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In school—in most public scenarios where I'm obliged to actually deal with people, I turn on the "charm". I turn the knobs from "reclusive" to "charismatic", humoring the people around me and somehow managing to be some source of comic relief. This is pretty much a euphemism, I act like a raging dumb-ass.

At an early age, one way or another I learned that if I somehow squeezed myself into a role where people were comfortable with me, where people were able to laugh when around me, they'd leave me be. Everybody loves the comedian. This has stuck with me through a good chunk of high school, and part of me doesn't really care about how many people expect me to be the "funny" one in and out of school, it's just irritating when I show the slightest hints of "potential intelligence" or someone catches me outside of my "comedic" or fun-loving persona and is shocked at how... relaxed and calm I am.

I really can't be mad at anyone other than myself, so I guess all I can do is shrug my shoulders and be happy that the friends I do hold close at least know the real bits of me. Whoever and whatever they are.

Anyway, I have a few questions for all you lovely people. To steer clear of unwanted situations or make things a little bit easier for yourself, do you tend to analyze the situation, create a scenario, and act accordingly? Have you learned how to read "human behavior" so you know how to act with certain people? Do you even act differently around certain people? Have some people taken a strong liking towards your "fake" persona and forced you to constantly act that way? Share your experiences and all the irrelevant information you want... I guess.

For the most part I size people up from the start, I take from what I can see from them impression wise and sort of add onto this as I get to know them more. If intuition tells me that this person is the "one" and worthy—cue immodesty—of my friendship, then slowly I start to reel 'em in.

Anyway, I'll end this with a generalization. Considering I'm a chick, I probably take the role of an actress more often than not. Y'know, women being oppressed and all that jazz. : |
 

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This is kinda like the chameleon thing with INTPs I think. Many INTP tend to act like those they are around after awhile. For this reason I would suggest to choose your friends wisely.

Myself I don't act much. I have before very effectively but I am getting old and too lazy for it. For me it has been and is more like a cultural anthropology. I study people around me and adapt. After I become bored with it I move on. I have a wider variety of friends than anyone I know. I remain myself, but I understand where most people are coming from. The opposite side of this is that I understand when people are being mean or stupid, and I react negatively at many people.
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Yes, I "fake it" around everyone. My family, friends and to strangers. I just ask a few open questions and see which questions give the most enthusiastic answer, then I just talk about that subject until I get bored and find something else they're interested in.

Its strange, even though I know a lot of people and I know what they like and dislike. They have no idea who I am and what I like but the sad thing is they think they do. Its like I'm living someone else's life and I'm just viewing it through their eyes... Sigh
 

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Many INTP tend to act like those they are around after awhile. For this reason I would suggest to choose your friends wisely.
I agree. When I was younger, I used to hang around a lot of ENFx. They liked me in the beginning because we had "so much in common". But over time, I became more comfortable and started showing a little more of my real self. That was when they accused me of "fast becoming an arrogant bitch".
 

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I can relate. I've been called a "chameleon" before. I actually think INTPs would make good actors, at least for short periods.

Emulating a personality is quite taxing, at least to me... after a while I just "crash". I then become very detached, to the point where someone asks me a question and I just stare at them blankly for 10 minutes before I actually start thinking of an answer. And I do feel sorry for those who have to deal with it, some are like: "Did I say something to upset you? Are you OK?" I want to reassure them but nothing comes out, almost like I'm not fully there. And then I need some alone time to reconnect with myself...

What's worse is when I can't control my emulation - kind of like a cartoon I saw long ago with a chameleon ending up in a museum's modern art section and becoming all twisted bits of color. It happens usually when I'm around aggressive people (not necessarily extroverted). So I try to avoid those personality types.

It makes having friends and socializing somewhat difficult; people tend to like you less as you start to like them more and become comfortable around them - and want to be yourself for a change.

Hmm, I hope this doesn't sound like I have a personality disorder... Though I might, who knows. :p
 

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I only do it in situations where it directly benefits me to do so. school, I don't care about- I think most people there think I'm weird- but if I'm at work, I'll tone it down. I don't see the point in pretending to be someone I'm not in order to attract people I don't want to be friends with, anyway. It sounds exhausting.
 

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I was thinking today of joining the circus lol!
I constantly find myself playing a role and sometimes it's not one I would like to play. I'm nice and nasty in equal measure.
Obsidean You need to stop playing a part in your own story and take charge.
Everyone finds it difficult to play a part, there's always pressure to be who they want you to be. I took acting as my first college course and I found I was good at immatating another person. It dosent make me any less me. I was just in a different place back then. We are good actors because we understand people.
Better to understand yourself, If I may say so.:wink:
 

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If anyone else in my year at school knew about MBTI types but they weren't close friends with me, I'm not sure they'd see me as INTP. I come off as that weird girl who did that crazy thingy that one time who's probably got some sort of disorder. I don't look shy or quiet to an outsider at school because I'm always around my very close friends, and they've pretty much seen it all. We're all comfortable enough to be openly insane around each other, and because openly insane feefafo is VERY LOUD, that's what people see.

If I didn't have constant backup, I doubt people would even know my name.

Of course, if I ever go to a new club or activity on my own and most other people there are all strangers to each other, I'm the comedian. I'm not so much 'the weird one' as 'the one with the socially acceptable level of quirkiness that can get a good laugh out of everyone'.

I think I've toned this down over time. It's tiring and I hate when people can't see past the weirdness. Maybe it's okay when I'm just going to be around this new crowd for a week or so, but it's damaging in the long run.
 

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I can relate. I've been called a "chameleon" before. I actually think INTPs would make good actors, at least for short periods.

Emulating a personality is quite taxing, at least to me... after a while I just "crash". I then become very detached, to the point where someone asks me a question and I just stare at them blankly for 10 minutes before I actually start thinking of an answer. And I do feel sorry for those who have to deal with it, some are like: "Did I say something to upset you? Are you OK?" I want to reassure them but nothing comes out, almost like I'm not fully there. And then I need some alone time to reconnect with myself...
I have the exact same issue. I can put on my social face for a good hour or two, but there's a limit to it. My poker face eventually comes back and I just sit there not saying anything or reacting to people's comments/jokes. Not because I'm upset, but because I'm mentally exhausted. How do extroverts do it?
 
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