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I was thinking about this a little bit and started wondering if it was connected to type or not. What I was thinking about was the idea of at what age most people believe that they themselves, their kids, or even just people in general should move out from living with their parents and be financially self-supportive.

For me, the way my parents always looked at it was that as long as I was in school, they would completely support me financially. I was very blessed in the aspect that during the school year for both high school and college, I didn't have to get a job. During the summers starting my senior year of high school I got jobs, but not during the school year. I was very fortunate to be in a position where my parents could and would support me financially all the way through college.

I've always felt a bit spoiled by this, but in return, I had a drive to be self-supportive as soon as possible. Once I turned 23, I finished getting my Master's Degree and got a job teaching public high school. I've been living on my own ever since and am supporting myself financially. (I'm 27 now)

I've always felt driven to do this...it felt so extremely good to get to that point where I didn't have to rely on my parents.

My brother, who I think is an ENFP, wasn't like that. He's about a year and half older than me, and it wasn't until he turned about 27 that he moved out, and even now he still gets some help from my parents.


I read posts on here a lot about people who feel like their parents don't understand them, whether it's related to type or not. While I think emotionally I can understand how parents can be in the wrong and not do what's right for their kids, sometimes I feel like parents are just worried for their kids because they want them to be able to support themselves when the parents finally die. I know for me personally I would worry about that a lot if I had kids.

It's kind of led me to the belief in life that I'm always open and cool to whatever a person wants to do, even if it's weird...as long as they're able to make a living and support themselves. To me, I always think back to my own situation...I feel like unless someone's currently working towards that goal (being in school, for example), once they become an adult they should be able to make a living. The way that I see it is that you really don't have a right to complain about the way your parents guide your life if you're still living with them once you're an adult. (I understand it more for teenagers, but at the same time, they're also in the same boat here)

But it seems like in today's society more and more people are living at home at older and older ages, like my brother.

The main thing that stands out to me is seeing a number of my students. I understand them hating school, being bored with it, not liking the subjects, etc....but what I don't understand is being so apathetic that they just don't care about failing classes. As an ISFJ, I wouldn't be able to live with myself...I was so driven in school just to succeed for the sake of being able to one day get out on my own. I just keep thinking with some of these kids that they'll be living at home at least until their late 20's unless they figure out a way to work hard and get where they need to in life.


So I guess I'm just wondering how much of this is related to type, especially me being an SJ, and how much of it is just something that is personal, not related to type at all. Is it a generally accepted idea that people should be able to be self-supportive once they become adults, or am I being an uptight SJ to expect that of people in society nowadays?
 

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MOTM Jan 2012
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I was thinking about this a little bit and started wondering if it was connected to type or not. What I was thinking about was the idea of at what age most people believe that they themselves, their kids, or even just people in general should move out from living with their parents and be financially self-supportive.

For me, the way my parents always looked at it was that as long as I was in school, they would completely support me financially. I was very blessed in the aspect that during the school year for both high school and college, I didn't have to get a job. During the summers starting my senior year of high school I got jobs, but not during the school year. I was very fortunate to be in a position where my parents could and would support me financially all the way through college.
I have a similar set up with my dad.

This is the deal: If I work and go to college and pay for it, then I live at my dad's house with no bills and he lets me drive one of his cars for nothing. I pay for gas and my cell phone though. Paying for college hasn't been too bad, because I earned some scholarships, and that has helped a lot. The price for books is highway robbery, but I started buying them second hand from Amazon, and that has been saving me a lot of money.

So, I don't have the full brunt of self-sufficiency, but I'm certainly not ignorant of it.
 
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