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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So.

I've been overweight for about half of my adult life. (Middle aged now) It's insane how easy it is to get fat if you live in the West, especially the USA. (This is not a criticism of the United States itself. I'm just saying that a side effect of the prosperity we enjoy is that it's very easy to lose track of your health and fitness.)

The factors contributing are:
  • I have never been a particularly active person, with my interests mostly being in things like gaming, model building and creative writing.
  • My career change from a job that kept me on my feet all day to one that keeps me in a chair.
  • My success in my career, meaning I can afford to eat out a lot more than I ought to
  • My introverted nature, meaning I'm happy to sit at home and do my thing rather than get out.
  • I love Pepsi. I've cut back significantly, but that's only in the last couple of years.
To be clear, none of what I've written above is intended to shift blame anywhere but on my self. None of the factors above outright prevent me from having a healthier lifestyle. That's a good thing, because it also means I'm in the driver's seat.

Physically:
  • Mid 40s
  • Male
  • Blood sugar tends to be elevated but not Diabetic
  • Cholesterol good
  • 6' tall
  • Around 370 lbs
That means I'm still at a point in my life where I can turn it around before it kills me, but it also means that clock is ticking down fast. Next month I have an appointment with my doctor to get a physical, because I need to know how hard I can safely push myself to not only improve my health, but also to achieve a very ambitious goal. This will hopefully be my motivation to improve.

The goal?


The oldest person to ever summit Everest was 80. I have time, but only if I get on this NOW.

Even if I never quite achieve that goal, just getting on that path will bring immense benefits, so that's what I'm aiming for.

"So why are you telling us this?"

Because what I need is accountability. I have people in my life whom I love and who love me, but they're all too nice to push me the way I think I need to be pushed sometimes. My wife is really great but she's also an enabler, and if I asked her to bring me Pepsi by the gallon all day every day she'd do it even as I schedule appointments for kidney dialysis because of Type II Diabetes. So I love her, but she isn't much help here.

I also need tips. I don't mean advice. I mean tips. The difference? Everybody's different, and different diet/fitness plans work for different people. What worked fabulously for one person may catastrophically fail for another. So what I don't want is a bunch of "This is the foolproof diet plan that got me from 450 lbs to 210." What I'm asking for, is little tips and life hacks that people have discovered that I can gradually incorporate into my other activities for working toward this goal. Some may work, some may not, but my approach needs to be flexible and agile because I get bored easily and I need to work around that.

Climbing Everest is also insanely expensive so I'll need to save up for a few years. If I were fit enough to try it right now I still don't have the financial resources yet and that's fine. I'm opening up a savings account that I'll put money into when I can and in somewhere between 5-10 years I think I can do it. That's my time window. (I'm not asking anybody for help with money. Saving money is easier than losing weight, so getting in shape is where I need the help.)

The challenges:
  • Self discipline. I need to build that. If I had it already, I wouldn't need to lose weight now.
  • Food addiction. I am an emotional eater, and I tend to eat the most when I'm feeling discouraged or stressed. I also eat when I'm bored
  • I tend to like to eat things that are bad for me. (Unhealthy food is also cheap and specifically engineered to addict you. I have allowed myself to get hooked)
  • I am also an enabler, and when my wife tells me she's tired and doesn't feel like making dinner I encourage her to relax and just order something. That hurts us both.
So, fitness enthusiasts... Got any tips? Some drill-instructor-like motvation? Anybody else on a similar journey?

Anybody want in on this?
 

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I’m not a fitness guru. And I’m not some disciplined everyday fitness person.

But I was going to mention that from my experience anything I’ve ever quit, or tried to start… It’s not in assigning extreme rules. (I think setting limits is actually when people fail quicker).

I just think when we put things into an all or nothing concept, our brains are wired to desire more. That’s actually a reason why I’ve never quite understood why so many Alcoholics are told to just stop. From where I’ve sat I’ve seen all these alcoholics get out of treatment, say they are a new found person who seen a light, then wham after a few months they are slamming jugs of Vodka. (You see the same behavior with people and food as far as a diet & crashing). I think that people telling their brains it’s all or nothing, or this is the last one sets failure up.

Anyways I will jump to something I successfully for the most part curbed. Red Bull. At 30 years old I was drinking 2-5 a day (incredibly dangerous for heart). Loved me some crack in a can that taste like sweet tart. For me this wasn’t a weight concern (Red Bull gives you wings 🤣), but a heart concern.

Anyways I didn’t tell myself that I could not ever drink redbull again and go from 5 to zero. I told myself each day I’d drop one can. Then once I was to a can a day for a week, I told myself every other day. Then I told myself every two days. Then I told myself once every week. And that was the sweet spot for me. And because I never told myself I couldn’t ever have it again, I wasn’t binging it like it was the last time I’d consume or last day on earth. Instead I used it as my brains reward system for accomplishment. So I’d reserve it just for days like important meeting/celebration, or every Friday (yay made it thru the week 🤣).

And I’ve actually stuck to that. I started that at age 29 I believe. So it’s been almost 10 years. Have I ever slipped up yes. But again going back to how you tell your brain to accept your failures. I don’t beat myself up and just crash and binge a 12 pack just because I had two red bulls in one day or start all over. Because I don’t tell myself I failed. And I don’t tell myself it’s forbidden. I use the psychology I’m just going to see how far I’ll go. The funny thing is now I truly have curbed it enough that I’ll forget sometimes for several weeks I haven’t had one, usually until closer to my period (sugar 🤣), so I just drink it every random so often when my hormone levels are off. I not only don’t crave it much anymore. I actually sometimes don’t even have the taste for it when I do drink it.

Anyways ya know what I worked on next after I got the redbull thing figured out? It was soda consumption. I like cola too. Again didn’t tell myself I can’t have it. Started small and told self, only going to have one can a day. Then switched to no more purchasing for home. (I don’t purchase soda ever in my home for day to day living, unless one of my kids was having a slumber party). When I moved from one can a day to not purchasing for the home I had to supplement that caffeine my body was used to. In my case I chose either coffee or caffeinated water in the morning.

So when did I get my reward soda? Well anytime I went to a restaurant with family or thru fast food they serve soda (I did not order the largest one). Anyways soda is served everywhere constant. So I left it at that point to a social reward. (See how I told my mind I get to receive it). Again this was all gradual and accomplishment of one step moving to another step. Several years ago. Now I rarely even order soda as a beverage out. I prefer raspberry lemonade. At most it’s ordered in like a captain coke, but even there I usually order like a vodka cran if out with friends.

Remember I still have addictive behavior (almost all of us do). It’s important you supplement one addiction with a counter addiction but just try to make it a more positive spin. Back to that water or coffee supplement. I didn’t start drinking it heavy like to make up for 6 cans of soda. I just would drink at my most critical soda craving times. I’m talking about no calorie, carbonated flavor water that gives the body an illusion of soda (to start). Not that gross lacroix shit 🤣 you’ll fail then. That sugary crap. But again no more than 3 cans. Then tell yourself you get at least one soda a week or when out social.

I blabbed on and on more so to narrate the psychology and what you tell your mind and how to gradually achieve. Which matters a fuck of a lot more than simply telling you to go run a mile and tell yourself it’s crunch time (it doesn’t work like that for most people). Until you train your mind to train yourself slowly. And shed yourself of the all or nothing mentality. Which all of nothing when it comes to health and addiction in my view is a marketing gimmick. Look how many people crash then pay for more services and products. Because the mindset doesn’t work for most people.
 

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Take the same psychology I told you about decreasing in diet. Then apply in reverse with activity and exercise. You don’t tell yourself you’re going to run or walk everyday to start. You tell yourself that you’re going to go walk around a mall or a park and start with one lap maybe twice a week leisure. Then next week add 3 days. Then next week add more laps (not days yet). Stick to 3 days a week Park/mall adding more laps. Why because you’re not adding unrealistic goal too fast. You’re in a public leisure space that doesn’t intimidate (like a gym), you’re in a social and distracting place so you forget you’re exercising half the time. After you’ve managed to socially leaisire walk 3 times a week for a month then work yourself up to more.

Back to diet.
Again it’s not about quitting everything, it’s about reducing portions. And moderation.

What’s the number one thing besides soda that people get a shit ton of calories from in their diet? Condiments. I’m really fortunate I’m not a huge condiment person. So I can see the excess being consumed even clearer. If you use condiments a lot start by requesting easy and light on portions out and having just a thin layer at home. A table spoon is usually the serving size. Most people consume well over that just in ketchup or ranch. And that’s not even getting to the food consumption itself yet. That’s just a topping. No one should want to get 500 calories in condiments unless minimal it’s fruits and veggies. Which usually it’s not.

Next is bored eating: Differentiate between bored/emotional eating vs eating of necessity. Bored eating maybe have some pickles or jello on hand, jerky, low cal nuts. I’d start with that over trying to adjust your meals themselves (to me that is stuff you do way down the line after a few months of discipline, adjusting meals I mean).

Lastly increase water intake. Drink it when you’d usually crave those sodas.

So anyways I suggest all these things to start training your body and mind.

The soda steps
The social leisure walking steps
The reduce or eliminate condiments step
The adjust bored/emotional eating foods
Drink Water
And just eating only recommended serving size of portions for the meals.

If ya do all that stuff you’ll lose some initial weight and feel better for phase 2 later.

See I didn’t actually recommend you even go to a gym or even start with a heavy adjustment to diet initially. Because I don’t want ya to fail going extreme.

I am not a certified physical trainer. I have however worked within Health and fitness in wellness center and was an activity director etc. I actually professionally worked on measurable attainable realistic smart goals. I have helped diabetics reduce or get off insulin by just applying these steps that are only in phase 1.

If you’d like me to send you a blank template of how to write a goal for yourself to hold yourself accountable? It helps you measure success and design the plan realistic. I think you should try it. But I won’t be offended if ya say no. The reason is because emotional eating is often the contributing factor to weight gain. And by following a structured goal plan your not just outlining something realistic and getting inspired you’re working on your spirit too. Because the reality is self improvement even if physical isn’t just physical it’s with the mind.

Also with Mt. Everest… I think you should get a photo or painting for wherever your main sitting space is. And for your car dash have a clip. Your wallet by your card so you can see your larger picture goal often visually. My best friend did this with her weight loss when she had to lose 100 pounds to do gastric. She had a photo of a similar looking girl to herself much smaller. It was a realistic woman at a healthier version. She hung it in her bathroom mirror. I always thought this was incredibly smart of her to do.

I guess my point is don’t try to start at a leveled up perspective, you need to work on training your minds psychology first, and discipline of basics. Can’t jump in like an already disciplined avid fitness guru. Gotta work your way up. I even have to do this too anytime I fall off the wagon and get lazier or eat shittier. I don’t jump to where I was at my fittest. I work my way back up slowly.
 

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Some may work, some may not, but my approach needs to be flexible and agile because I get bored easily and I need to work around that.
If you're serious, you ought to get rid of the mentality behind the above quote; because as it reads, it's basically just a way for you to quit mid through anything that becomes too tough for you to adhere to. It's one thing to shop around so to speak in order to find what works for you, but once you decide, you need to actually stick with it for however long the predetermined amount of time according to the routine/diet, otherwise you'll never really see the results you're after.

The first thing I'd recommend is to download Cronometer and make an account online. The free version should be good enough to get you started and help you keep track of your macros and nutrients. They also have an option within the app to track a keto diet which, the second thing I'd recommend if you're looking to lose weight is to look into a ketogenic diet.

I was looking for a quote, something about how bodybuilding isn't an overnight thing and it's a life journey or something, but couldn't seem to find what I was vaguely remembering. Instead I came across this one which I thought was sorta apt:

The real workout starts when you want to stop. – Ronnie Coleman, 8-time Mr Olympia.

When I looked online just now, it seemed like a lot of answers regarding the meaning of it have to do with "real muscle gains, and how they happen on the last few reps" etc... but personally, I understood it to be more about how you are often your own worst enemy when it comes to trying to accomplish things... in general. The mind always plays a huge role, and so I guess along those lines, so does your 'will'.
 

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Eat lots of fiber and protein because they are filling. Eat tons of veggies. You might not even have to consciously eat less at the start if you cut out unnecessary calories like liquid calories, creamy/sugary sauces, and oils (skip fried foods and bake/boil them).

You don't even need to count calories; at 370 lbs weight will fall off of you with just walking and cutting out the soda. You can of course switch to diet soda but I'd just cut out the soda altogether; you'll probably eventually lose the taste for it, and you may as well start sooner rather than later.

Even after you get leaner, you can just stop eating a few bites early or go to bed a bit hungry. That's if you don't really want to count calories. You can instead start looking at labels and getting a rough idea of how many calories you are eating.

Don't keep junk food in the house and don't grocery shop while you're hungry. If you ever want a treat, walk to the store for it, and try to get something halfway healthy and filling like a protein bar. Treat your sweet tooth with fruit instead of processed sugar.

Make a habit of walking instead of driving for things that are within a couple of miles of home, park a ways away from your destinations and walk the rest of the way, get off public transportation a stop or two early and walk. Listen to audiobooks, mp3 player, etc. if you find walking boring.

Find exercise you like and make it a habit; don't rely on willpower (except to form the habit).

If you hate exercise, start with very short workouts (like 5 minutes). It will become easier and start to feel good once you start to get in shape. Don't do too much cardio (like more than an hour or two at a time) because it tends to make people hungry (you can try it out at some point and see if you're the same).

Lift weights and continually increase the amount you lift. Buying a pair of dumbbells, kettlebells, or a barbell will be cheaper than a gym membership in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks very much for taking the time to write out these very detailed posts, guys. I'm feelin' the love. :)

Some specific thoughts:

...
I blabbed on and on more so to narrate the psychology and what you tell your mind and how to gradually achieve. Which matters a fuck of a lot more than simply telling you to go run a mile and tell yourself it’s crunch time (it doesn’t work like that for most people). Until you train your mind to train yourself slowly. And shed yourself of the all or nothing mentality. Which all of nothing when it comes to health and addiction in my view is a marketing gimmick. Look how many people crash then pay for more services and products. Because the mindset doesn’t work for most people.
I've been doing something like this, but it tends to be something like a sine wave that I am gradually flattening. I used to do 2 - 3 20oz Pepsis a day. Got it down to one 12oz can a day, then it came back up, and I'm slowing it back down.

If you’d like me to send you a blank template of how to write a goal for yourself to hold yourself accountable? It helps you measure success and design the plan realistic. I think you should try it....

Also with Mt. Everest… I think you should get a photo or painting for wherever your main sitting space is.
That would be great, thanks!

And I had a notion to do something like that. I want to by a climbing axe and engrave on the handle something like "How bad do you want it?" and hang it on the wall in front of my desk.

If you're serious, you ought to get rid of the mentality behind the above quote; because as it reads, it's basically just a way for you to quit mid through anything that becomes too tough for you to adhere to. It's one thing to shop around so to speak in order to find what works for you, but once you decide, you need to actually stick with it for however long the predetermined amount of time according to the routine/diet, otherwise you'll never really see the results you're after.
That is something I struggle with, and I know I need to adjust that mindset.

You don't even need to count calories; at 370 lbs weight will fall off of you with just walking and cutting out the soda. You can of course switch to diet soda but I'd just cut out the soda altogether; you'll probably eventually lose the taste for it, and you may as well start sooner rather than later.
My doctor said something like this too. And I don't disagree at all.

I cut out most of the posts not because I didn't read and value it, but for brevity in this reply. I read every single word and am taking them to heart.

I've recently had a bout with COVID and one of the lingering effects is fatigue. That's no lie. This morning I got outside for the first time in a couple of weeks to load up my truck with the remains of a carport/awning that collapsed in the recent snow. It wasn't hard work... only 60lbs or so of thin tube steel in about 20 pieces... but by the time I took it to the dump/recycling center, unloaded it and got home, I was completely wiped out. This is going to be a real problem until it goes away. Maybe I can accelerate the process by forcing myself to be more active in the meantime.
 

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I lost 85 pounds starting about 10 years back (in my mid-fifties), and I've kept them off. Here's how I did it:

Buy a couple diet books, and read 1-5 pages each day over breakfast or lunch or while working out, or whatever. Just read 1-5 pages per day, and in a couple years you'll have read thousands of pages of material written by the best experts in the world. You'll become an expert yourself, and you won't be in the position of needing to ask for diet tips from strangers on the internet. :)

Pretty quickly, you'll learn the difference between carbs and starches, between polyunsaturated fats and saturated fats, between whole grains and processed grains, etc. And as you learn, you can start switching out good foods to replace the bad ones in your current diet.

Also, 1-5 pages a day is an excellent way to keep your goal right there in front of you. The reading may be boring, but just do a page or two a day and it will be a daily reminder to stay focused on eating right.

And in between diet books, read an occasional book on working out. Learn the difference between cardio training and weight training. Learn how long to let muscles rest between sets, how to push without straining, etc.

First book recommendation: The Mediterranean Prescription by Angelo Acquista. It kicked off the whole "Mediterranean Diet" movement. It's an oldie (pub. 2006), but to this day the Mediterranean Diet is considered the single most successful diet that allows you to eat normal foods. Check WebMD for more on the subject.*

For something more up to date, a lot of new research has been coming out on the benefits of antioxidants, other super-healthy foods, and so on. For the latest and best info on all that: Eat to Beat Disease by William W. Li. Li is a very mainstream researcher with excellent mainstream credentials. He isn't some new-age spiritual guy. He's rock-solid mainstream science. Check his background in Wikipedia.

In short: Go to the experts and learn from them. And turn yourself into an expert in turn.

* Quote from WebMD:
"Research continues to show the Mediterranean Diet, based on healthy foods and physical activity, is the best prescription for a long, healthy life. It is an excellent, enjoyable diet plan that is easy to follow, and flexible. Even if you don’t follow the diet faithfully, simply eating more of the foods on the plan, dining more leisurely, and being more active are superb health goals."
Link: Mediterranean Diet Review: Foods & Weight Loss Effectiveness
 

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There’s already some amazing advice in this thread, so I won’t have much to say.

First off, I agree that complete abstinence is a worse option than simply cutting down on things. Making things forbidden is a surefire way to make them more tempting.

At least for me, exercising is SO much easier than eating healthy. I do my run and core/weights in the morning, then do a walk at noon, and another walk at 3 pm. Of course, both exercise and control over diet are important, but it’s also sensible to lean into what works best for you. I’m 5’9” and 170 lb.; I want to get back down to 145-150 lb. I know my diet is the main remaining factor. BUT, burning calories regularly is very important. That way you don’t have to restrict yourself AS much. At least for me I know I couldn’t lose weight just by trying to eat less. I don’t have that much self-control haha.

And I’m sure it goes without saying, but cut slowly. One of my coworkers says he’s gonna start a 500-calorie per day diet and I’m no expert but that sounds like a great way to die.

Also, if you’re gonna climb Everest, I’d take a look at Alan Arnette’s blog. It’s my favorite place to learn more about the mountain and its climbers. Everest is definitely not on my bucket list but it’s very interesting to read about. It is strongly recommended to summit many other peaks and have other mountaineering experience before Everest. I think setting goals for smaller summits then working your way up to Everest will help keep you accountable and progressing. Of course, that’s for the future. Once you’ve gotten to the point where you can hike 20 miles or so, Mt. Whitney in California is a great peak to try — if you go in the summer, it’s just a straight hike with some cables. Not bad at all, no ice experience needed, but it’s an amazing accomplishment. Then you could start building up to Rainier, Kilimanjaro, etc. As a disclaimer, I’ve only done Whitney, and it’s just an really intense day hike. The rest of the info is what I’ve gathered from reading and the experiences of family members.

Above all — You can do this. I believe in you.
 

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Can't say anything on exercising because I'm struggling with that too 😂 For food stuff:

1) West side of the world tends to have bigger portions as the norm. You can't do much about this when eating out, but at home you can get a smaller plate/bowl and use that instead. You get the satisfaction of seeing a filled dish, but it actually contains less food.

2) When eating, eat as slowly as possible. This is the biggest thing that's helped my mom with losing weight. It takes time for the digestive process to happen and send signals to your brain that you're full. By eating slowly you give more time for that signal to reach your brain and give you a more accurate sense of that point when you're full but not over-full, which is when you should stop eating. Whereas if you eat fast you consume more food than you need before your brain gets that signal. So now my mom doesn't need as much food for her to be satisfied. For me, watching something while I eat helps me to eat slower, whereas for some people doing that makes them shove food into their mouths without realising, so that's something to be aware of too.

3) For emotional eating, it's hard to control that, but you can control what you have available in your house when the urges hit. Get rid of all the unhealthy snacks and drinks, and have only healthier alternatives available. Most of the time you'll find that you'd rather take a "sub-par" option to fill the need to snack, rather than go out of your way to get the food you're actually craving. If you do decide that you want pepsi or another unhealthy snack badly enough to actually leave the house to get it, don't buy the big packs. Allow yourself to only get the number of cans or packets that you can finish in one sitting. That way, if you want more you're going to have to go through the effort of going out to get it again. You can also play little games with yourself, for example if you want to cheat a little and buy more than you should, you get to do that as a reward if you run the whole way to the store etc.

4) I used to really like soft drinks and fast food, just cause I was raised on a lot of that LOL. With soft drinks, there was a time when I decided to force myself to not drink that, or anything else except water for about 2 weeks, even though I hate the taste of water. The body craves water naturally, so those weeks really helped reset my body and it just became normal for me to drink water on a regular basis. After that soft drinks no longer seemed as appealing to me, although I still crave it a few times a month. And that's fine. Life doesn't have to be about completely cutting things out, it's moderation that's important.. I also did the same thing with fast food and the result was the same as well, I don't crave it as often as I used to. This isn't gonna work for everyone, but it's something you could try that might help more than you think.
 

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So.

I've been overweight for about half of my adult life. (Middle aged now) It's insane how easy it is to get fat if you live in the West, especially the USA. (This is not a criticism of the United States itself. I'm just saying that a side effect of the prosperity we enjoy is that it's very easy to lose track of your health and fitness.)

The factors contributing are:
  • I have never been a particularly active person, with my interests mostly being in things like gaming, model building and creative writing.
  • My career change from a job that kept me on my feet all day to one that keeps me in a chair.
  • My success in my career, meaning I can afford to eat out a lot more than I ought to
  • My introverted nature, meaning I'm happy to sit at home and do my thing rather than get out.
  • I love Pepsi. I've cut back significantly, but that's only in the last couple of years.
To be clear, none of what I've written above is intended to shift blame anywhere but on my self. None of the factors above outright prevent me from having a healthier lifestyle. That's a good thing, because it also means I'm in the driver's seat.

Physically:
  • Mid 40s
  • Male
  • Blood sugar tends to be elevated but not Diabetic
  • Cholesterol good
  • 6' tall
  • Around 370 lbs
That means I'm still at a point in my life where I can turn it around before it kills me, but it also means that clock is ticking down fast. Next month I have an appointment with my doctor to get a physical, because I need to know how hard I can safely push myself to not only improve my health, but also to achieve a very ambitious goal. This will hopefully be my motivation to improve.

The goal?


The oldest person to ever summit Everest was 80. I have time, but only if I get on this NOW.

Even if I never quite achieve that goal, just getting on that path will bring immense benefits, so that's what I'm aiming for.

"So why are you telling us this?"

Because what I need is accountability. I have people in my life whom I love and who love me, but they're all too nice to push me the way I think I need to be pushed sometimes. My wife is really great but she's also an enabler, and if I asked her to bring me Pepsi by the gallon all day every day she'd do it even as I schedule appointments for kidney dialysis because of Type II Diabetes. So I love her, but she isn't much help here.

I also need tips. I don't mean advice. I mean tips. The difference? Everybody's different, and different diet/fitness plans work for different people. What worked fabulously for one person may catastrophically fail for another. So what I don't want is a bunch of "This is the foolproof diet plan that got me from 450 lbs to 210." What I'm asking for, is little tips and life hacks that people have discovered that I can gradually incorporate into my other activities for working toward this goal. Some may work, some may not, but my approach needs to be flexible and agile because I get bored easily and I need to work around that.

Climbing Everest is also insanely expensive so I'll need to save up for a few years. If I were fit enough to try it right now I still don't have the financial resources yet and that's fine. I'm opening up a savings account that I'll put money into when I can and in somewhere between 5-10 years I think I can do it. That's my time window. (I'm not asking anybody for help with money. Saving money is easier than losing weight, so getting in shape is where I need the help.)

The challenges:
  • Self discipline. I need to build that. If I had it already, I wouldn't need to lose weight now.
  • Food addiction. I am an emotional eater, and I tend to eat the most when I'm feeling discouraged or stressed. I also eat when I'm bored
  • I tend to like to eat things that are bad for me. (Unhealthy food is also cheap and specifically engineered to addict you. I have allowed myself to get hooked)
  • I am also an enabler, and when my wife tells me she's tired and doesn't feel like making dinner I encourage her to relax and just order something. That hurts us both.
So, fitness enthusiasts... Got any tips? Some drill-instructor-like motvation? Anybody else on a similar journey?

Anybody want in on this?

Climbing Everest is not just fitness level lol, the death rate for climbing Everest far exceeds COVID19 in chance of death if you try reach the summit, I highly suggest you get fit first then do some lower mountains to make sure you're physically and genetically able to go to altitudes that high.

I'd start with distance running in high altitudes, your main training that you need to do is getting accustomed to high altitudes.

In terms of getting fit, in shape and maintaining, it's quite easy, I've kept it up for over 12 years now, all you really need to do is;

Either 1x 45min CrossFit/f45 class every 2nd day and a Boxing/MMA class every other day, Sunday rest.
OR
Weights + a Run (10km) so Monday Chest + Abs, Wed Pull ups + Biceps, Fri Deadlifts and Squats Tues, Thurs, Sat = 10km Run and Sunday Rest.

Once you're at your desired weight and physique, do everything above but leave 1 extra day between each so Mon Chest + Abs, 1 day off, next day 10km run, 1 day off, next day Pull ups + Biceps, 1 day off and so on coz you're just doing maintenance now, no need for future progression.

As for diet, all you have 2 do is cut all processed shit and sugar, thats about it. Eat w/e you want that isn't processed or full of sugar. Preferably protein.
 

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The motivation comes from within yourself. If you start off slow and work on it everyday without pushing yourself too hard you will get there without an issue, it just takes a bit of time to accomplish your goals.

DO NOT start running miles to "jump start" your body. That's a good way to get a heart attack and collapse in the middle of nowhere. Start off with 1 hour daily walks, then gradually increase the pace.

The most important thing you can do is change your diet. Learn how to eat frequent yet lean meals. Count your calories and don't starve yourself. Oatmeal in milk, lean turkey, chicken breast, wraps, water, daily multivitamin, tuna, etc.
 

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Don't make the mistake of thinking you have to go to the extreme opposite end of where you are currently to feel like only then you've achieved satisfactory development.
If you want to lose weight and get fit enough to climb a mountain, then all the power to you on that goal, I wish you the best of luck, but even climbing one of the smaller mountains will end up feeling as much of an accomplishment as climbing the highest one from where you are now.
There's problems with aiming too high, like making it too daunting of a challenge that it becomes improbable to actually begin let alone achieve and you'll also end up undervaluing your progress and the relatively smaller accomplishments that can keep the journey enjoyable.
Best advice for a beginner is always to start small (also get a pedometer since you'll be doing a lot of walking if you're going to do this and those things are great at keeping walkers consistent).
I do agree with ENTJudgement that you should develop your experience with climbing smaller heights first before considering whether you want to risk climbing that high.
 

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I can't really advise you because I've always been terrible at losing weight, but I do think that food/drink affects it more than exercise, at least for myself.

If you are wealthy, it means that you can also afford food services for dieting--perhaps consider one of those services that provides pre-made meals for people who want to lose weight and then ask your wife not to go to the store for more food.

Then maybe have one day a week you can eat out on, like a date day.

Personally, I think that being healthy is more important than Mt. Everest, and while I'm not trying to rain on your idea I think it would pay off more for you to use money on what will help you be healthier and live longer, than saving up for an expensive trip like that.

Eventually you can get used to what portions and foods don't make you gain weight.

There are other mountains in the USA like Mt. Whitney too. It's the tallest mountain in the US and I've been there, it's quite beautiful. I just think that if given the choice to spend a bunch of money on your health or on Mt. Everest, it might be a better choice to just spend money on your health. There is a reason why, in wealthier nations, the wealthy do not struggle with obesity at the same rate as the poor. So take advantage of what your wealth offers you too, since it is really difficult for most people to lose weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks guys :)

Again, responding to specific sections to save space:

First book recommendation: The Mediterranean Prescription by Angelo Acquista. It kicked off the whole "Mediterranean Diet" movement. It's an oldie (pub. 2006), but to this day the Mediterranean Diet is considered the single most successful diet that allows you to eat normal foods. Check WebMD for more on the subject.*
Thanks, I'll definitely check that out.

Also, if you’re gonna climb Everest, I’d take a look at Alan Arnette’s blog. It’s my favorite place to learn more about the mountain and its climbers. Everest is definitely not on my bucket list but it’s very interesting to read about. It is strongly recommended to summit many other peaks and have other mountaineering experience before Everest. I think setting goals for smaller summits then working your way up to Everest will help keep you accountable and progressing.
I agree, the experience would be invaluable. The nice thing about Everest is that the mountain isn't that difficult technically... one doesn't have to be a lifelong mountain climber to handle it. The danger is the altitude.

Above all — You can do this. I believe in you.
😊

Can't say anything on exercising because I'm struggling with that too 😂 For food stuff:

1) West side of the world tends to have bigger portions as the norm. You can't do much about this when eating out, but at home you can get a smaller plate/bowl and use that instead. You get the satisfaction of seeing a filled dish, but it actually contains less food.
Definitely. When I eat out/order out, I try to divide the meal in half, and eat the rest for lunch the following day or something.

In terms of getting fit, in shape and maintaining, it's quite easy, I've kept it up for over 12 years now, all you really need to do is;
The challenge for me is I've been trying to find ways to exercise where I can keep using my brain or I get bored... So listening to audiobooks or podcasts is one approach.

The motivation comes from within yourself. If you start off slow and work on it everyday without pushing yourself too hard you will get there without an issue, it just takes a bit of time to accomplish your goals.
Yeah I've been endeavoring to make gradual changes that will remain forever.

Don't make the mistake of thinking you have to go to the extreme opposite end of where you are currently to feel like only then you've achieved satisfactory development.
If you want to lose weight and get fit enough to climb a mountain, then all the power to you on that goal, I wish you the best of luck, but even climbing one of the smaller mountains will end up feeling as much of an accomplishment as climbing the highest one from where you are now.
There's problems with aiming too high, like making it too daunting of a challenge that it becomes improbable to actually begin let alone achieve and you'll also end up undervaluing your progress and the relatively smaller accomplishments that can keep the journey enjoyable.
Best advice for a beginner is always to start small (also get a pedometer since you'll be doing a lot of walking if you're going to do this and those things are great at keeping walkers consistent).
I do agree with ENTJudgement that you should develop your experience with climbing smaller heights first before considering whether you want to risk climbing that high.
Yeah everything is in steps, precisely because I have no idea what my limits are in terms of what is possible. At my age, there's a limit somewhere.

There are other mountains in the USA like Mt. Whitney too. It's the tallest mountain in the US and I've been there, it's quite beautiful. I just think that if given the choice to spend a bunch of money on your health or on Mt. Everest, it might be a better choice to just spend money on your health. There is a reason why, in wealthier nations, the wealthy do not struggle with obesity at the same rate as the poor. So take advantage of what your wealth offers you too, since it is really difficult for most people to lose weight.
I think like most people I'm wealthy by some standards, not by others. I'd describe myself as middle class for my area, so I do have the ability to afford better food and access to exercise equipment/facilities.

Thanks all. It does help more than you know.
 

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The challenge for me is I've been trying to find ways to exercise where I can keep using my brain or I get bored... So listening to audiobooks or podcasts is one approach.
I assure you, if you're going 95%+ you will not be bored, you will struggle and feel like you can't go on and it will require every fibre in your body to continue the exercise. If u have time to be bored then you're doing low intensity exercises which u need to keep up for 10x longer than if u went with HIIT.
 

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The challenge for me is I've been trying to find ways to exercise where I can keep using my brain or I get bored... So listening to audiobooks or podcasts is one approach.
I have the same problem. Here are a couple suggestions.

When I used to run outdoors for my cardio training, I would find a really scenic route and simply entertain myself with the scenery.

But as I got older my knees started to give out due to the high-impact pressures of running. So I cut out the high-impact running and switched over to low-impact cardio in the gym: Stairmaster, bike, elliptical, etc. But that stuff is boring as hell, so I bring a book and reading glasses and use that for reading time. I strap the book to the machine with a bungee cord. That turns the exercise into highly productive time: Good for both a hard workout and getting some studying done.

As for weight training, most people get around the boring aspect of that by having earphones with good music or podcasts, and/or browsing their smart phones between sets. Personally I skip the smart phone and focus on having a really varied routine where I move quickly and easily between lots of machines. I have a little checklist of exercises, weights, and numbers of reps that I consult as I go so that I don't have to remember, and I just focus on getting the most out of the reps.

Anyway, those are just a couple ideas for you. I'm retired and I'm at the gym every single day, for an hour on cardio days and two hours on weights days. So it's doable. You just have to be proactive and figure out some little "hacks" for yourself so that you keep coming back for more across the years.

One more thing: You said you're middle-aged. For purposes of losing weight, I wouldn't try to to burn off the calories with lots of heavy exercise at your age. For one thing, your body just isn't as efficient at burning calories as you get older. So you'll tend to plateau a lot. And if you try to push past the plateau, you'll just get an injury.

Also, you said that you're 370 pounds. If you want to do cardio, stay away from the high-impact stuff or you'll trash your knees over time. (Note above, where I mentioned that I had to stop running as I got older.) Also, don't do any exercises with lots of fast squats involved. As an out-of-shape middle-ager with 370 pounds (no offense, but you're morbidly obese dude), you're practically begging for a knee injury. Start out slow and easy.

Beginners and noobs are particularly prone to knee and shoulder injuries, because those are poorly-designed joints and take a lot of stress. And at your age and size, you're at triple the risk of most other people. That's why obese people are often in motorized carts. Their knees are under a lot of strain from the weight, and any little wrong movement blows out the joint resulting in a major physical disability.

IOW, as you get older and fatter, the focus moves to just establishing a solid workout that works your body but doesn't strain it unnecessarily. That's to keep your metabolism up and not be sedentary. Meantime your main focus should be on dieting as your primary way to take the pounds off. Eat a lot of protein for fuel and to fill you up, and go light on the carbs and starches.

To sum up:
--Young people lose weight by working out hard, because their bodies can take the strain.
--Old people lose weight primarily by dieting, because their bodies will break down if they push too hard. So just develop a solid workout that leaves you pleasantly tired but doesn't strain you or wipe you out, and then focus on adjusting your food intake so that you lose weight at an acceptable rate. (Most experts say a pound a week is a healthy rate that won't strain your heart and system.)

Also, given your age, weight, and the fact that you don't have any prior exercise background, you may want to work with a trainer while you're getting started. Someone who is knowledgable about the physical limits imposed by obesity and middle age. (Most gyms can hook you up with a personal trainer. Just hire one for a workout or two to help develop a basic starter routine.)

Later, once you start getting down around 200 pounds and you're fit and buff and have a good routine, then you can start thinking about pushing the limits with some really hard workouts.
 

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My tip is to set more realistic goals, because the extreme ones are more likely to become reasons to quit when you are feeling tired and hungry and even in pain. Losing all that weight is a pretty hard goal in itself, you have to change so many habits you built over all your life, learn to manage your emotions and learn the practical side of eating better food. It's your personal Mt. Everest and just as worthy of scaling. I strongly recommend going to a dietitian or nutritionist, at least at some point, to guide you with your diet because it can become overwhelming and if you have no plan to fall back to you'll be more likely to make bad choices. I have a degree in dietetics and my own weight/eating difficulties so I've seen both sides of this and trust me, getting help is not something to shy away from when it comes to health and especially in your situation (obesity is no joke). When you start making changes you will not like it and that's the point when the real challenge happens and when you'll build discipline, so you need something more reachable to get your goal-reaching happiness boost. Being healthier isn't just an end goal, it's a process that never stops, and so you have to start by doing things your body can tolerate and slowly improve that. So you can't go starve yourself or do high impact exercise coz it will hurt you (even injure) and make you fail. I glimpsed the other comments and saw you saying you don't intend to do that, which is great, but I think it's important for me to say it as well. Others have given some good advice too.
 

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I agree, the experience would be invaluable. The nice thing about Everest is that the mountain isn't that difficult technically... one doesn't have to be a lifelong mountain climber to handle it. The danger is the altitude.
I suppose that would explain this...
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
To sum up:
--Young people lose weight by working out hard, because their bodies can take the strain.
--Old people lose weight primarily by dieting, because their bodies will break down if they push too hard. So just develop a solid workout that leaves you pleasantly tired but doesn't strain you or wipe you out, and then focus on adjusting your food intake so that you lose weight at an acceptable rate. (Most experts say a pound a week is a healthy rate that won't strain your heart and system.)
Thanks for the tips. And it's actually a little worse than I thought. I'm still low energy as I get over COVID so I've been sitting more than usual, and am up to 385. Ugh.

My tip is to set more realistic goals, because the extreme ones are more likely to become reasons to quit when you are feeling tired and hungry and even in pain. Losing all that weight is a pretty hard goal in itself, you have to change so many habits you built over all your life, learn to manage your emotions and learn the practical side of eating better food. It's your personal Mt. Everest and just as worthy of scaling.
It is, but with a more tangible, 'visualizable' goal.

I suppose that would explain this...
That's a huge problem and honestly worries me more than any other aspect. The friggin' crowds... Traffic jams can be deadly when you're up into the Death Zone.

So today we had a power outage and I went to get some firewood for the fireplace in case the power didn't come back on quick. Loaded this by myself and it wasn't too bad, even with my lower energy level.

Automotive tire Wood Road surface Asphalt Automotive exterior


Tire Wood Automotive tire Cuisine Car
 
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If hiking/climbing is the sport, then I would find other hikes and train by doing them; I would make a list of all of these hiking trails, might even start small: walk a lengthy nature trail with less of a gradient, and work my way up to a hills and mountains. Whatever is the nearest trail or hike from me, that’s where I’ll do most of my training; where I’ll do most of my exercise. I didn’t need to do gym to get fit, rather I’ll do gym exercises if I want to get an edge in competition; I believe all you need is the sport. The diet will come with it (How can I improve?) And drink a lot of water!
 
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