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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody,

I've been typing all my friends and family and I noticed a pattern. Everyone's J/P function seemed to be decided by their relationship with their nurturing parent/guardian. In a good relationship they inherited the parent's function and if they had a bad relationship they became the opposite.

Can anyone else support or disprove this theory?
 

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I don't think so. I don't feel like going into detail, but I do think that our types are genetic.

For your theory, I can say that both my parents are Js. But I can't say I had a particularly bad relationship with either them or that they may have effected me in such a way that that may have happened. I can also say that I think the Ne dominance was obvious in me from a very early age.
 

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My mother was an ESFJ and my father was an ISFP.

I couldn't stand either one of them.

No wonder I can't decide between my J/P.
 

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There are a few holes in this theory. One in particular is how you would collect sufficient statistical data to be able to come to any conclusion.

The things that need to be taken into account are:

1. Cultural differences. Example: In one culture it may be acceptable to beat your child and still have a good relationship whilst in others this is frowned upon and considered detrimental to any kind of nurturing relationship with your child.
2. Biological Parenting/ Adoptive Parents. Does the theory only work if the parent is biological? I thought functions were genetic?
3. Subjectivity. There is no base standard to indicate what is and is not "a good relationship". With no base standard all collected data may as well be thrown out the window.
4. Age. A teenager will view their parents in a different light as to that of a 20 something year old due to hormonal fluxes and developmental issues.
5. Circumstance/ Situation. At the time of questioning the person may have clouded judgment due to an event or circumstance prior.

Interesting theory none the less.
 

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My mother is an INFJ, my father an ESFP (think Marge and Homer). My mother may be a J but she wouldn't be near as J as I am. I nurtured this myself. I should have Pness because I was raised by more Ps in my life time :p .

If children are schooled by Js all the time does this determine if they end up J or P? No. Even P teachers enforce Jness.

I wouldn't regard it a theory either. It's a hypothesis.
 

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What you're saying is essentially another Nature vs Nurture. It's true that people are influenced by their parents ( Everyone really ) but it is also true that people have an innate ability to have certain characteristics. At a young age it's kind of a psychological issue of rebellion. If you ask your child to do X, he'll do Y. I guess parent's interest and opinions can influence you enough, but only at a young age. I guess you could gather more data as whether parents are the sole determining factor, and type of friends ( Peer pressure is extremely influential ), environment, psychological factors and family conditions should be considered. Just my opinion.
 

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While certain personality traits can definitely be influnced by parenting and upbringings, most things like function type are set in stone.

P and J is decided by what kinds of cognitive functions you use (i.e: the difference between using Fi or Fe. one is a judging function, one is a percieving function.)

I am the only perciever in my family, I grew up around 4 judger types. It pretty much had no effect though. I have a bit of experience using my judging functions, but it's definitely not easy and I have to force it. The fact is that I simply hate being constrained.

One important thing to recognize is that J/P is not a preference like the other functions, but a result of your other preferences. You can't necessarily decide to just think in a more J fashion if you're a P (and vice versa) because to do so requires you to focus your attention on many functions opposite of the ones you use, not just one.
 

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My mother was an ESFJ and my father was an ISFP.

I couldn't stand either one of them.

No wonder I can't decide between my J/P.
That makes sense, I was going to disprove the theory based on my parents, but I was only taking my mother into account and not my father for some reason. My mother is an INTJ, just like me, and I think my father is an ESTP. I didn't have a good relationship with either of them growing up, and I am very border line INTJ and INFP, the only thing is that the thinking process I use is VERY INTJ, even tho the INFP describes me perfectly, deep down I am and INTJ. I had a lot of emotional trauma as a child, which majorly brings out the feeler in me, emotional wreck, but as a kid, I always thought of logic first, then the feelings would come. With the P/J, I run from my emotional problems, but when I can use logic to solve them, I face them head on.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
There are a few holes in this theory. One in particular is how you would collect sufficient statistical data to be able to come to any conclusion.

The things that need to be taken into account are:

1. Cultural differences. Example: In one culture it may be acceptable to beat your child and still have a good relationship whilst in others this is frowned upon and considered detrimental to any kind of nurturing relationship with your child.
2. Biological Parenting/ Adoptive Parents. Does the theory only work if the parent is biological? I thought functions were genetic?
3. Subjectivity. There is no base standard to indicate what is and is not "a good relationship". With no base standard all collected data may as well be thrown out the window.
4. Age. A teenager will view their parents in a different light as to that of a 20 something year old due to hormonal fluxes and developmental issues.
5. Circumstance/ Situation. At the time of questioning the person may have clouded judgment due to an event or circumstance prior.

Interesting theory none the less.
All good points I'll have to take it into consideration. By the way by good relationship I meant whether or not the parent and child got along. Appreciate your input.
 

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My parents are both strong Js - I think an ESFJ and an ISTJ. Can't say I get along with them. There is mutual respect, but I don't understand them, and it's getting worse as I age. Yet, I'm an INTJ.

That said, I agree with the sentiment that types are mostly inborn - although I do suspect that you can, for instance, "coax" a less dominant function to action. I noticed this this summer, when I was alone in Chicago (I'm from the Netherlands) for business for two months. My Fi, which is reasonably developed back home, nearly shut off. As such, while I can be empathic, it's not my "base note".

As such, I do think that a good relation with a strongly F parent could get an INTJ better in touch with his inner F, but not to the point of turning one into an INFJ.

Another example: I'm a natural at math and physics. I'm not so good with languages, they take me a lot longer to pick up. Yet, after 20 years of practice, I'm reasonably proficient in English (which is a foreign language for me). However, I will never be able to pick up 10 languages on the drop of a hat, while I conceivably could do things like that in my area of strength.
 
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