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I was reading an article or two on the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). As some of you might know, I have a bad case of it and have had it since the day I was born, coupled with some hyperactivity. One article in particular talked about the advantages of a person with ADD and with its abundance in the United States, should it be a disorder or personality trait? Of course, the organized infrastructure of most institutions that people end up being situated in frowns upon the impulsive, the people who work in bursts of energy and accused of being irresponsible. The article I read in particular examined how the attention "disorder" is actually an adaptive trait. What got me in the article was that an ADD person would have been hailed or well-respected in a rural society. This means, all of those things I got into trouble doing for pursuing my interests would have been praised. If that was the case, would I be a different type?

If ADD was in fact part of my personality, then in no way would I consider myself an ISFJ.

Article: Personality Trait or Disorder

So I am interested in hearing all of your opinions. Do you think ADD is a disorder or part of your personality?

I will start by saying that it is part of my personality, it's in my writing, my language, my thought processes. Everything I feel or do is in bursts of energy. I know my interests though and I am very meticulous about them and I am happy that way. I also see myself stand out among people as different, something many ADDers take pride in. Also,independence. Since childbirth, I have been wired for fierce independence. I loved non-team sports. They allowed me to be competitive and maintain this independent mindset. I remember espousing tennis at one point. I liked being that way. I am generally a happy person until I get yelled at. Yells and punishment are what conditioned me to hold my impulses back.
 

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Not that I'm an expert but I honestly think people should just learn to cope with more lifestyles and attitudes instead of identifying everything as a problem to be dealt with. Especially when they try to give little kids addicting drugs. In my opinion it's really just the parents and teachers of the kids who don't know how to deal with energetic people so they drug them up to make them fit in. Such a horrible solution, they should be taught how to use their bursts of spastic energy instead.

Sitting quietly in a classroom isn't a normal thing for human kids, it's only recently that this has been imposed strictly in world cultures as much as it has. Kids running around being crazy is more normal. But that's only my opinion because I think the so many drugs and pills that kids take now are worse for kids than sugary drinks.
 

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Not that I'm an expert but I honestly think people should just learn to cope with more lifestyles and attitudes instead of identifying everything as a problem to be dealt with. Especially when they try to give little kids addicting drugs. In my opinion it's really just the parents and teachers of the kids who don't know how to deal with energetic people so they drug them up to make them fit in. Such a horrible solution, they should be taught how to use their bursts of spastic energy instead.

Sitting quietly in a classroom isn't a normal thing for human kids, it's only recently that this has been imposed strictly in world cultures as much as it has. Kids running around being crazy is more normal. But that's only my opinion because I think the so many drugs and pills that kids take now are worse for kids than sugary drinks.
Well, not all drugs are addictive, but I agree with the notion of over-medication and health issues arising due to institutions imposing an unnatural environment. Whatever that may be...

There was one drug I took in high school called Concerta. It was a stimulant. It helped me chose what I wanted to focus on better, but to me, it was mostly an anti-depressant. Once I stopped taking it, it was more difficult to stay focused on what I was required to do. The last time I remember taking the pill, I only remember being able to put my eyes on work I was completely disinterested in, but I would still multitask and peel away from the less interesting stuff. I'd be more productive, but with EVERYTHING..

I should say though that compared to other kids in my preschool and in elementary, I was more hyperactive than most when I was and I could accidentally turn reckless. I got kicked out of my first preschool because of my "bad" behavior. I think I was innocent looking back upon those days. I never wanted to be a bad person. I just put a lot of value on my own independence. I've had this attitude for as long as I can remember living.
 

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It is neither a disorder nor a personality trait. It is a condition. I am ADHD-PI and I feel myself to be blessed. It is through my struggles that I have become a better person.

Also I disagree with calling it a disorder. It's a chemical imbalance in the brain, not a deformation.

Hey, I'm a Concerta kid too!:crazy:

Oh and as for medicating children, in middle school I suffered from some mild PTSD (common in ADD patients since they often get their fair share of mental abuse from less than understanding teachers and peers who watch the teachers and learn how to ADD kid and in some cases parents)... I think it's fair to say I'm a little biased. Personally I would do anything to protect my child from many of the feelings of inadequacy that can result from clearly being bright enough to acomplish things at high levels but not being able to actually acomplish things for some unknown reason, it's frustrating, puzzling, deeply disconcerting, and discouraging. If medication does help, I feel it is downright abusive to deny a child the opportunity to learn and to function at his full potential, to know what it is to be successful, and to develop a healthy self-esteem.
 
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