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Do you think that AD(H)D is a disorder or difference?

  • Disorder

    Votes: 11 35.5%
  • Difference

    Votes: 10 32.3%
  • Depends on Environment

    Votes: 9 29.0%
  • Not Sure

    Votes: 1 3.2%
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm posting this to ask one simple question; Do you think that AD(H)D is a disorder/disability or simply a difference in brain architecture?

I believe it is a difference. The very fact that 5% of the population is believed to have ADHD makes me wonder how a 'disability' can be so prevalent. Not to mention that many people with AD(H)D tend to thrive and succeed in high stimulation jobs.

I'd like to hear your thoughts
 
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I have ADD and I say it's a disorder. I find concentrating ridiculously hard and it seems easy for other people. I mean, from what I've learned, autism is a difference in brain architecture but we still call it a disability.
 

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A disorder is not necessarily a disability, and it depends on the stigmas which are attached, and not the classification of disorder itself.

Also of course, any disorder is already a difference.

Benign fasciculation syndrome for example is a neurological disorder, but isn't very troublesome or debilitating except for in the most extreme cases. In fact, almost everyone has minor BFS episodes now and then. You know those tiny little twitches you some times get in an arm muscle, or your eyelid? That's BFS. Also, interestingly, people with ADHD seem to have it more often.

Edit: also please note that 'not necessarily' means 'not automatically'. As in it is not guaranteed but can still happen. I've had trouble for using that term a lot in the past but I have a habit of saying it instead of the more common 'not automatically' which is kind of my fault I guess.
 

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Depends. I believe there are very few people who have what I would say legitimate ADD/ADHD symptoms. Then there are kids who are hyper, don't do everything they're told for the sake of doing what they're told, are very creative, etc. and these kids make up the majority of those diagnosed. The fact that gifted children are diagnosed often should suggest that it's most likely not a "disorder" in many cases at least, in my opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Whether it impacts brain architecture or not is irrelevant. It can still be considered a disability if that were the case.

Whether it should or shouldn't be considered one entirely depends on your definition of disability.
Do you think it would still be considered a disorder if those with AD(H)D were put in an environment that would use the strengths of brain architecture rather focus on their weaknesses?

You know those tiny little twitches you some times get in an arm muscle, or your eyelid? That's BFS. Also, interestingly, people with ADHD seem to have it more often.
I can confirm this. Even as I'm typing this up, a part of my body is twitching or moving around...:tongue:
 
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I've never heard of this BFS. Is it the same thing as "tics?" If so, that is proven to be caused by certain medications, including Ritalin and Adderall...
 

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It's a disability so long as it prevents you from functioning to your desired capacity in your environment. It's a disorder so long as it fits the DSM criteria.

The 5% figure is probably due to over-diagnosis.
 

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I've read quite a bit that ADD symptoms can be caused by playing high (brain) activity games/activities. And that makes everything else very boring, which makes it difficult to achieve stuff.
 

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I feel that my ADD only is a disorder in our societal structure. What I've noticed is that my attention span is tailor made for being out in nature, I notice sounds, movements seemingly better than others who doesn't have ADD. I tune out when in nature as well, but to me it feels as if that's what my attention span is made for. In addition to that I don't get paralyzed, I act, do something instinctively when it's needed. And for whatever reason I seem to be able to make rather good decisions on the spot compared to others.

I've read quite a bit that ADD symptoms can be caused by playing high (brain) activity games/activities. And that makes everything else very boring, which makes it difficult to achieve stuff.
Where did you read this? Are you sure you don't mean ADHD-like symptoms?
 

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It's only a disorder if someone thinks not normal is a disorder, which comes down to philosophy and morals. Wait, no it doesn't. It comes down to insurance companies and their bills. Don't buy into that bullshit.

Attention deficits= a lot of feelings about multi interests
 

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I've never heard of this BFS. Is it the same thing as "tics?" If so, that is proven to be caused by certain medications, including Ritalin and Adderall...
No. Not tics, if you read my description it is actually a common thing that almost everyone experiences at some point. Tics are motor based and more complex.

I'm not surprised that you don't know what BFS is. It's one of those things that everybody gets, doesn't always remember having it, doesn't think about it, and when they realize what it actually is, they go "there's actually a name for that??"
 

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I believe that ADD is a disorder in the sense that it can sometimes act as an obstacle in the way of something that I want to achieve. I have been diagnosed with ADD and I take adderall for it and it helps tremendously in being productive and on task. A psychiatrist kind of explained it to me like this when talking about how the brain operates chemically: Imagine that your brain sends soldiers to the frontline to fight. When you have ADD, not all of the soldiers get sent, but the medicine sends in reinforcements so that enough soldiers show up to the fight.

I understood more about the complexities of the brain and organic chemistry than what he thought I knew, but he also was used to working with children and not young adults. Adderall just gives me the extra push I need when I need to be on task and focus on things. It really is a life saver for me.
 

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I have been diagnosed with ADHD for a long time and have greatly benefiting from medication.

It primarily affects one in a traditional education situations, and it is a learning disablity.

People seem to have this adversion to the word disorder, yeah it is a disorder but that doesn't mean the person is any less, they just require extra consideration if they are to suceed academically.
 
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it depends on the severity, extreme ADHD can start showing features of Antisocial Personality Disorder.


Back in the 60s and 70s (when it was called "Hyperkinetic Disorder"), research by Hans Eysenck showed a strong correlation between what we would now call ADD-h (hyperactive type ADD) and extreme Extraversion.
 

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Its a disorder and a difference....depends upon environment doesn't really make sense thou....even if you changed the environment, the disorder as it is still stands, just because they thrive or do better, the disorder still exists, you dont remove it because u change environment
 

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This neurologist seems to suggest that ADHD is, in fact, a cut off in the brain, between the frontal lobe and the cerebral cortex (I assume that's what he meant, although he didn't specify. I suspect he might be a scam, but I haven't ruled anything out.)

A 'blindness to the future'. Ironic, because, as someone with ADHD (passive), diagnosed at age 8, I think about the future quite a lot, and the many possibilities. Yet, at the same time, what he says is fairly accurate for my situation, at least.

I have difficulty organizing to that future, and toward doing the things I know how to do, despite knowing how to do them.

But, when I read about ENTP... It just made sense.

I'm pretty sure ADHD is a disorder. I mean, it's been verified as being one, hasn't it? They've looked at brains, and there's an area in the front lobe that doesn't develop completely. There is a marked difference between ADHD brains and .. Non-ADHD brains. And it doesn't seem to be a markedly helpful difference.
 

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I voted that it depends on the environment, but I think, for the most part, society pegs people in certain pigeonholes and if you don't fit a certain standard, you're not right, and you must have a disorder. I think, though if it gets to the point to which you can't work around it and function as a person, or complete simple tasks like household chores, it might be at the level of "disorder".I've heard about people who have worked around their ADD or ADHD and have gone through college with a good GPA by doing abt 5 minutes of one subject, and alternating to other subjects. I would imagine that an intelligent, resourceful person with ADHD would find similar ways to work around it in their everyday life.

I'm sending a TED which is about education, but I really liked the point toward the end about how educators feel about students who would easily be pegged as having ADHD and having something "wrong" with them, when they just have different intelligence.

Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity | Video on TED.com
 

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Disorders don't exist, period.

'Order' is arbitrarily defined, thus invalid. If 'order' is invalid, there is no basis for disorder, so it is also invalid.

(I really ​hate conformism.)
 

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I think it's a disorder that makes people act or react differently. Most of the individuals I've known with AD(H)D are adults. Depending on the severity, their behavior and reactions to situations can either be mildly "off" or intensely out of the ordinary. Most of the ones I know also have other co-morbid disorders such as depression, OCD, and anxiety.

Also, here's this problem going around in society that if a child is very intelligent, they cannot have ADD. In my experience, the two can go hand in hand. I've also worked with kids that were very smart, and were Autistic. I'd be stupid if I was to believe "You can't have anything wrong with you if you're smart." From everything I've seen, there's no surprise when I find out X kid had ADHD/Autism, but they're also very bright.
 
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