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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I went and got a master's in school counseling. The competition to land a school counseling job is fierce. Hundreds of applicants for one opening. Counselors not giving up their spot until they've retired and only so many schools. Fine. I started subbing. After 7 months I realized how lonely I felt. Everyone around me, but no way to form real connections when you're at a new school everyday. A friend told me about his non-profit that was hiring. This non-profits' efforts are conserving it's cities tree canopy. A lot goes into that. I said why not and was able to get a position working in the field. A opening for a higher position came around. I was interviewed and did not get it. Their reasoning - I did not have the same passion as the other candidates. They really wanted it. I agreed. Another position just opened up and four spots are available. I want this job. Why? Because I want to work with the boss and my friend who is applying. During the interview, the first question was asked "why do you want this job?" How does someone who feels so much - who is led by his feelings - who's decisions and actions are decided by his feelings - how he operates in this word by his feelings - how do you explain that this just feels right? I want to work with the two other people, because I'm attracted to their energy. It's emotionally healthy for me and with that I'm able to create harmony within the group, work hard, and enjoy the process. Unfortunately, this is not the answer they are looking for and I understand. My passion is not with the trees. But I enjoy working here because of the relationships I've formed and the good feelings with it. My intuition tells me I won't get the job because of my lack of a better 'why' answer - the inability to exude passion that isn't there - my passion is the people. My question is, does anyone else find themselves in a similar predicament?. Where your life is lead by your feelings and you go with what feels right - where has that gotten you? Giving them the answers they want to hear is something I just cannot do - to play the game and exclaim how my passion is for something that it's not. Where has your feelings taken you in concern with what you do for a living and is your moral compass aligned with the work? Are you happy working where you are? Another evaluation of my direction in life is in store and curious how you guys feel about the subject.
 

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My question is, does anyone else find themselves in a similar predicament?

Yes.

Where your life is lead by your feelings and you go with what feels right - where has that gotten you?

In the way you mean it, nowhere (I'll explain in a minute).

Giving them the answers they want to hear is something I just cannot do - to play the game and exclaim how my passion is for something that it's not.

Good man! [gives high-five]

Where has your feelings taken you in concern with what you do for a living

Basically, to hell in a handbasket.

and is your moral compass aligned with the work?

As you'll see shortly, I use a different moral compass at work than I use for the real me, so yes in a limited way, no in an overall way.

Are you happy working where you are?

I've figured out how to make lemonade out of the lemons.

OK, enough of my obscure answers. Getting to the point:

Though I'm "successful" at the activity I pride myself on (writing), and acknowledged by others as being so, the economic environment of my chosen subjects is such that depending on the income from writing about 'em would not yield what it takes to satisfy me. Consequently, I undertake my "pay-the-bills" job with a full understanding of what it's for: Not personal fulfillment in and of itself, but as a means to achieve personal fulfillment. I don't expect a hammer and nails to be what I want out of life; but the house they build will be what I want out of life.

And so let's look at the questions again:

Where your life is lead by your feelings and you go with what feels right - where has that gotten you?

If I had conceived of the job as the house, not the hammer and nails, I would have gotten nowhere, as dissatisfaction would have led me to keep changing jobs in an endless odyssey of seeking a job which, on the face of it, met my goals. Wouldn't have happened. Couldn't have happened.

But conceiving of the job as the hammer and nails, not the house, it has gotten me everywhere.

Where has your feelings taken you in concern with what you do for a living.

Having undertaken a job to pay the bills, at first I didn't make the separation in my mind/feelings between it and my real goals. I resented the job, and would toil away essentially at odds with what the job was all about. This served no one well. I finally conceived that in essence I was being paid to be an actor taking on a particular role, and that I should take professional acting pride in inhabiting that role...during the workday. I'm a splendid, if perhaps slightly eccentric, employee. I've set my creativity to making many solid improvements which have achieved a great deal of progress and which have served as an example. Whoopee. My pride in these doings is little. So, if my personal feelings were involved with this, yes, I would have gone to hell in a handbasket about all this. But the job has been the tool to help me achieve what I DO take pride in, and which could not have been achieved in any other way.

Are you happy working where you are?

I am happy thinking that I have served myself well, very well, and, almost inadvertently, served others well, very well.

And so, what's the upshot of this for you? If what you want to do with your life is ineluctably bound up with, on a primary level, what you do in a "9 to 5" job, then you must handle it one way; but do consider if perhaps what you really want to do with your life might be outside that, in which case you must handle it another way.

Sigh. :rolleyes: Sorry, that's all I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate the thoughtful response @odinthor . And yes, I will also compliment on your writing skills. I have found it nearly impossible to compartmentalize myself. I carry my stuff around, talk about it with others, gain perspective and go about my day. What do I want in life? I want to be with someone I love and have kids. That's it in a nutshell. And give love to those I love. Genuine, heartfelt and deep love. That's what I want. That's my passion. Family. What job will let me do that? I'll keep spreading the love and feelings, retreating at times and coming back out to play. I can feel I'm getting warmer. I'm getting close. We will all die eventually, let's not let this little thing take too much energy from me.
Not sure why you brought that out of me, but good vibes Odinthor.
 

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I appreciate the thoughtful response @odinthor . And yes, I will also compliment on your writing skills. I have found it nearly impossible to compartmentalize myself. I carry my stuff around, talk about it with others, gain perspective and go about my day. What do I want in life? I want to be with someone I love and have kids. That's it in a nutshell. And give love to those I love. Genuine, heartfelt and deep love. That's what I want. That's my passion. Family. What job will let me do that? I'll keep spreading the love and feelings, retreating at times and coming back out to play. I can feel I'm getting warmer. I'm getting close. We will all die eventually, let's not let this little thing take too much energy from me.
Not sure why you brought that out of me, but good vibes Odinthor.
Thanks, bro, that means a lot to me!
 

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I believe that in interview-language translates to "work culture" and "working environment"

So you could say something like.. "I mean we've talked about teamwork already with your previous question.. Well obviously one of the key conducives to teamwork are the relationships we are able to have with others, and consequently the working environment that fosters. As well as the *thoughtful expression as if thinking how best to phrase this* working culture that manifests out of that.. That really is what drives productivity in my opinion. Well.. I feel very strongly that there is evidence that there would be a strong element of this for me even as I'm going into this job, and consequently that I will perform to my optimum. That's really a key element for me, because if I'm aliging with my work environment, and it is bringing out the best in ME, then my performance will be able to peak, as well as the fact I'll be able to give back to my teammates in the best way possible."
...and then really sell it with passionate body language

I know.. you might have puked in your mouth reading that.. but in interview situations, that stuff works. Plus it's all true.
 

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Hm, my feelings are leading me nowhere so I try to shut them down (in vain). I've always been looking for the job that would just feel perfect, right in every way, but it doesn't exist, mostly because I have no vocation but only ephemeral fantaisies. For instance, one day I would dream about being an ethologist, on the next day I'd love to be an oceanographer, then an interior designer, perfumer or "nose", barista, animal carer... and the list goes on. And none of these are realistic goals (well except for barista and animal carer) because I have a masters degree in modern french literature (I wanted to teach literature, especially in college as a professor, but I changed my mind and don't want to do that anymore. I may love literature, I wouldn't love teaching, and I feel like this is a kind of career that requires a lot of passion and commitment).
I'd "like" to do everything everywhere, but also :

(I relate so much to this quote, I had to post it lol)

In fact, I think the problem is less Fi than Ne, which makes me want to learn everything but makes me fear being disappointed and trapped in an unsatisfying job. Keeping all the possibilities open is easier and more reassuring than actually committing in a specific field. So, the "perfect" job for me would actually be a "pay-the-bills" job that isn't too stressful and would allow me to have free time and energy for my hobbies.

I might have found what could suit me : librarian. I'd have free time, it's unlikely to be stressful, I'd love to learn all the technical aspects and data processing, I love books and libraries, and since everything can be found in books, this job could be my "all-in-one-dream-job". On top of that, librarians can organize exhibitions and meetings with writers (I've already contributed to one at uni and it was totally fascinating and rewarding.) I have to pass a competitive exam, which requires training, which costs money so I must find a part-time job for now, which is a whole other subject lol. Like you, I can't fake being passionate in something that I'm not. I hate retail and sales and it's almost the only stuff I can apply for (as a cashier, receptionnist, etc), my last job interview felt so wrong. When I was asked how were my previous jobs and what feedback I got, I could hardly smile and say "oh uh, it was... good. I didn't get much feedback..." (translate: my last job was hell, mostly because of a bitch (probably ESxJ) who micromanaged me, and a half-functional checkout).
Anyway, I have the motivation to become a librarian, so if requires (for now) to pass other embarassing job interviews leading to awful jobs, I'd take it anyway.

@Ghostcolors, you said "My intuition tells me I won't get the job because of my lack of a better 'why' answer". Well, you don't know yet, maybe you'll get this job anyway! I hope so. Because as Tridentus said, (even if it's put in other words), teamwork is very important both for your employers and for you. Being able to fit in a company and work well with colleagues is highlighted in every job offer. You used "feeler" words, but they probably heard the practical stuff behind, and how it would benefit them. If they absolutely want to hire someone passionate about TREES then... you'll find something else! Some employers are less formal than others and prefer human qualities to practical efficiency. And I think you can adapt to what the employers want to hear while still being true to yourself. Tridentus' answer is spot-on. Using words like these wouldn't make you fake, since it's just a translation of what you really feel.

"What do I want in life? I want to be with someone I love and have kids. That's it in a nutshell. And give love to those I love. Genuine, heartfelt and deep love. That's what I want. That's my passion. Family. What job will let me do that?" that's a beautiful passion you have there. I don't think it depends on the job but on your state of mind ; since what matters the most to you is the connections you can make with people, any workplace with nice people who you feel good with would be fulfilling. Or anything oriented towards care and service. It wouldn't replace a family of course but you'll have yours!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I believe that in interview-language translates to "work culture" and "working environment"

So you could say something like.. "I mean we've talked about teamwork already with your previous question.. Well obviously one of the key conducives to teamwork are the relationships we are able to have with others, and consequently the working environment that fosters. As well as the *thoughtful expression as if thinking how best to phrase this* working culture that manifests out of that.. That really is what drives productivity in my opinion. Well.. I feel very strongly that there is evidence that there would be a strong element of this for me even as I'm going into this job, and consequently that I will perform to my optimum. That's really a key element for me, because if I'm aliging with my work environment, and it is bringing out the best in ME, then my performance will be able to peak, as well as the fact I'll be able to give back to my teammates in the best way possible."
...and then really sell it with passionate body language

I know.. you might have puked in your mouth reading that.. but in interview situations, that stuff works. Plus it's all true.
Nah man, that was good. I sold it with my body language, that's for sure. But in the end, I might as well been a used car sales men. Not in the lying aspect, but all that good mojo gone to waste.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hm, my feelings are leading me nowhere so I try to shut them down (in vain). I've always been looking for the job that would just feel perfect, right in every way, but it doesn't exist, mostly because I have no vocation but only ephemeral fantaisies. For instance, one day I would dream about being an ethologist, on the next day I'd love to be an oceanographer, then an interior designer, perfumer or "nose", barista, animal carer... and the list goes on. And none of these are realistic goals (well except for barista and animal carer) because I have a masters degree in modern french literature (I wanted to teach literature, especially in college as a professor, but I changed my mind and don't want to do that anymore. I may love literature, I wouldn't love teaching, and I feel like this is a kind of career that requires a lot of passion and commitment).
I'd "like" to do everything everywhere, but also :

(I relate so much to this quote, I had to post it lol)

In fact, I think the problem is less Fi than Ne, which makes me want to learn everything but makes me fear being disappointed and trapped in an unsatisfying job. Keeping all the possibilities open is easier and more reassuring than actually committing in a specific field. So, the "perfect" job for me would actually be a "pay-the-bills" job that isn't too stressful and would allow me to have free time and energy for my hobbies.

I might have found what could suit me : librarian. I'd have free time, it's unlikely to be stressful, I'd love to learn all the technical aspects and data processing, I love books and libraries, and since everything can be found in books, this job could be my "all-in-one-dream-job". On top of that, librarians can organize exhibitions and meetings with writers (I've already contributed to one at uni and it was totally fascinating and rewarding.) I have to pass a competitive exam, which requires training, which costs money so I must find a part-time job for now, which is a whole other subject lol. Like you, I can't fake being passionate in something that I'm not. I hate retail and sales and it's almost the only stuff I can apply for (as a cashier, receptionnist, etc), my last job interview felt so wrong. When I was asked how were my previous jobs and what feedback I got, I could hardly smile and say "oh uh, it was... good. I didn't get much feedback..." (translate: my last job was hell, mostly because of a bitch (probably ESxJ) who micromanaged me, and a half-functional checkout).
Anyway, I have the motivation to become a librarian, so if requires (for now) to pass other embarassing job interviews leading to awful jobs, I'd take it anyway.

@Ghostcolors, you said "My intuition tells me I won't get the job because of my lack of a better 'why' answer". Well, you don't know yet, maybe you'll get this job anyway! I hope so. Because as Tridentus said, (even if it's put in other words), teamwork is very important both for your employers and for you. Being able to fit in a company and work well with colleagues is highlighted in every job offer. You used "feeler" words, but they probably heard the practical stuff behind, and how it would benefit them. If they absolutely want to hire someone passionate about TREES then... you'll find something else! Some employers are less formal than others and prefer human qualities to practical efficiency. And I think you can adapt to what the employers want to hear while still being true to yourself. Tridentus' answer is spot-on. Using words like these wouldn't make you fake, since it's just a translation of what you really feel.

"What do I want in life? I want to be with someone I love and have kids. That's it in a nutshell. And give love to those I love. Genuine, heartfelt and deep love. That's what I want. That's my passion. Family. What job will let me do that?" that's a beautiful passion you have there. I don't think it depends on the job but on your state of mind ; since what matters the most to you is the connections you can make with people, any workplace with nice people who you feel good with would be fulfilling. Or anything oriented towards care and service. It wouldn't replace a family of course but you'll have yours!
Beautifully said. As I read your post, I couldn't help but fantasize about being a librarian myself. I do the same Ne thing lol. I will know by this Friday. Thank you for the kind words.
 

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Pretty noble goals and aspirations @Ghostcolors I admire that a lot.

My question is, does anyone else find themselves in a similar predicament?
I can relate. Although when it comes to the interview stage I'm nowhere near as honest as you are. I've come to realise that I'm fairly good at advertising myself and in all actuality that ends up working against me in the end because eventually the ones giving me the money realise I'm not nearly as great as I may have implied I was. I never lie, in fact I'm always honest but there's a certain way to twist that honesty and make it look great with enough enthusiasm. It hurts though when you don't meet others expectations. Kind of knocks you right back down from cloud 9.

Where your life is lead by your feelings and you go with what feels right - where has that gotten you?
Yes, kind of. It did get me out of the country. It got me pretty far actually (not just physically)

Where has your feelings taken you in concern with what you do for a living and is your moral compass aligned with the work?
I don't do anything charitable, I'll be honest my job isn't necessarily 'noble' but I hope that it can be inspiring and uplifting. I'm an artist. If I can one day create art that speaks to someone, even just one person then I will feel accomplished.

Actually just the other day I got a job offer. One with 'lead' in the title, in London where I want to go back to and a significant wad of cash that I wouldn't have even dreamt of seeing. I started debating if the money and location would be enough to entice me but it felt like I'd be selling my soul. It'd be working on a project where there was no creativity, there was no illusion that they were creating art for anything other than squeezing money out of people and that felt like it went against my morality. So, yeah, I would say my moral compass influences my work.

Are you happy working where you are?
Yeah, mostly, but there are other outside influences which means that this job won't last.

Like @mangosloth was saying though I don't think we can ever find that 'perfect' role.
 

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Nah man, that was good. I sold it with my body language, that's for sure. But in the end, I might as well been a used car sales men. Not in the lying aspect, but all that good mojo gone to waste.
Well if you're hitting the right points, and you don't get the job- you can probably just make peace and acceptance that it wasn't meant to be. If I hit all the right points in an interview, and had all the ingredients to come into it with a strong resume- I would just conclude I didn't have what it took.

There has to be a line where you conclude "this is where my abilility lies"- otherwise you could put it down to circumstance and luck, and keep looking.

I dunno- every time I've felt like I've nailed an interview, I have. I've also failed plenty of interviews where I know I've not shown my best. That's all I have to say.
 

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Yes, kind of. It did get me out of the country. It got me pretty far actually (not just physically)
Interesting and mysterious :tongue: Are you talking about your feelings in relation to work or just your feelings in general ? If it's still about work, did one of your jobs give you the occasion to travel? Or to discover new philosophical territories? lol

I'm an artist. If I can one day create art that speaks to someone, even just one person then I will feel accomplished.
Artists are incredibly useful. (Okay, maybe there's a bit of self-congratulation in this statement because I would describe myself as an artist too (but amateur, not professional)). On a serious note, my favorite writers, painters and musicians have played a massive role in my intellectual maturity, and they make life even more enjoyable and worth living. I've read an article once that explained how reading developed empathy, which makes sense. Without art I'd be narrow-minded and unable to see things from many perspectives.
(Whenever I think I don't really contribute to society with what I produce (or, don't produce, precisely), I think about how I contribute to it as a consumer and as an activist, then I can actually imagine an impact lol. We're always "useful" in some way).

Are you a "professional" / "official" artist ? In which field ? It seems so difficult to earn a living out of one's own creations, especially for those who don't come from a prestigious art school (at least in France).


Actually just the other day I got a job offer. One with 'lead' in the title, in London where I want to go back to and a significant wad of cash that I wouldn't have even dreamt of seeing. I started debating if the money and location would be enough to entice me but it felt like I'd be selling my soul. It'd be working on a project where there was no creativity, there was no illusion that they were creating art for anything other than squeezing money out of people and that felt like it went against my morality. So, yeah, I would say my moral compass influences my work.
I feel you. Sometimes I think "hey you're quite skilled at writing, you could write a stupid love story that could perhaps make money (and it doesn't even seem to require skills, considering some best sellers that I won't name *cough* fifty shades *cough*), but, just, NO. Even anonymously, I couldn't do that lol. (And I actually don't think it's that easy to publish even the dumbest novels).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Pretty noble goals and aspirations @Ghostcolors I admire that a lot.



I can relate. Although when it comes to the interview stage I'm nowhere near as honest as you are. I've come to realise that I'm fairly good at advertising myself and in all actuality that ends up working against me in the end because eventually the ones giving me the money realise I'm not nearly as great as I may have implied I was. I never lie, in fact I'm always honest but there's a certain way to twist that honesty and make it look great with enough enthusiasm. It hurts though when you don't meet others expectations. Kind of knocks you right back down from cloud 9.



Yes, kind of. It did get me out of the country. It got me pretty far actually (not just physically)



I don't do anything charitable, I'll be honest my job isn't necessarily 'noble' but I hope that it can be inspiring and uplifting. I'm an artist. If I can one day create art that speaks to someone, even just one person then I will feel accomplished.

Actually just the other day I got a job offer. One with 'lead' in the title, in London where I want to go back to and a significant wad of cash that I wouldn't have even dreamt of seeing. I started debating if the money and location would be enough to entice me but it felt like I'd be selling my soul. It'd be working on a project where there was no creativity, there was no illusion that they were creating art for anything other than squeezing money out of people and that felt like it went against my morality. So, yeah, I would say my moral compass influences my work.



Yeah, mostly, but there are other outside influences which means that this job won't last.

Like @mangosloth was saying though I don't think we can ever find that 'perfect' role.
The idea of a wad of cash sounds so good right now. I could use that. I applaud you for not selling your soul though. You art people have a different perspective on everything. I was not gifted with anything artsy other than having a soul like groove when the right music starts playing (white boy dancing). But I think everything is going to be Ok. If the potential job I went for falls through, a 'Lead' position will be available to me with a very high chance I'll get it. Non-profit with lead in the title will look good on any resume. Show us some of your art sometime.
 

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Interesting and mysterious :tongue: Are you talking about your feelings in relation to work or just your feelings in general ? If it's still about work, did one of your jobs give you the occasion to travel? Or to discover new philosophical territories? lol
Not entirely mysterious. I'm not intentionally keeping that a secret (I mention it enough times before). And feelings in relation to work, life, relationship all dragged me out of my home. And, no I don't have a job where I can travel. That would be ideal (maybe?) but I mean literally moving to another country because of a job, life experience and to follow my partner. You could say I discovered new philosophical territories too.

Artists are incredibly useful. (Okay, maybe there's a bit of self-congratulation in this statement because I would describe myself as an artist too (but amateur, not professional)). On a serious note, my favorite writers, painters and musicians have played a massive role in my intellectual maturity, and they make life even more enjoyable and worth living. I've read an article once that explained how reading developed empathy, which makes sense. Without art I'd be narrow-minded and unable to see things from many perspectives.
(Whenever I think I don't really contribute to society with what I produce (or, don't produce, precisely), I think about how I contribute to it as a consumer and as an activist, then I can actually imagine an impact lol. We're always "useful" in some way).

Are you a "professional" / "official" artist ? In which field ? It seems so difficult to earn a living out of one's own creations, especially for those who don't come from a prestigious art school (at least in France).
I do make money as an artist, yes. I'm not a fine artists, I considered that route but I have enough family members who did so that I knew it's not an easy life. However because I'm not doing fine art, I miss it. I miss painting and drawing and such.

I work in the games industry. Plenty of money opportunities there. I can still apply all of my physical art skills into digital sculpting/painting/modelling.

I feel you. Sometimes I think "hey you're quite skilled at writing, you could write a stupid love story that could perhaps make money (and it doesn't even seem to require skills, considering some best sellers that I won't name *cough* fifty shades *cough*), but, just, NO. Even anonymously, I couldn't do that lol. (And I actually don't think it's that easy to publish even the dumbest novels).
I've always assumed that becoming an author who can make enough money to pay the bills is an incredible task but I also believe that when it comes to creative fields that people can sense the lack of passion and interest in your product. If you don't truly care about what you are doing then people will probably read that and lose interest themselves. Reminds me of a youtuber that I follow, mentioned that he started off with a gaming channel because "That's what makes money on youtube" but he had no care for it and got no views so then he decided to talk about what really mattered to him and suddenly he was making enough money to call it his profession.

So what you love is incredibly important for art.
 

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The idea of a wad of cash sounds so good right now. I could use that. I applaud you for not selling your soul though. You art people have a different perspective on everything. I was not gifted with anything artsy other than having a soul like groove when the right music starts playing (white boy dancing). But I think everything is going to be Ok. If the potential job I went for falls through, a 'Lead' position will be available to me with a very high chance I'll get it. Non-profit with lead in the title will look good on any resume. Show us some of your art sometime.
Well non-profit implies that it's all for a good cause right? That sounds important too. I don't do enough things like that.

And you keep at it with your white boy dancing. We need more white guys who aren't ashamed to move with the groove. ;)

I... should... I keep saying I will. I even did this Inktober thing for a bit thinking I'd show people my art but I've been happily keeping it to myself. I remember kids stealing my sketchbook being such a traumatic experience, even if they did respond with "You're pretty good at this".
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well non-profit implies that it's all for a good cause right? That sounds important too. I don't do enough things like that.

And you keep at it with your white boy dancing. We need more white guys who aren't ashamed to move with the groove. ;)

I... should... I keep saying I will. I even did this Inktober thing for a bit thinking I'd show people my art but I've been happily keeping it to myself. I remember kids stealing my sketchbook being such a traumatic experience, even if they did respond with "You're pretty good at this".
*a single tear* - fine, keep all that artwork to yourself :p but for real, when you're feeling it, a lil something plz
 

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1/2 the world is feelers, right? So all the reasons you gave could sound perfect and appealing to them.
Maybe you'll get the job. Fitting in with the team (unless the people interviewing you are stupid, young, cocky and inexperienced) is very important and a huge asset to any job.
OR Could you come out here and be a school counselor? They have had the toughest time filling those positions out here. we live on the beautiful Oregon coast. Our kids deserve a good counselor. If you have questions, send me a PM. Sounds like you're invested where you are, though.
 

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@Falling Foxes Ok! I asked because I'd love to travel thanks to a job. But since I haven't found a better one than librarian, I guess it's gonna be difficult, unless I decide to be a librarian in a foreign country. It'd do for the "abstract/philosophical travel" though.

I do make money as an artist, yes. I'm not a fine artists, I considered that route but I have enough family members who did so that I knew it's not an easy life.
Yeah I have no doubt it's difficult, it's definitely not a suitable job for those who need a stable life and regular income.


However because I'm not doing fine art, I miss it. I miss painting and drawing and such. I work in the games industry. Plenty of money opportunities there. I can still apply all of my physical art skills into digital sculpting/painting/modelling.
Nice, it sounds fulfilling too ! It still requires (different) skills and creativity anyway. Even if not perfect, would you consider your job a vocation ? I've always been afraid of turning a hobby/passion into a paying job because I feel like as soon as it would imply responsibilities and duties, I would lose interest and wouldn't have enough free time and motivation to do it (write/draw/whatever) "freely" besides work. I hope it's not your case and you can still find time for fine arts.


I've always assumed that becoming an author who can make enough money to pay the bills is an incredible task but I also believe that when it comes to creative fields that people can sense the lack of passion and interest in your product. If you don't truly care about what you are doing then people will probably read that and lose interest themselves.
Hmm I partly disagree here. I tend to think that in arts the result matters more than the process and that it's possible to fake passion, or, rather, create emotion that we don't feel just by following some "rules" and using peculiar techniques. I see texts as mechanisms supposed to provoke thoughts, ideas and emotions to the reader, which I think can be better executed when the writers shut down their own feelings and focus on how the text is gonna be received, interpretated.
It reminds me of Diderot's Paradox of the actor : what makes a good actor ? Is it being emotional and putting oneself in the state of mind of the character, or on the contrary, does it lie in being insensitive and acting while viewing onself from the outside, thus mimicking the facial traits or voice inflexions that best suit any given situation ? (we can almost see a Fi vs Fe divide here).

Anyway, of course I think it's better (for the creator) to be passionate about one's creation, but in the end it doesn't have a huge impact on the creation in itself. I mean, someone can put a lot of effort and passion into a creation that could still be a pile of garbage, while someone can write in a very detached and intellectual way an incredible piece of poetry.
And if the motivation doesn't come from the creation in itself, it might stem from the purpose of the creation ; I do believe that if someone is really motivated by making money, that person would become passionate by their means of making money and do their best to achieve their goal. Whether this creation is artistically good or not is another subject :bored:

That being said, yeah, writing a best-seller is probably not as easy as it may seem. It may require a few technical / writing skills, but also talent in business and in foreseeing what could be popular. not my thing at all anyway, morally speaking
 
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