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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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NickWignall
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Caitlin Faas โ€ข Certified Life Coach

Thereโ€™s No Self-Improvement without Self-Compassion
self-improvement self-compassion Wignall

I used to get annoyed by terms like self-love and self-compassion.
They seemed like a shallow blend of new-age nonsense and useless self-indulgence.
But then a funny thing happened that completely changed my mind: I started writing about self-improvement.
The gaping hole at the heart of self-improvement
I started blogging in 2017. My goal was to take the best ideas and techniques that I used in my work as a psychologist and show how they could be useful beyond the therapy office for anyone who wanted to work on personal growth and development.
As I started writing about how to use psychology to improve our mental health and achieve our goals, I quickly found myself immersed in the world of self-improvement.
At first, it was exciting. Motivating articles about getting up super early to work on your passion; how you could throw off your deepest insecurities and take on the world; brilliant techniques to build new habits and break down bad ones. You know the stuff Iโ€™m talking about.
But pretty quickly, I started to sense that something was a little bit off inside the exciting wonderland of self-improvement. The whole change your life in 5 simple steps culture was starting to feel a littleโ€ฆ sleazy? The longer I read this stuff the more I felt like I was hanging out at a used car dealership or a multi-level marketing seminar.
The surface was shiny and exciting, but the core seemed hollow, if not rotten:
  • Lots of simplistic I did it and so can you stuff.
  • Plenty of motivational quotes from inspiring celebrities, but not much in terms of nuts-and-bolts technique.
  • An almost-complete avoidance of the obstacles and barriers that make real improvements difficult for people.
  • A pervasive absence of sensitivity to the contextual and environmental factors that influence improvement, wellbeing, and success (read: privilege).
  • But the most insidious part of all: The implication that youโ€™re not good enough the way you are.
The paradoxical problem with so many of the well-intentioned self-improvement articles out thereโ€”including some of my ownโ€”is that they end up invalidating the core ingredient required for genuine and lasting self-improvement: Self-compassion.
Whatโ€™s self-compassion got to do with self-improvement?
In my own work as a therapist, I see peopleโ€™s best intentions and plans for improvement fall victim to the same problem: They canโ€™t sustain their progress, in large part because they lack self-compassion.
Hereโ€™s an example:
A young client of mineโ€”weโ€™ll call him Samโ€”was a brilliant 3rd-year college student studying pre-med. At 20 years old, the kid had never gotten less than an A in his life and was on a full-ride to one of the most prestigious schools in the country.
On top of his intellectual prowess, he was also an incredibly diligent and hard-working student. Sam told me about his reputation for being the hardest-working kid in his school because he could always be found somewhere around campus studyingโ€”early mornings, nights, weekends, even holidays.
But there was a problemโ€ฆ crippling anxiety, procrastination, and emerging depression. What no one else saw about this young paragon of intellect and achievement was that he was burning out quickly.
All that extra studying and hard work actually had nothing to do with getting ahead and everything to do with staying afloat. He spent long hours in the library studying because he experienced so much anxiety and procrastination that it took him 3 times as long to do the work all his classmates were doing.
After only a few sessions it was clear to me why Sam, with all his gifts, talents, and motivation was in serious danger of really crashing: He was awful to himself.
Growing up in a cold, rigidly achievement-oriented family, Sam had internalized an intensely negative and judgmental way of talking to himself. He berated himself constantly in his own mind for being too weak, not working hard enough, and pretending to be more than he was.
And while this fear/shame-based drill-sergeant motivational strategy had worked to a point, it was destroying him now.
Sam had spent his whole life obsessively focused on self-improvement, especially academically. But now he was being crushed under the weight of his own aspirations because he had no core of self-confidence, self-compassion, or self-love to stand on. His narrow pursuit of academic success left him no time to discover his own interests, joys, passions, or values.
Sam is a perfect, if extreme, example of the central paradox of self-improvement:
Spend too much time focused on improvement and you lose the self. And without a solid sense of self, all steps toward improvement are bound to collapse eventually.
Because no matter how brilliant or talented you are, you will stumble, screw up, and fail at some point. And your capacity to bounce back and persevere has little to do with your technical skills and intellectual powers, and everything to do with your sense of self-worth.
To be resilient, you must cultivate self-compassion
Think about the best mentors youโ€™ve ever had in your life, anyone whoโ€™s helped you growโ€”could be parents, grandparents, teachers, coaches, counselors, even good friends.
What they all likely have in common in their approach to helping you grow and succeed is a balance of acceptance and challenge. In other words, theyโ€™re simultaneously supportive and accepting, but also challenging and stimulating. They meet you where you are and help push you to where you want to go.
If weโ€™re surrounded by people like this from a young age, we internalize that balance of self-acceptance and compassion along with achievement and challenge. This gives us the tools to strive and move forward toward our goals and dreams, as well as the resilience to pick ourselves up and bounce back after setbacks.
This becomes increasingly important as we get older and life gets more complicated and stressful and we learn more and more that setbacks are inevitable. We learn that talent and desire are not enough to achieve our goalsโ€”we need resilience and perseverance as well.
But many of us didnโ€™t have people in our early lives who gave us a template for how to be compassionate with ourselves. In fact, they probably taught us the opposite: that to achieve great things and stay motivated, you need to be tough on yourself. Which is why so many of us have such harsh inner self-talkโ€”we think we need it to stay motivated.
But what if thatโ€™s not true? What if you are able to stay motivated, productive, and achieve great things despite your harsh inner voice and self-view not because of it? What if your drill sergeant inner narrator is sabotaging your happiness and resilience to adversity without actually giving any benefit in exchange? What if the medicine is all side effect and no benefit?
The only sustainable path to achievement and happiness is to cultivate self-compassion
I had an old mentor and supervisor whose favorite line was:
Falling off the wagon isnโ€™t the problem; itโ€™s the rolling around in the mud that gets us.
In other words, setbacks are inevitable. But theyโ€™re not the problem. Itโ€™s how we respond to them that defines us and determines our future.
Unfortunately, many of us have been trained over the years to believe that we must be harsh with ourselves to stay motivated and achieve our goals and happiness in life. But this harsh, judgmental self-view is exactly the thing that causes us to fail:
  • Cheating on your diet with that bowl of ice-cream after dinner isnโ€™t the problem. Itโ€™s all the self-recrimination, guilt-tripping, and shit-talking you do to yourself after that leads to giving up on the diet.
  • Missing a workout one day because youโ€™re exhausted after work isnโ€™t the problem. Itโ€™s that you berate yourself for being weak and inconsistent that deflates you and saps you of motivation and energy to get back at it tomorrow.
Itโ€™s a truism in the self-improvement world that consistency is king. That the key to achieving your goals and finding success in any area mostly comes down to persevering, day-in and day-out, month after month, year after year.
And I think this is largely true. But the biggest obstacle to consistency is ourselves, in particular, how harsh and judgmental we are with ourselves after setbacks. We end up failing at our goals because we convince ourselves that weโ€™re failures any time we stumble.
Of course, 95% percent of diets fail! Of course, 92% of gym memberships go inactive after a month!
The good news is, thereโ€™s a relatively easy fix to this quandary we all find ourselves in:
Stop being an asshole to yourself.
Really, youโ€™ll be amazed at what youโ€™re capable of when you simply remove the burden of judgmentalness and self-criticism. You donโ€™t need to add anything. Youโ€™re good. Just stop telling yourself you arenโ€™t.
One of my favorite writers, James Clear, has a simple rule for himself for staying consistent and being successful in any area heโ€™s working at, from weight lifting to writing:
Never miss twice.
I love this because it implies that missing, and perhaps even frequently missing, is inevitable but not really a big deal. As long as you donโ€™t make too much of your misses, youโ€™ll end up winning in the long run.
All you need to know
I believe self-improvement is a noble pursuit. Whether itโ€™s losing weight, learning Mandarin, or starting a blog, the desire to be better and grow is a wonderful thing.
But genuine, lasting growth can only be built on a foundation of gentleness and compassion.
So, even if โ€œlove yourselfโ€ seems a bit much, simply try to be a little nicer to yourself, especially when youโ€™re pursuing something challenging and meaningful.
Remember:
  • Setbacks are inevitable and normal. Itโ€™s how we respond to them that matters.
  • Donโ€™t roll around in the mud. Remind yourself that wagons are bumpy beasts and hop back on.
  • Never miss twice. The best way to stay consistent with progress is to be gentle with yourself during setbacks.
  • Talk to yourself like youโ€™d talk to a friend. Push yourself to succeed, but be encouraging when you slip up.
Youโ€™re good. Sure youโ€™ve got baggage, weaknesses, things you regret and areas for improvement. But deep down, youโ€™re good.
Get in the habit of reminding yourself of that and youโ€™ll have learned the biggest self-improvement hack there is.

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32 Comments
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Linda Williamson
September 2, 2019 at 8:03 am
Love your writing. Sounds like conversation. Had to smile when you alluded to your upbringing. Keep at it.
You made me feel better about eating the half pint of coffee ice cream for dinner last night.
A good thing about old age is that I donโ€™t beat myself up about the little things now. Something to look forward to.
Reply
Nick Wignall
September 2, 2019 at 10:59 am
Thanks, Linda ๐Ÿ™‚ Really glad the writing comes across as conversational! Probably owe a lot of it to you!
Itโ€™s possible this whole article was just a way for me to rationalize my own ice-cream habits ๐Ÿ™‚
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Emma
September 2, 2019 at 9:49 am
Another article that I absolutely love. Great point on commenting the current self improvement articles out there. Resiliency matters way more than simple hard working.
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Nick Wignall
September 2, 2019 at 10:59 am
Thank you, Emma ๐Ÿ™‚
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Fred
September 2, 2019 at 10:51 am
Nick โ€“ another wonderful article that really hit home. Whenever I see a new article from you in my inbox, some dopamine kicks in with anticipation.
Iโ€™m so focused on studying self-improvement that I find my self past the Inverted U optimal point too often so this article was really useful to me.
Thanks as always
Fred
Reply
Nick Wignall
September 2, 2019 at 11:00 am
Thanks so much, Fred! Yeah, itโ€™s so easy to find ourselves a little too far on that side of the curve. Probably inevitable, which is why building the capacity to be aware if it is key!
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Jason
September 2, 2019 at 2:22 pm
Hi Nick โ€“ There is a lot here which really speaks to my journey as a person in his 50s trying to be a better me. Each of the four bold โ€œRememberโ€ points are now printed out and colourfully stuck above my desk to remind me that I need to be kinder to myself. Thanks again.
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Nick Wignall
September 2, 2019 at 2:32 pm
Thanks, Jason ๐Ÿ™‚ Glad it was helpful.
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Joe Van Wyk
September 2, 2019 at 3:11 pm
Hi Nick,
You have had a big impact on me in recent months. Your article on Behavioral Activation was a huge eye-opener. In fact, I am making that a principle in a curriculum I am creating called Healing Photography. https://www.joevanwyk.com/healingphotography
I may be reaching out to you at some point for some consulting help on social media, if that is something you are open to.
Blessings,
Joe
Reply
Nick Wignall
September 2, 2019 at 3:14 pm
Looks like a really cool project, Joe! I was a photographer in a former life, so combining mental health and photography is right up my alley. Hit me up whenever if I can help!
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A.J Buswell
September 2, 2019 at 10:45 pm
Hi Nick,
couldnโ€™t have come at a better time or on a better day for me.
? I asked myself where the clapping hands had gone!
Reply
Nick Wignall
September 3, 2019 at 8:14 am
Awesome!
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Mary Ann Koruth
September 4, 2019 at 9:18 am
Thank you Nick! This was beautifully written and so helpful.
Reply
Nick Wignall
September 4, 2019 at 9:58 am
Thank you, Mary!!
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Above all, avoid lies, all lies, especially the lie to yourself. Keep watch on your own lie and examine it every hour, every minute. And avoid contempt, both of others and of yourself: what seems bad to you in yourself is purified by the very fact that you have noticed it in yourself. And avoid fear, though fear is simply the consequence of every lie.

Dostoevsky - The Brothers Karamazov
 
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IMO, the good/bad people dichotomy needs to die. This way, people won't have to lie to themselves that they're doing good or are good people, when they're not. What they are is human, just like everyone else, capable of good and bad actions. Just accept it.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
IMO, the good/bad people dichotomy needs to die. This way, people won't have to lie to themselves that they're doing good or are good people, when they're not. What they are is human, just like everyone else, capable of good and bad actions. Just accept it.
I agree but I'm not sure why you are talking about this......is this related to the self-compassion topic or something? ....or are you implying that Self-Compassion entails convincing yourself that you are good?

Note: Self-Compassion does not entail deceiving yourself into believing that you are good. It's all about taking care of oneself.
 

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I agree but I'm not sure why you are talking about this......is this related to the self-compassion topic or something? ....or are you implying that Self-Compassion entails convincing yourself that you are good?
The bolded.

Note: Self-Compassion does not entail deceiving yourself into believing that you are good. It's all about taking care of oneself.
If that's what you want to believe...
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The bolded.

If that's what you want to believe...
If that's what you want to believe...

Okay, sweetheart

You don't seem to be clear about what you mean; you're not against me, but you're also not on my side........

It appears to be a little too abstract or, if not passive hostile, at least passive aggressive. Please be honest with me. Person.

You presumably want me to figure out what you're talking about๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚......lol

So here's another guess....

You're saying I'm neither good nor bad, correct?
.........
True,

Anyway, I'm fine, and if you treat me well, I'll treat you well, too, my third function Fi Introverted feeling says soo!
 

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"If that's what you want to believe "
Well Ok dear.....

You don't seem to be straight with what you mean, you are not opposing me, but you are not with me either........Seems a little too abstract or if not passive aggressive. Be straight with me. Person.

You probably want me to guess what you mean......lol

So I'll take another guess.....

You are implying that i am neither good or bad right?.........

True,

Anyway, I am good and I will treat you well if you treat me well, my third function Fi Introverted feeling sayZs soo!
Passive aggressiveness is more your thing than mine.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Like what
There's no need to provide evidence. If you're aware of it and still demanding proof, that's an issue. If you're unaware of it, then once again, if that's what you want to believe...

And with that, self-compassion is just a crutch. But then, so is beating yourself or other people up over nothing. I've always thought that people have mental ground hog days because it gives them a sense of control since with the repetition, they find places where they could have changed the outcome. Unfortunately, they get trapped in the cycle and end up doing more harm than good to themselves and potentially others.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There's no need to provide evidence. If you're aware of it and still demanding proof, that's an issue. If you're unaware of it, then once again, if that's what you want to believe...

And with that, self-compassion is just a crutch. But then, so is beating yourself or other people up over nothing. I've always thought that people have mental ground hog days because it gives them a sense of control since with the repetition, they find places where they could have changed the outcome. Unfortunately, they get trapped in the cycle and end up doing more harm than good to themselves.
no,

I'm not sure what I did unjustly.

You can't just assume I'm terrible because I'm bad; you have to prove it. Please show me!

I'm not actually sure what I'm doing unjust here, so please guide me if you truly care about my well-being.
 

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no,

I'm not sure what I did unjustly.

You can't just assume I'm terrible because I'm bad; you have to prove it. Please show me!

I'm not actually sure what I'm doing unjust here, so please guide me if you truly care about my well-being.
I don't have to do anything. Just know that people often project what they hate about themselves, onto others. This too is another crutch.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I don't have to do anything. Just know that people often project what they hate about themselves, onto others. This too is another crutch.
The gaslighting๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

Trying to manipulate me by psychological means into doubting my own sanity.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The projection...

And with that, I'm off to find the wizard, the wonderful wizard of oz.
Hahaha No.

I know what you're trying to do.
manipulate (someone) by psychological means into doubting their own sanity.
 

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Hahaha No.

I know what your trying to do.
manipulate (someone) by psychological means into doubting their own sanity.
No I'm not. I'm flat out telling you to analyze your thoughts, actions and conclusions since you asked me to straight with you. Much ado about nothing.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No I'm not. I'm flat out telling you to analyze your thoughts, actions and conclusions since you asked me to straight with you. Much ado about nothing.
Well I don't care I don't like your condescending attitude, you should tell me that in a more kind way, then I'll listen. Because I'm just like you xNTJ.

ENTJ Strengths

  • Genuinely interested in people's ideas and thoughts
  • Enthusiastic and energetic
  • Take their commitments very seriously
  • Fair-minded and interested in doing the Right Thing
  • Very good with money
  • Extremely direct and straightforward
  • Verbally fluent
  • Enhance and encourage knowledge and self-growth in all aspects of life
  • Able to leave relationships without looking back
  • Able to turn conflict situations into positive lessons
  • Able to take constructive criticism well
  • Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)
  • Usually have strong affections and sentimental streaks
  • Able to dole out discipline


ENTJ Weaknesses


  • Their enthusiasm for verbal debates can make them appear argumentative
  • Tendency to be challenging and confrontational
  • Tend to get involved in "win-lose" conversations
  • Tendency to have difficulty listening to others
  • Tendency to be critical of opinions and attitudes which don't match their own
  • Extremely high standards and expectations (both a strength and a weakness)
  • Not naturally in tune with people's feelings and reactions
  • May have difficulty expressing love and affection, sometimes seeming awkward or inappropriate
  • Can be overpowering and intimidating to others
  • Tendency to want to always be in charge, rather than sharing responsibilities
  • Can be very harsh and intolerant about messiness or inefficiency
  • Tendency to be controlling
  • May be slow to give praise or to realize another's need for praise
  • If unhappy or underdeveloped, they may be very impersonal, dictatorial, or abrasive
  • Tendency to make hasty decisions
  • Make explode with terrible tempers when under extreme stress
 

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Well I don't care I don't like your condescending attitude, you should tell me that in a more kind way, then I'll listen. Because I'm just like you xNTJ.
You and I are very different people, regardless of type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You and I are very different people, regardless of type.
I agree, we are somewhat different.

I disagree, Self Compassion is not a crotch but rather self compassion is a mental skill that can be used, I think converting your ego source of self-esteem to self-compassion/self acceptance is better and works more smoother. Self compassion can counter narcissism, This means treating yourself with kindness instead of comparing yourself to others, though comparing yourself to others can also be Se fun, You can stop narcissistically trying to evaluate yourself against others, which can lower your need for praise and recognition making you less needy.
 

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I agree, we are somewhat different.

I disagree, Self Compassion is not a crotch but rather self compassion is a mental skill that can be used, I think converting your ego source of self-esteem to self-compassion/self acceptance is better and works more smoother. Self compassion can counter narcissism, This means treating yourself with kindness instead of comparing yourself to others, though comparing yourself to others can also be fun, You can stop narcissistically trying to evaluate yourself against others, which can lower your need for praise and recognition making you less needy.
That's a weird twist to what I stated since not needing to fap yourself isn't narcissism. If anything, self-fapping/compassion is indicative of a narcissistic mindset since you need to baby yourself.
 

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INTJ8w9โญโญโญโญโญ๐ŸŒ€๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿงกโค๐—บ๐—ฒ๐˜๐—ฎ๐—ฐ๐—ตั•ฯƒฯ…โ„“๐”๐‘๐ƒ๐ˆ๐€๐๐’โ™กโšโ›“๐Ÿชแ’แ‘Œแ”•T แ—ชO YOแ‘Œแ–‡ แ—ทEแ”•T!
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That's a weird twist to what I stated since not needing to fap yourself isn't narcissism. If anything, self-fapping/compassion is indicative of a narcissistic mindset since you need to baby yourself.
Self Compassion is not masturbation. Lol๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚
 
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