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I read this article in a Norwegian newspaper about how kids are raised in the western cultures and how they often become egocentric and inconsiderate due to bad parenting (which has little to do with this post). There were listed 4 types of parents and I just thought people might find it interesting. I had to translate it though, so some of the terms might sound weird.

The empathy encourager:
This type tries to encourage the child to be empathetic and to see things from other's point of view. At the same time they often set strict boundaries for the child(ren).
"The empathy encourager" will often respond with anger when the child crosses the line. What's typical for this type is that they often feel guilty after they've calmed down, they will feel they overreacted and often apologize to the child afterwards, not because they reacted and said no, but because they got angry. This behavior will help develop empathy in the child.

As long as the child feels they get enough love, it doesn't matter as much if the parents make mistakes, it won't cause as much damage as it would otherwise.
"The empathy encourager" teaches the child to consider other's feelings. All parents make mistakes, and that's allowed, as long as you apologize to the child afterwards. It's important to show that you take the child's feelings seriously.

Curling parents:
Curling parents are the ones who will "sweep the floor clean" in front of their children, removing any type of obstacle or resistance the child might encounter.
Everything is served on a silver platter by these parents, and the children glide through their upbringing without any challenges.
Curling parents want their kids to be a part of as many activities as possible, and they will take on the role as 'taxi driver' for their kid(s). The parent's service is always top notch in these families, which leads to a tight schedule if they have several children.

Curling parents risk creating "service-children" - children who never have to meet any expectations or requirements, children who expect 24 hour service of their parents. Sometimes these children won't snap out of these unhealthy attitudes before they're in their 30s. These children will lack respect for grown ups and other children, due to never having boundaries or rules they have to follow.

Helicopter parents:
The helicopter parents circle above their kids, watching out for anyone or anything who can give their child trouble. Whenever the child does meet any type of resistance/trouble the helicopter parent will intervene.
This can be teachers who don't give the child good enough grades or a football coach who doesn't let the child play during a match.
This monitoring often continues in the child's adult life. It's becoming more and more common for parents to interfere in their son's/daughter's work-life, often contacting their boss to discuss how much they earn or similar things. This type of parent must learn to let go.

It's important that the children are allowed to make mistakes, to able to stand on their own feet later on in life. Especially 'helicopter mothers' have problems letting go of their adult sons.

Mirror parents:
Mirror parents are parents who listen to their child. They are empathetic and wants to get to know their kids!
This type of parent often intentionally ask questions that lets the child share their own opinions.
1. Explain, 2. How does that make you feel? 3. What do you think of this? 4. Do you want to know my opinion?
The result of this are children who feel appreciated and valued.

Parents should get to know their children, and encourage them to be open and honest like mirror parents do.
However, this type of parent can have problems with setting boundaries, much like curling parents.
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Thoughts? How do you think this relates with MBTI?
Obviously this is all made very simple, but maybe you have an idea of what type you are/would be?
Or even better, maybe you want to add a type or two! :)
 

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MOTM Feb 2011
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I think I am the Empathy encourager.

My parents were probably the same.
 

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... What?

What about the strict parents? The apathetic parents? The pussy parents?

I hope you''re not trying to say that there are only four parent types.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
... What?

What about the strict parents? The apathetic parents? The pussy parents?

I hope you''re not trying to say that there are only four parent types.
hehe no... :wink:
It's obvious that there would have to be a lot more. This is (still) just from an article I read.
 

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I'm a kick-ass parent
 
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Pretty much as a child they were never home that often and my amah (helper who lives at our home) would look after me quite a bit...
I moved overseas and lived with them normally where my parents would have to come pick me up from school and cook dinner and prepare lunch and we'd all help them out -- for about a year or so then I became a boarder and lived at school and they returned back overseas.
Now I've graduated they still live overseas and I hardly talk to them.

I am not sure if my mother is any of these really...
I think it is the distance and the fact that she "knows" I won't do anything stupid etc.
So she just lets me do my own thing and I only really have anything worth saying unless I need advice or help etc.
She trusts me and I know my limits...

She is in my opinion "The Prodding Parent"
Her parenting style is probably just suggesting the foundations of her values etc of life
and letting her children decide. If she disagrees with a decision, she will prod them in the right
direction BUT if the child is so set on doing something then you can't say she didn't try.
When they screw up or make mistakes they are the type to accept that the child made a mistake
and if it is such a problem that the child really needs help, then she will prod away and prop them up for a while
to give them support...
She is a prodder.
 
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