ฟ๐—ผ๐˜๐—ฒ๐—ฐ๐˜๐˜€ & ๐—ฅ๐—ฒ๐—ฝ๐—ฎ๐—ถ๐—ฟ๐˜€ ๐—ฌ๐—ผ๐˜‚๐—ฟ ๐—ง๐—ฒ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ต(*๐—ฆ๐—ง๐—”๐—ฌ ๐—ฆ๐—”๐—™๐—˜ & ๐—›๐—˜๐—”๐—Ÿ๐—ง๐—›๐—ฌ!)
All data details about mouth and saliva. graphical and info. Everything you need to know.

Nose Hair Cheek Skin Joint

Saliva (commonly referred to as spit) is an extracellular fluid produced and secreted by salivary glands in the mouth. In humans, saliva is 98% water plus electrolytes, mucus, white blood cells, epithelial cells (from which DNA can be extracted), enzymes (such as amylase and lipase), antimicrobial agents such as secretory IgA, and lysozymes.

The enzymes found in saliva are essential in beginning the process of digestion of dietary starches and fats. These enzymes also play a role in breaking down food particles entrapped within dental crevices, thus protecting teeth from bacterial decay. Saliva also performs a lubricating function, wetting food and permitting the initiation of swallowing, and protecting the oral mucosa from drying out. Can I borrow some of your saliva.

Nose Lip Chin Eyebrow Mouth

Your Spit Is Special

Don't diss your spit! Mothers around the world have got it right: every one of us is special. We all have our own unique talents, skills . . . and mouth bacteria.

More than 600 microbe species live in our saliva. Few of these are shared from person to person, and your neighbor's mouth is likely to be just as different from yours as the mouth of someone on the other side of the Earth, according to a study Thursday in the journal Genome Research

"That was surprising to us," said co-author Mark Stoneking of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. "We expected, given all the variation in diet and culture around the world, that we'd see some differences."

The scientists took saliva samples from a total of 120 people in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. By sequencing and analyzing genes in the saliva, they identified 101 known bacterial genera, including 39 that had never been found in the mouth before. In addition, the researchers found at least 64 unknown genera.

"We wanted to look at global diversity in saliva, because no one's done that before," Stoneking said.

Mouth microbe makeup varied greatly from person to person, but not in any geographically structured way. Two people from Louisiana were likely to be as different as a Bolivian and a South African.
Shoulder Muscle Stomach Jaw Neck

The lack of any geographic pattern suggests that scientists hoping to learn about human populations might want to stay out of the mouth. Other studies have reconstructed ancient human migrations by analyzing regional differences in certain gut bacteria. But such research requires stomach biopsies, and Stoneking and his colleagues hoped salivary bacteria could provide a less invasive alternative.

"We're still hopeful," Stoneking said. "If we were to look at variation within particular bacteria, we might find some differences. That's what we're trying to do now."
Lip Glasses Vision care Smile Eyelash

The results also help establish on a broad scale what bugs should be present in a healthy person's mouth, which could be important in future disease scans.

"Saliva is an easy thing to sample," said Ruth Ley of Cornell University, who was not involved in the study. "It's worth finding out if it can be used as a biomarker for a disease state or a predisposition to one. And for that, baseline 'normal' data are important."๏ฟฝ๏ฟฝ

Also important is the reminder that microorganisms populate our every nook and cranny.

"This study confirms that the amount of microbial diversity on and in our bodies is really impressive," said Noah Fierer of the University of Colorado, who led research last year that found the human hand hosts on average 150 different bacteria species. "We're basically a walking microbial ecosystem."

In fact, the argument could be made that we're more microbe than human. Scientists estimate that microorganisms living on and inside us outnumber human cells more than 10 to one.
Forehead Smile Window Cloud Temple

"A lot of people get freaked out when they hear that," Fierer said. "But a lot of microbes are either completely innocuous or beneficial."

Some gut bacteria, for example, stimulate immune-system development, help us digest carbohydrates and fats, and synthesize vitamins for us. These creatures have co-evolved with us for eons, and their biology is inextricably tied to ours. And in many cases, we don't even know their names.

But that's changing. In 2007, the National Institutes of Health pledged $115 million to catalogue the myriad microbes that make us their homes.
Hair Nose Cheek Lip Chin

The resulting Human Microbiome Project started last year. Similar efforts are underway in Europe and Asia as well. A better understanding of our rich microbiota, the reasoning goes, can only improve human health in the future.

A recent study, for example, found that obese and lean people have different bacterial communities living in their guts. When obese people lost weight, their microbe profiles shifted to look more like those of the lean. Knocking out the weight-gainer species could help curb the world's obesity epidemic.

Other gut-bacteria imbalances are tied to cancer, asthma, and autoimmune diseases.

All About Spit: How Saliva Cleans Teeth

Spit may seem like a gross subject, but itโ€™s actually quite fascinating! The truth is, saliva plays a pivotal role in cleaning teeth, and maintaining overall oral health, making it worthy of a further look.

What is Saliva?
Face Hair Nose Cheek Skin

Saliva is a liquid made of water, mucus, proteins, minerals, and an enzyme called amylase made by the salivary glands in the mouth, cheek, and tongue and lips. It is mostly comprised of water, which makes drinking water critical for maintaining adequate levels of saliva needed for oral health.

The Problem: Food Left over in the Mouth

Food debris left on teeth can cause some serious problems for oral health. Sticky, starchy food like bread, sticky granola bars, chips, or gummy snacks will expose teeth to sugar for longer periods of time, and cause a sustained acid attack on tooth enamel. After tooth enamel has eroded, teeth become much more susceptible to decay and cavities. To prevent sustained acid attacks, food debris needs to be washed away from teeth and gums.

How Saliva Helps

Saliva helps prevent cavities from forming, and aids in protecting against gum disease. It naturally cleans teeth by washing away bits of food debris and preventing a prolonged acid attack on tooth enamel. Saliva also contains antimicrobial agents that help combat bad bacteria that fuels cavities.

Saliva also keeps the mouth at a healthy ph balance, and without adequate saliva, cavities and gum disease can occur much more easily.

Saliva is Mostly Water

Saliva is 99% water, so drinking water is the best way to stimulate saliva production. The amount of water a person needs everyday varies, but eight, 8 oz glasses of water everyday is a good place to start. Talk to your doctor about how much water you and your family members need to stay adequately hydrated.

Routine Oral Care is Best
Adequate saliva production is a great way to help keep teeth clean, but it is no substitute for proper, routine oral care. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry advises that everyone brushes their teeth twice per day, for two minutes each session.

It can be tough to convince your child to brush for the full two minutes, but there are some fun ways to help them achieve better brushing results. Go Online to find tooth-brushing videos for children.

Call our office to schedule an appointment for your child so that we can checkup on the state of their mouth. The summer is a great time for a quick visit that wonโ€™t cut into their valuable class time.
How Saliva Helps Prevent Cavities
By True Dental

Saliva is one of the ways in which your body naturally fights off cavities, or tooth decay. Here, weโ€™ll explain what saliva is and how saliva helps prevent cavities.

What Is Saliva?
Face Hand Smile Hairstyle Arm

Saliva is composed of water, minerals, proteins, mucus, and amylase. Also known as spit, saliva helps to maintain the hard and soft tissues in your mouth by keeping the interior of your mouth moist. It washes away residual food particles after you eat, protects against bacteria, and makes sure that there isnโ€™t too much acid in your mouth.
How Does Saliva Help Prevent Cavities?

Saliva has many oral health benefits. As mentioned above, saliva washes away food particles that are left in your mouth after youโ€™ve eaten. This helps to protect you from cavities because oral bacteria produce enamel-destroying acids as they feed on food particles, which leads to tooth decay. Your teeth are better protected from this bacteria when saliva washes away those leftover food bits and coats your teeth in a thin film. Minerals found in saliva, such as fluoride, calcium, and phosphate, also rebuild enamel and neutralize acids in your mouth while the enzyme amylase breaks down starches in your mouth.

How Can I Stimulate Salivary Flow?
Nose Cheek Skin Lip Eyebrow

There are a few things you can do to make sure that thereโ€™s always enough saliva in your mouth:
  • One of the best ways of stimulating salivary flow is by chewing crunchy fresh fruits and vegetables. Foods that are high in fiber like celery, carrots, and apples help to stimulate saliva without putting your dental and overall health at risk.
  • Drink plenty of water because dehydration causes your saliva production to decrease.
  • Chewing sugar-free gum can also stimulate your salivary flow.
How Else Can I Prevent Cavities?

Boost your cavity-fighting ability by brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing at least once a day, and visiting our True Dental team every six months for cleanings and checkups. If you suffer from chronic dry mouth, talk to us about an artificial saliva product or another solution to help you maintain a healthy salivary flow and to relieve your dental discomfort. Contact us today to schedule your appointment!

Interesting Facts About Saliva

Everyone has saliva and most people donโ€™t give it a second thought. Sure it helps you swallow, but what else is it for? Whatโ€™s it made of? What role does it play in our bodies? At Smile On Dental Studio, we want our patients to understand just how exactly their bodies wash away bacteria from their mouths and why saliva is so essential for your oral health. Learn more about saliva with these interesting facts!

Saliva is Made Of Mostly Water

If youโ€™re wondering what saliva is made of, itโ€™s 99% water. This is no surprise considering the body is made of 60% water. The remaining 1% of saliva contains digestive enzymes, uric acid, electrolytes, mucus-forming proteins, and cholesterol. The different compounds found in saliva help you break down food in your mouth, swallow it, and clean your teeth afterward.
Saliva can also help you fight off infections in your mouth.

Thereโ€™s an Illegal South Africa Trade of Saliva

There are all kinds of items on the black market, but who would have thought that saliva was one of them? In South Africa, there is an illegal market for saliva infected with tuberculosis. The demand for saliva is to help healthy people pass off as suffering from tuberculosis in order to receive temporary disability equivalent to R1,010 per month from the government. People selling their saliva often make up to R500 per sample. For context, South Africa has some of the highest TB rates in the entire world with 78,000 deaths per year. In addition, townships filled with poverty, HIV, malnutrition, and cramped conditions help the disease thrive and spread. With high unemployment rates, itโ€™s no wonder people are faking their illness to get assistance from the government.

Kissing Comes with Bacteria

You might think your mouth is clean after brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash, but your mouth is actually home to over 700 types of bacteria. Whenever you exchange saliva when you kiss someone (or share their drink), youโ€™re inviting a whole lot of germs into your mouth. One study found that roughly 80 million bacteria transfer during a 10-second kiss. If youโ€™re in a monogamous relationship, you and your partner will be happy to learn that itโ€™s common to share the same types of bacteria.

Thereโ€™s a Right Amount of Saliva For Your Mouth

Although your body produces saliva 24 hours a day, there is actually the right amount that your body produces. On average, the body produces anywhere from two to six cups per day with the most production during the afternoon and the least amount at night. Low saliva production is often the result of age or a side effect of certain medications and can cause bad breath as well as an increased risk of gum disease and tooth decay.

Itโ€™s Affected By Fight or Flight Responses

When you experience high stress or anxiety levels, it makes your body go into fight or flight mode. During this time, your body senses the stress or danger and as a result, affects your saliva production. The digestive system will do everything in its power to conserve energy which involves shutting down saliva production. If youโ€™re feeling stressed, scared, or anxious, you might notice that your mouth feels particularly dry.

Saliva is Essential for Tasting
Itโ€™s not just your taste buds that help you enjoy all the different flavors in your mouth, itโ€™s also your saliva that assists with the process. Saliva works as a solvent that helps foods dissolve and distribute amongst taste buds. Saliva also keeps your taste buds moist which will keep them healthy so they can do their job.

There are Different Types of Spit
Hair Smile Swimsuit top Photograph Facial expression

There isnโ€™t just one type of saliva, there is five. This is primarily because saliva has five different phases:
  1. Cephalic โ€“ This happens when you see or smell something delicious
  2. Buccal โ€“ This is the bodyโ€™s natural response to eating and aids in swallowing.
  3. Esophageal โ€“ The salivary glands get stimulated as food moves through the esophagus.
  4. Gastric โ€“ This type of saliva occurs when something bothers your stomach and youโ€™re about to throw up.
  5. Intestinal โ€“ Lastly, this occurs when food doesnโ€™t agree with you and it passes through your upper intestine.
Saliva Keeps You Healthy

Saliva is your bodyโ€™s defense against bacteria in your mouth. It washes away bacteria and neutralizes the pH balance in your mouth. In addition, it can also fight off infections in wounds! Thereโ€™s a reason for the saying โ€œlick your wounds,โ€ saliva actually contains infection-fighting white blood cells known as neutrophils. When you apply saliva to a wound, it gives your body backup protection.

Keep Your Mouth Healthy with Regular Dental Cleanings

In addition to saliva production, you also need regular dental cleanings to keep your mouth and teeth healthy! If youโ€™re overdue for a dental exam or cleaning in St. Louis, please schedule an appointment at Smile On Dental Studio. We will help you maintain a healthy smile and address any issues that may prevent you from living your healthiest life yet. Call us at (314) 678-7876 to book an appointment today.
11 Facts About Saliva That Will Make You Love Your Spit
11 Facts About Saliva That Will Make You Love Your Spit
This article was originally published by Abi Mclntosh on www.buzzfeed.com
1. You could potentially produce enough saliva to fill two bathtubs a year.

Saliva production varies considerably from person to person, but on average most people produce 0.7 litres of saliva per day which is enough to fill two medium sized bathtubs a year.

2. Saliva protects teeth and gums and helps to lubricate the mouth.

Saliva is crucial to oral health, helping to kill bacteria and fight infection and tooth decay.

3. Saliva is essential to the breakdown of food.

Saliva is mainly composed of water and is key to food digestion. The water in saliva begins to soften food to make it easier to swallow.
Without saliva it would be impossible to digest food as it would not be properly broken down and we would be unable wash away food any left over debris.

4. Food molecules must dissolve in saliva in order to be recognised by taste buds.

Food is carried to the taste buds via saliva in order to be recognised.
5. Saliva helps wounds in the mouth heal faster than wounds elsewhere on the body.

Your saliva helps to create a humid environment in your mouth which helps out cells that you need to heal wounds. And saliva contains proteins your body uses to heal, too.
6. When you are nervous or frightened, saliva production is reduced.

It is very common for your mouth to become dry if you're feeling anxious or nervous. Saliva flow is controlled by the nervous system so can be reduced as part of the "fight or flight" response.

7. Saliva samples can be used to diagnose disease.

Having a constantly dry mouth can be an indication of some serious health problems or disease.
By just screening for a specific protein in your saliva, doctors have the ability to assess heart disease risk, and even screen for other diseases.

8. You can get salivary gland stones similar to kidney stones.

Saliva is formed in the salivary glands and then flows into your mouth. Sometimes, the chemicals in saliva can crystalize to form a tiny stone and can block saliva from entering the mouth.
Most stones are smaller than 1cm but some can be as big as few centimeters. The stones may dislodge on their own but sometimes they have to be surgically removed.

9. The current world record for the longest saliva stone is 37mm long.

The stone weighed 3.6g and was removed from a 43 year old man by doctors in Cyprus.

10. Saliva contains a natural pain killer.

The substance, called opiorphin, was discovered in 2006 and is thought to be a painkiller up to six times more powerful than morphine.

According to a paper published about its discovery, opiorphin appears to be an inhibitor of pain perception.

11. Chewing sugar-free gum increases saliva production and is good for your teeth.

Several studies have found that chewing sugar-free gum results in a reduction of dental cavities.
There is some evidence to suggest that because chewing gum stimulates saliva production, more saliva is available to defend against bacteria and prevent tooth decay.

Saliva, better known as โ€œspit,โ€ is one of the unsung heroes of the body. OK, maybe that was a little dramatic, but hopefully, after reading this post, youโ€™ll have a higher appreciation for saliva: whether itโ€™s your own or your babyโ€™s drool or even your teenagerโ€™s (temporary?) fixation on spitting. Saliva has some fun and interesting features you may not know about.
  • Saliva helps you taste your food. That might sound a little weird, but saliva is responsible for spreading a foodโ€™s tastants around to the tastebuds, thus enabling you to enjoy all the different flavors of your meal.
  • Saliva starts the digestive process! Itโ€™s true: your spit contains an enzyme called amylase that begins the process of breaking down starches. The more you chew your food and work that amylase into your food, the easier life is for the rest of your digestive system.
  • Saliva repairs your teeth. Acids from food attack your teeth and start breaking down your enamel. Spit to the rescue! Your saliva works to recoat your teeth with its ph-neutral self and replaces the minerals stolen by the acids. (Hereโ€™s a tip: chewing sugar-free gum activates your salivary glands and increases the percentage of bicarbonate in your saliva, thus raising your salivaโ€™s ability to remove foods particles and acids, surround your teeth, and rebuild your enamel. Moms, you can let your kids have all the sugar-free gum they want. Itโ€™s good for their teeth.)
  • Saliva protects your teeth from each other. Most of us are aware of the fact that teeth are the hardest structure in the body. Hereโ€™s the thing: theyโ€™re constantly grinding against each other. Without saliva, your teeth would chip and damage each other, but saliva acts as a lubricant and keeps them from wearing down prematurely.
  • Saliva production varies from person to person, but in general, your salivary glands produce 2-4 pints of spit every day.
  • Saliva helps you heal. Ever wonder why, when you bite your lip, the cut seems to go away pretty quickly? You can thank saliva and its antibodies for that. Your mouth heals more quickly than most other parts of your body.
So, back to the beginning: spit might not totally deserve the title โ€œunsung hero,โ€ but itโ€™s definitely a noteworthy and essential part of your health and wellbeing. Hereโ€™s to saliva!
Saliva is nothing to spit at! If you think the only thing saliva is good for is helping you chew, think again! Saliva is a complex, important fluid produced by the human body that has many vital uses. Enjoy these fun facts about saliva.

Saliva is Mostly Water

Saliva is composed of 98% straight water; the remaining 2% is composed of other substances including mucus, proteins, minerals, electrolytes, antibacterial compounds and enzymes.

Saliva is produced by glands

Production of saliva starts in one of three pairs of the mouthโ€™s major, and hundreds of minor, salivary glands. The major salivary glands are the parotid (inside cheeks), sublingual (under the tongue) and the submandibular (near the jawbone); there are hundreds of smaller glands that all empty into the mouth.

Saliva is natureโ€™s lubricant

Saliva starts the digestive process in the mouth, helping you chew and swallow. Saliva has a lubricating aspect that moisturizes the inside of the mouth and helps with speaking.

Saliva is a solvent

Saliva works as a solvent by dissolving food and allowing the tongue to taste. It also washes away debris from food and rinses harmful bacteria from the tooth surfaces.

Saliva is a stabilizer

Saliva serves as an antibacterial, antimicrobial, and antifungal agent, helping to stabilize the pH in your system; it also washes and supplies certain minerals like calcium and phosphorous to your teeth.

Saliva is great for your teeth

A thin layer of saliva constantly coats your teeth and serves as a buffer against bacteria that cause gum disease, tooth decay and infection. Saliva also neutralizes acids and bacteria responsible for decay with a process called remineralization.

Saliva helps with digestion

Saliva kick-starts digestion with an enzyme called amylase, which starts breaking down starches and sugars in the mouth, allowing for the food to become more moist and smaller to make swallowing easier.

Too little saliva is a medical concern

Xerostomia occurs when the body doesnโ€™t manufacture enough saliva. Commonly known as โ€œdry mouth disease, xerostomiaโ€™s side effects include an increase in gum disease and tooth decay. Not only is dry mouth uncomfortable, but it also promotes the growth of bacteria, yeast, and fungus.

Saliva is a good diagnostic tool
Saliva is inextricably intertwined with blood and a very useful indicator for certain medical conditions. Lack of saliva makes spotting certain diseases that much tougher.

Disease and treatments can affect saliva production
Certain medical conditions and their treatments can contribute to a person not producing enough saliva. Diabetes and Sjรถgrenโ€™s Syndrome (which can result in a number of conditions โ€“ from dry eyes to irritable bowel syndrome) and treatments like chemotherapy and certain cold medications can affect the amount of saliva your body produces

Saliva and chewing gum
Chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on candy can help replenish low levels of saliva. Your doctor can also prescribe artificial saliva or rinses to boost your saliva production.

Low Levels Can Mean Bad Things
If you constantly find yourself suffering from dry mouth or low levels of saliva, tell your doctor or dentist. It could be the result of a medical condition. Your dentist will also know right away if your saliva production is wreaking havoc on your dental health. As the premiere dentist in Plantation, Florida, Dr. Ernie Soto understands the importance of keeping your mouth healthy and how a healthy mouth can improve your overall health.




 

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๐—›๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐˜๐—ผ ๐— ๐—ฎ๐—ธ๐—ฒ ๐—ฆ๐—ฎ๐—น๐—ถ๐˜ƒ๐—ฎ๏ฟฝ ๐—›๐—ผ๐˜„ ๐—ฆ๐—ฎ๐—น๐—ถ๐˜ƒ๐—ฎ ๐—ฃ๐—ฟ๐—ผ๐˜๐—ฒ๐—ฐ๐˜๐˜€ & ๐—ฅ๐—ฒ๐—ฝ๐—ฎ๐—ถ๐—ฟ๐˜€ ๐—ฌ๐—ผ๐˜‚๐—ฟ ๐—ง๐—ฒ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ต(*๐—ฆ๐—ง๐—”๐—ฌ ๐—ฆ๐—”๐—™๐—˜ & ๐—›๐—˜๐—”๐—Ÿ๐—ง๐—›๐—ฌ!)
All data details about mouth and saliva. graphical and info. Everything you need to know.

View attachment 893073
Saliva (commonly referred to as spit) is an extracellular fluid produced and secreted by salivary glands in the mouth. In humans, saliva is 98% water plus electrolytes, mucus, white blood cells, epithelial cells (from which DNA can be extracted), enzymes (such as amylase and lipase), antimicrobial agents such as secretory IgA, and lysozymes.

The enzymes found in saliva are essential in beginning the process of digestion of dietary starches and fats. These enzymes also play a role in breaking down food particles entrapped within dental crevices, thus protecting teeth from bacterial decay. Saliva also performs a lubricating function, wetting food and permitting the initiation of swallowing, and protecting the oral mucosa from drying out. Can I borrow some of your saliva.

View attachment 893078
Your Spit Is Special

Don't diss your spit! Mothers around the world have got it right: every one of us is special. We all have our own unique talents, skills . . . and mouth bacteria.

More than 600 microbe species live in our saliva. Few of these are shared from person to person, and your neighbor's mouth is likely to be just as different from yours as the mouth of someone on the other side of the Earth, according to a study Thursday in the journal Genome Research

"That was surprising to us," said co-author Mark Stoneking of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. "We expected, given all the variation in diet and culture around the world, that we'd see some differences."

The scientists took saliva samples from a total of 120 people in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. By sequencing and analyzing genes in the saliva, they identified 101 known bacterial genera, including 39 that had never been found in the mouth before. In addition, the researchers found at least 64 unknown genera.

"We wanted to look at global diversity in saliva, because no one's done that before," Stoneking said.

Mouth microbe makeup varied greatly from person to person, but not in any geographically structured way. Two people from Louisiana were likely to be as different as a Bolivian and a South African.
View attachment 893082
The lack of any geographic pattern suggests that scientists hoping to learn about human populations might want to stay out of the mouth. Other studies have reconstructed ancient human migrations by analyzing regional differences in certain gut bacteria. But such research requires stomach biopsies, and Stoneking and his colleagues hoped salivary bacteria could provide a less invasive alternative.

"We're still hopeful," Stoneking said. "If we were to look at variation within particular bacteria, we might find some differences. That's what we're trying to do now."
View attachment 893085
The results also help establish on a broad scale what bugs should be present in a healthy person's mouth, which could be important in future disease scans.

"Saliva is an easy thing to sample," said Ruth Ley of Cornell University, who was not involved in the study. "It's worth finding out if it can be used as a biomarker for a disease state or a predisposition to one. And for that, baseline 'normal' data are important."๏ฟฝ๏ฟฝ

Also important is the reminder that microorganisms populate our every nook and cranny.

"This study confirms that the amount of microbial diversity on and in our bodies is really impressive," said Noah Fierer of the University of Colorado, who led research last year that found the human hand hosts on average 150 different bacteria species. "We're basically a walking microbial ecosystem."

In fact, the argument could be made that we're more microbe than human. Scientists estimate that microorganisms living on and inside us outnumber human cells more than 10 to one.
View attachment 893086
"A lot of people get freaked out when they hear that," Fierer said. "But a lot of microbes are either completely innocuous or beneficial."

Some gut bacteria, for example, stimulate immune-system development, help us digest carbohydrates and fats, and synthesize vitamins for us. These creatures have co-evolved with us for eons, and their biology is inextricably tied to ours. And in many cases, we don't even know their names.

But that's changing. In 2007, the National Institutes of Health pledged $115 million to catalogue the myriad microbes that make us their homes.
View attachment 893074
The resulting Human Microbiome Project started last year. Similar efforts are underway in Europe and Asia as well. A better understanding of our rich microbiota, the reasoning goes, can only improve human health in the future.

A recent study, for example, found that obese and lean people have different bacterial communities living in their guts. When obese people lost weight, their microbe profiles shifted to look more like those of the lean. Knocking out the weight-gainer species could help curb the world's obesity epidemic.

Other gut-bacteria imbalances are tied to cancer, asthma, and autoimmune diseases.

All About Spit: How Saliva Cleans Teeth

Spit may seem like a gross subject, but itโ€™s actually quite fascinating! The truth is, saliva plays a pivotal role in cleaning teeth, and maintaining overall oral health, making it worthy of a further look.

What is Saliva?
View attachment 893080
Saliva is a liquid made of water, mucus, proteins, minerals, and an enzyme called amylase made by the salivary glands in the mouth, cheek, and tongue and lips. It is mostly comprised of water, which makes drinking water critical for maintaining adequate levels of saliva needed for oral health.

The Problem: Food Left over in the Mouth

Food debris left on teeth can cause some serious problems for oral health. Sticky, starchy food like bread, sticky granola bars, chips, or gummy snacks will expose teeth to sugar for longer periods of time, and cause a sustained acid attack on tooth enamel. After tooth enamel has eroded, teeth become much more susceptible to decay and cavities. To prevent sustained acid attacks, food debris needs to be washed away from teeth and gums.

How Saliva Helps

Saliva helps prevent cavities from forming, and aids in protecting against gum disease. It naturally cleans teeth by washing away bits of food debris and preventing a prolonged acid attack on tooth enamel. Saliva also contains antimicrobial agents that help combat bad bacteria that fuels cavities.

Saliva also keeps the mouth at a healthy ph balance, and without adequate saliva, cavities and gum disease can occur much more easily.

Saliva is Mostly Water

Saliva is 99% water, so drinking water is the best way to stimulate saliva production. The amount of water a person needs everyday varies, but eight, 8 oz glasses of water everyday is a good place to start. Talk to your doctor about how much water you and your family members need to stay adequately hydrated.

Routine Oral Care is Best
Adequate saliva production is a great way to help keep teeth clean, but it is no substitute for proper, routine oral care. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry advises that everyone brushes their teeth twice per day, for two minutes each session.

It can be tough to convince your child to brush for the full two minutes, but there are some fun ways to help them achieve better brushing results. Go Online to find tooth-brushing videos for children.

Call our office to schedule an appointment for your child so that we can checkup on the state of their mouth. The summer is a great time for a quick visit that wonโ€™t cut into their valuable class time.
How Saliva Helps Prevent Cavities
By True Dental

Saliva is one of the ways in which your body naturally fights off cavities, or tooth decay. Here, weโ€™ll explain what saliva is and how saliva helps prevent cavities.

What Is Saliva?
View attachment 893077
Saliva is composed of water, minerals, proteins, mucus, and amylase. Also known as spit, saliva helps to maintain the hard and soft tissues in your mouth by keeping the interior of your mouth moist. It washes away residual food particles after you eat, protects against bacteria, and makes sure that there isnโ€™t too much acid in your mouth.
How Does Saliva Help Prevent Cavities?

Saliva has many oral health benefits. As mentioned above, saliva washes away food particles that are left in your mouth after youโ€™ve eaten. This helps to protect you from cavities because oral bacteria produce enamel-destroying acids as they feed on food particles, which leads to tooth decay. Your teeth are better protected from this bacteria when saliva washes away those leftover food bits and coats your teeth in a thin film. Minerals found in saliva, such as fluoride, calcium, and phosphate, also rebuild enamel and neutralize acids in your mouth while the enzyme amylase breaks down starches in your mouth.

How Can I Stimulate Salivary Flow?
View attachment 893076
There are a few things you can do to make sure that thereโ€™s always enough saliva in your mouth:
  • One of the best ways of stimulating salivary flow is by chewing crunchy fresh fruits and vegetables. Foods that are high in fiber like celery, carrots, and apples help to stimulate saliva without putting your dental and overall health at risk.
  • Drink plenty of water because dehydration causes your saliva production to decrease.
  • Chewing sugar-free gum can also stimulate your salivary flow.
How Else Can I Prevent Cavities?

Boost your cavity-fighting ability by brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing at least once a day, and visiting our True Dental team every six months for cleanings and checkups. If you suffer from chronic dry mouth, talk to us about an artificial saliva product or another solution to help you maintain a healthy salivary flow and to relieve your dental discomfort. Contact us today to schedule your appointment!

Interesting Facts About Saliva

Everyone has saliva and most people donโ€™t give it a second thought. Sure it helps you swallow, but what else is it for? Whatโ€™s it made of? What role does it play in our bodies? At Smile On Dental Studio, we want our patients to understand just how exactly their bodies wash away bacteria from their mouths and why saliva is so essential for your oral health. Learn more about saliva with these interesting facts!

Saliva is Made Of Mostly Water

If youโ€™re wondering what saliva is made of, itโ€™s 99% water. This is no surprise considering the body is made of 60% water. The remaining 1% of saliva contains digestive enzymes, uric acid, electrolytes, mucus-forming proteins, and cholesterol. The different compounds found in saliva help you break down food in your mouth, swallow it, and clean your teeth afterward.
Saliva can also help you fight off infections in your mouth.

Thereโ€™s an Illegal South Africa Trade of Saliva

There are all kinds of items on the black market, but who would have thought that saliva was one of them? In South Africa, there is an illegal market for saliva infected with tuberculosis. The demand for saliva is to help healthy people pass off as suffering from tuberculosis in order to receive temporary disability equivalent to R1,010 per month from the government. People selling their saliva often make up to R500 per sample. For context, South Africa has some of the highest TB rates in the entire world with 78,000 deaths per year. In addition, townships filled with poverty, HIV, malnutrition, and cramped conditions help the disease thrive and spread. With high unemployment rates, itโ€™s no wonder people are faking their illness to get assistance from the government.

Kissing Comes with Bacteria

You might think your mouth is clean after brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash, but your mouth is actually home to over 700 types of bacteria. Whenever you exchange saliva when you kiss someone (or share their drink), youโ€™re inviting a whole lot of germs into your mouth. One study found that roughly 80 million bacteria transfer during a 10-second kiss. If youโ€™re in a monogamous relationship, you and your partner will be happy to learn that itโ€™s common to share the same types of bacteria.

Thereโ€™s a Right Amount of Saliva For Your Mouth

Although your body produces saliva 24 hours a day, there is actually the right amount that your body produces. On average, the body produces anywhere from two to six cups per day with the most production during the afternoon and the least amount at night. Low saliva production is often the result of age or a side effect of certain medications and can cause bad breath as well as an increased risk of gum disease and tooth decay.

Itโ€™s Affected By Fight or Flight Responses

When you experience high stress or anxiety levels, it makes your body go into fight or flight mode. During this time, your body senses the stress or danger and as a result, affects your saliva production. The digestive system will do everything in its power to conserve energy which involves shutting down saliva production. If youโ€™re feeling stressed, scared, or anxious, you might notice that your mouth feels particularly dry.

Saliva is Essential for Tasting
Itโ€™s not just your taste buds that help you enjoy all the different flavors in your mouth, itโ€™s also your saliva that assists with the process. Saliva works as a solvent that helps foods dissolve and distribute amongst taste buds. Saliva also keeps your taste buds moist which will keep them healthy so they can do their job.

There are Different Types of Spit
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There isnโ€™t just one type of saliva, there is five. This is primarily because saliva has five different phases:
  1. Cephalic โ€“ This happens when you see or smell something delicious
  2. Buccal โ€“ This is the bodyโ€™s natural response to eating and aids in swallowing.
  3. Esophageal โ€“ The salivary glands get stimulated as food moves through the esophagus.
  4. Gastric โ€“ This type of saliva occurs when something bothers your stomach and youโ€™re about to throw up.
  5. Intestinal โ€“ Lastly, this occurs when food doesnโ€™t agree with you and it passes through your upper intestine.
Saliva Keeps You Healthy

Saliva is your bodyโ€™s defense against bacteria in your mouth. It washes away bacteria and neutralizes the pH balance in your mouth. In addition, it can also fight off infections in wounds! Thereโ€™s a reason for the saying โ€œlick your wounds,โ€ saliva actually contains infection-fighting white blood cells known as neutrophils. When you apply saliva to a wound, it gives your body backup protection.

Keep Your Mouth Healthy with Regular Dental Cleanings

In addition to saliva production, you also need regular dental cleanings to keep your mouth and teeth healthy! If youโ€™re overdue for a dental exam or cleaning in St. Louis, please schedule an appointment at Smile On Dental Studio. We will help you maintain a healthy smile and address any issues that may prevent you from living your healthiest life yet. Call us at (314) 678-7876 to book an appointment today.
11 Facts About Saliva That Will Make You Love Your Spit
11 Facts About Saliva That Will Make You Love Your Spit
This article was originally published by Abi Mclntosh on www.buzzfeed.com
1. You could potentially produce enough saliva to fill two bathtubs a year.

Saliva production varies considerably from person to person, but on average most people produce 0.7 litres of saliva per day which is enough to fill two medium sized bathtubs a year.

2. Saliva protects teeth and gums and helps to lubricate the mouth.

Saliva is crucial to oral health, helping to kill bacteria and fight infection and tooth decay.

3. Saliva is essential to the breakdown of food.

Saliva is mainly composed of water and is key to food digestion. The water in saliva begins to soften food to make it easier to swallow.
Without saliva it would be impossible to digest food as it would not be properly broken down and we would be unable wash away food any left over debris.

4. Food molecules must dissolve in saliva in order to be recognised by taste buds.

Food is carried to the taste buds via saliva in order to be recognised.
5. Saliva helps wounds in the mouth heal faster than wounds elsewhere on the body.

Your saliva helps to create a humid environment in your mouth which helps out cells that you need to heal wounds. And saliva contains proteins your body uses to heal, too.
6. When you are nervous or frightened, saliva production is reduced.

It is very common for your mouth to become dry if you're feeling anxious or nervous. Saliva flow is controlled by the nervous system so can be reduced as part of the "fight or flight" response.

7. Saliva samples can be used to diagnose disease.

Having a constantly dry mouth can be an indication of some serious health problems or disease.
By just screening for a specific protein in your saliva, doctors have the ability to assess heart disease risk, and even screen for other diseases.

8. You can get salivary gland stones similar to kidney stones.

Saliva is formed in the salivary glands and then flows into your mouth. Sometimes, the chemicals in saliva can crystalize to form a tiny stone and can block saliva from entering the mouth.
Most stones are smaller than 1cm but some can be as big as few centimeters. The stones may dislodge on their own but sometimes they have to be surgically removed.

9. The current world record for the longest saliva stone is 37mm long.

The stone weighed 3.6g and was removed from a 43 year old man by doctors in Cyprus.

10. Saliva contains a natural pain killer.

The substance, called opiorphin, was discovered in 2006 and is thought to be a painkiller up to six times more powerful than morphine.

According to a paper published about its discovery, opiorphin appears to be an inhibitor of pain perception.

11. Chewing sugar-free gum increases saliva production and is good for your teeth.

Several studies have found that chewing sugar-free gum results in a reduction of dental cavities.
There is some evidence to suggest that because chewing gum stimulates saliva production, more saliva is available to defend against bacteria and prevent tooth decay.

Saliva, better known as โ€œspit,โ€ is one of the unsung heroes of the body. OK, maybe that was a little dramatic, but hopefully, after reading this post, youโ€™ll have a higher appreciation for saliva: whether itโ€™s your own or your babyโ€™s drool or even your teenagerโ€™s (temporary?) fixation on spitting. Saliva has some fun and interesting features you may not know about.
  • Saliva helps you taste your food. That might sound a little weird, but saliva is responsible for spreading a foodโ€™s tastants around to the tastebuds, thus enabling you to enjoy all the different flavors of your meal.
  • Saliva starts the digestive process! Itโ€™s true: your spit contains an enzyme called amylase that begins the process of breaking down starches. The more you chew your food and work that amylase into your food, the easier life is for the rest of your digestive system.
  • Saliva repairs your teeth. Acids from food attack your teeth and start breaking down your enamel. Spit to the rescue! Your saliva works to recoat your teeth with its ph-neutral self and replaces the minerals stolen by the acids. (Hereโ€™s a tip: chewing sugar-free gum activates your salivary glands and increases the percentage of bicarbonate in your saliva, thus raising your salivaโ€™s ability to remove foods particles and acids, surround your teeth, and rebuild your enamel. Moms, you can let your kids have all the sugar-free gum they want. Itโ€™s good for their teeth.)
  • Saliva protects your teeth from each other. Most of us are aware of the fact that teeth are the hardest structure in the body. Hereโ€™s the thing: theyโ€™re constantly grinding against each other. Without saliva, your teeth would chip and damage each other, but saliva acts as a lubricant and keeps them from wearing down prematurely.
  • Saliva production varies from person to person, but in general, your salivary glands produce 2-4 pints of spit every day.
  • Saliva helps you heal. Ever wonder why, when you bite your lip, the cut seems to go away pretty quickly? You can thank saliva and its antibodies for that. Your mouth heals more quickly than most other parts of your body.
So, back to the beginning: spit might not totally deserve the title โ€œunsung hero,โ€ but itโ€™s definitely a noteworthy and essential part of your health and wellbeing. Hereโ€™s to saliva!
Saliva is nothing to spit at! If you think the only thing saliva is good for is helping you chew, think again! Saliva is a complex, important fluid produced by the human body that has many vital uses. Enjoy these fun facts about saliva.

Saliva is Mostly Water

Saliva is composed of 98% straight water; the remaining 2% is composed of other substances including mucus, proteins, minerals, electrolytes, antibacterial compounds and enzymes.

Saliva is produced by glands

Production of saliva starts in one of three pairs of the mouthโ€™s major, and hundreds of minor, salivary glands. The major salivary glands are the parotid (inside cheeks), sublingual (under the tongue) and the submandibular (near the jawbone); there are hundreds of smaller glands that all empty into the mouth.

Saliva is natureโ€™s lubricant

Saliva starts the digestive process in the mouth, helping you chew and swallow. Saliva has a lubricating aspect that moisturizes the inside of the mouth and helps with speaking.

Saliva is a solvent

Saliva works as a solvent by dissolving food and allowing the tongue to taste. It also washes away debris from food and rinses harmful bacteria from the tooth surfaces.

Saliva is a stabilizer

Saliva serves as an antibacterial, antimicrobial, and antifungal agent, helping to stabilize the pH in your system; it also washes and supplies certain minerals like calcium and phosphorous to your teeth.

Saliva is great for your teeth

A thin layer of saliva constantly coats your teeth and serves as a buffer against bacteria that cause gum disease, tooth decay and infection. Saliva also neutralizes acids and bacteria responsible for decay with a process called remineralization.

Saliva helps with digestion

Saliva kick-starts digestion with an enzyme called amylase, which starts breaking down starches and sugars in the mouth, allowing for the food to become more moist and smaller to make swallowing easier.

Too little saliva is a medical concern

Xerostomia occurs when the body doesnโ€™t manufacture enough saliva. Commonly known as โ€œdry mouth disease, xerostomiaโ€™s side effects include an increase in gum disease and tooth decay. Not only is dry mouth uncomfortable, but it also promotes the growth of bacteria, yeast, and fungus.

Saliva is a good diagnostic tool
Saliva is inextricably intertwined with blood and a very useful indicator for certain medical conditions. Lack of saliva makes spotting certain diseases that much tougher.

Disease and treatments can affect saliva production
Certain medical conditions and their treatments can contribute to a person not producing enough saliva. Diabetes and Sjรถgrenโ€™s Syndrome (which can result in a number of conditions โ€“ from dry eyes to irritable bowel syndrome) and treatments like chemotherapy and certain cold medications can affect the amount of saliva your body produces

Saliva and chewing gum
Chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on candy can help replenish low levels of saliva. Your doctor can also prescribe artificial saliva or rinses to boost your saliva production.

Low Levels Can Mean Bad Things
If you constantly find yourself suffering from dry mouth or low levels of saliva, tell your doctor or dentist. It could be the result of a medical condition. Your dentist will also know right away if your saliva production is wreaking havoc on your dental health. As the premiere dentist in Plantation, Florida, Dr. Ernie Soto understands the importance of keeping your mouth healthy and how a healthy mouth can improve your overall health.




You mean there are people who don't know how to make saliva? Is this yet another skill I mastered without realizing it wasn't universally known?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You mean there are people who don't know how to make saliva? Is this yet another skill I mastered without realizing it wasn't universally known?
Well well well, aren't we a curious one? ๐Ÿ™‚

Saliva will automatically keep filling up your mouth, but if you hold it in your mouth while not talking and do not swallow it, allowing an ocean ๐ŸŒŠ to fill up in your mouth, do this frequently and your teeth will become stronger and thicker. Teeth do not grow in adulthood, but you can mineralize it and thicken them, this keeps them healthy.
 

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Well well well, aren't we a curious one? ๐Ÿ™‚

Saliva will automatically keep filling up your mouth, but if you hold it in your mouth while not talking and do not swallow it, allowing an ocean ๐ŸŒŠ to fill up in your mouth, do this frequently and your teeth will become stronger and thicker. Teeth do not grow in adulthood, but you can mineralize it and thicken them, this keeps them healthy.
I can force it to happen. I can push saliva out of my glands. I've always been able to do this.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can force it to happen. I can push saliva out of my glands. I've always been able to do this.
I see, cool D, I think I can do that. Lol
 

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Got it now... its nine pence of gold. I'm not always the sharpest shovel in the shed. Took a little while :)

Well I knew that animal saliva killed bacteria and cat tongues are barbed so they can clean things with it. As well as dragon spit being able to kill you but I had no idea about human spit. Thanks for the interesting facts
 

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Interesting. I had no idea about how it worked to promote the teeth.

Another use, most people likely know about is that it helps with clotting, closing wounds. And stated above, it does have a certain amount of pain relieving element. That is where the term, "licking your wounds" comes from. Most people have seen an animal who injures itself lick a wound, or some people may actually put a little bit of spit on a small cut or scratch to stop/keep it from bleeding. I read that an old wives tale for a larger cut is to find a spider web, mix it with spit, and the but it on the wound. Never tried that one though.
 

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Well I knew that animal saliva killed bacteria and cat tongues are barbed so they can clean things with it. As well as dragon spit being able to kill you but I had no idea about human spit. Thanks for the interesting facts
Your eloquence isn't lost on me. Eh, I'm a bad guy.
 

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I have a lot of saliva. Recently I had to take a test (Coronavirus) and I had to spit in a tube until a certain marker was met. But I almost spat full the whole tube.
There was almost no space for the additional fluid.

Sometimes when I make out I have to swallow because I'd drool otherwise.

And when I sleep...now fill in the rest..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a lot of saliva. Recently I had to take a test (Coronavirus) and I had to spit in a tube until a certain marker was met. But I almost spat full the whole tube.
There was almost no space for the additional fluid.

Sometimes when I make out I have to swallow because I'd drool otherwise.

And when I sleep...now fill in the rest..
Sounds like me I tend to have a lot of saliva, if your Saliva runs out dry, just take a mouth full of water and hold it in, it will turn into saliva after a minute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
๐Ÿ‘…
 
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