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I’m always interested in what you’ve got, so this made me intrigued is all. It doesn’t matter how irrelevant.
I used to censor myself so much on this forum and I’d be over on the INFJ forum trying to condense my long posts for them but then they would ask all the questions that I had just cut and had to write it over again. After mentioning a few times “Dang it, I just chopped off a page explaining that...I will try to write it again” a few of the ones I am closer to were appalled. “Don’t delete anything.” They said. No need to try to condense. I realized that for the full Ne concept to actually hit and for them to then condense it themselves, there is a reason it takes us the length that it does.
Okay that’s random but...
“Don’t delete anything”. We want it no matter how irrelevant, with that awesome Ne Tridentus mind of yours... :).
 
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I’m always interested in what you’ve got, so this made me intrigued is all. It doesn’t matter how irrelevant.
I used to censor myself so much on this forum and I’d be over on the INFJ forum trying to condense my long posts for them but then they would ask all the questions that I had just cut and had to write it over again. After mentioning a few times “Dang it, I just chopped off a page explaining that...I will try to write it again” a few of the ones I am closer to were appalled. “Don’t delete anything.” They said. No need to try to condense. I realized that for the full Ne concept to actually hit and for them to then condense it themselves, there is a reason it takes us the length that it does.
Okay that’s random but...
“Don’t delete anything”. We want it no matter how irrelevant, with that awesome Ne Tridentus mind of yours... :).
Thanks. I won't rehash the one I deleted but I'll write and see what comes, for you- since you cared enough to speak up like that.. 😊. I tried to write a short version, but this has been a year of build up so it's probably not possible.

The post was originally titled "am I an ENFP". Past year I've increasingly realised certain truths about myself that I've.. I don't know what the word would be but I guess "blindsided myself" toward for whatever reason. I'll re-edit it if I can. The irrelevance was that I'm still fairly sure I am, although I would still be open to doubt if people have anything convincing to say. It's a very weird time for me to be honest.

I went in this direction of being a teacher and having this life in Korea, but it just didn't work for me, I couldn't imagine committing my life to this, and it developed a lot of self-reflection and more doubt about myself than I can remember since I was a teenager. Honestly, teaching, while it was challenging in a lot of ways, it wasn't challenging in any ways that were fulfilling to me apart from some of the positive interactions I'd have with the kids, most of it were boring and too "simple", the same things over and over, and the parts that were challenging were largely negative.

Firstly I knew I'd been in this trajectory where the "logical" part of me was becoming more and more interesting and fulfilling for years now. Then I found Jordan Peterson and found his stuff fascinating, I was diving myself deeply into a video game called DOTA for its deep level of logical analysis where I felt like I belonged, and then I found coding...

Coding.. It was the straw-camel-back-etc. that shook me. I've made posts on here about how I was good at maths but hated it at school on here before. It was something that I had this perspective about- I derived my joy from subjects like history and english where I was free to creatively analyse, and I held onto that notion for a decade. So of course, the idea of coding with all its mathematical principles, definitions, rules, etc. seemed like the worst idea in the world- but then through general exploring I tried it. I did some tutorial lessons just to see what it was like, and immediately I was filled with excitement. It was so fun- honestly it still makes me emotional. It's such a creative, logical, problem solving entity- not at all like how I thought it would be, and not at all like how teaching or any previous learning I'd ever done had made me feel. It's a year later and I'm on this path now fully, and 5 hours can pass by on a single problem- 15 tabs open on my browser as I bury deeper and deeper, it feels like it's been 30mins.

It got to a point where, I mean I'd just turned 28 in September, I'm 29 soon. It was difficult to look at what was staring me in the face after half my life believing the opposite, especially when I'd told my whole family I was doing this teaching thing. But in October I bit the bullet. I'm now back in England, part time working and self-studying in the trajectory I'm in now (specifically web development).

But the thing is, as soon as I got over that wall and embraced that side of me, it just escalated. It feels like it's changed my personality, I'm calmer now, but also quieter. I have two things I love that are all mine- coding and weight training. That's enough that I don't need the big social life I was always restless for, it's unnecessary now. It's very very strange, comfortable, and because of the speed at which it's happened somewhat unsettling.

But also, because of this change I sometimes feel like I don't relate to this forum as much as I used to. I remember when I first found this place, it was like I'd found my people, but these days the threads and posts, a lot of them I don't relate to that much. I was wondering if I'm an INTP, but if I am I'd be an odd one, but then at the same time it's opened a lot of.. internal doors? I guess? that made me realise who I really am when I just accept things and stop holding onto pre-conceptions about myself in many areas of myself.

So yeah that's the place I was coming from. It's so weird, people always talked about "doing the job that doesn't feel like work"- I was always so desperate to find it, I didn't realise I would ever find it, and it's changed everything. I took what it meant to be an ENFP so to heart that maybe that also didn't help, though like I said I'm also open to doubt. I did always feel I leaned more on that side than most here. But then also in a way I guess it doesn't matter.

So yeah missus, make heads or tails of that if you will haha...
 

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Thanks. I won't rehash the one I deleted but I'll write and see what comes, for you- since you cared enough to speak up like that.. 😊. I tried to write a short version, but this has been a year of build up so it's probably not possible.

The post was originally titled "am I an ENFP". Past year I've increasingly realised certain truths about myself that I've.. I don't know what the word would be but I guess "blindsided myself" toward for whatever reason. I'll re-edit it if I can. The irrelevance was that I'm still fairly sure I am, although I would still be open to doubt if people have anything convincing to say. It's a very weird time for me to be honest.

I went in this direction of being a teacher and having this life in Korea, but it just didn't work for me, I couldn't imagine committing my life to this, and it developed a lot of self-reflection and more doubt about myself than I can remember since I was a teenager. Honestly, teaching, while it was challenging in a lot of ways, it wasn't challenging in any ways that were fulfilling to me apart from some of the positive interactions I'd have with the kids, most of it were boring and too "simple", the same things over and over, and the parts that were challenging were largely negative.

Firstly I knew I'd been in this trajectory where the "logical" part of me was becoming more and more interesting and fulfilling for years now. Then I found Jordan Peterson and found his stuff fascinating, I was diving myself deeply into a video game called DOTA for its deep level of logical analysis where I felt like I belonged, and then I found coding...

Coding.. It was the straw-camel-back-etc. that shook me. I've made posts on here about how I was good at maths but hated it at school on here before. It was something that I had this perspective about- I derived my joy from subjects like history and english where I was free to creatively analyse, and I held onto that notion for a decade. So of course, the idea of coding with all its mathematical principles, definitions, rules, etc. seemed like the worst idea in the world- but then through general exploring I tried it. I did some tutorial lessons just to see what it was like, and immediately I was filled with excitement. It was so fun- honestly it still makes me emotional. It's such a creative, logical, problem solving entity- not at all like how I thought it would be, and not at all like how teaching or any previous learning I'd ever done had made me feel. It's a year later and I'm on this path now fully, and 5 hours can pass by on a single problem- 15 tabs open on my browser as I bury deeper and deeper, it feels like it's been 30mins.

It got to a point where, I mean I'd just turned 28 in September, I'm 29 soon. It was difficult to look at what was staring me in the face after half my life believing the opposite, especially when I'd told my whole family I was doing this teaching thing. But in October I bit the bullet. I'm now back in England, part time working and self-studying in the trajectory I'm in now (specifically web development).

But the thing is, as soon as I got over that wall and embraced that side of me, it just escalated. It feels like it's changed my personality, I'm calmer now, but also quieter. I have two things I love that are all mine- coding and weight training. That's enough that I don't need the big social life I was always restless for, it's unnecessary now. It's very very strange, comfortable, and because of the speed at which it's happened somewhat unsettling.

But also, because of this change I sometimes feel like I don't relate to this forum as much as I used to. I remember when I first found this place, it was like I'd found my people, but these days the threads and posts, a lot of them I don't relate to that much. I was wondering if I'm an INTP, but if I am I'd be an odd one, but then at the same time it's opened a lot of.. internal doors? I guess? that made me realise who I really am when I just accept things and stop holding onto pre-conceptions about myself in many areas of myself.

So yeah that's the place I was coming from. It's so weird, people always talked about "doing the job that doesn't feel like work"- I was always so desperate to find it, I didn't realise I would ever find it, and it's changed everything. I took what it meant to be an ENFP so to heart that maybe that also didn't help, though like I said I'm also open to doubt. I did always feel I leaned more on that side than most here. But then also in a way I guess it doesn't matter.

So yeah missus, make heads or tails of that if you will haha...
my first thought is that we ENFPs will never completely settle into 1 subject ever. No one subject will ever be completely enough... we couldn’t learn that way. Since Ne is trans-contextual, the more random things we understand and know then the more we can have ideas for whatever it is we are working on. I really don’t have any doubt about your being an ENFP. Look at ENFP Brian Cox, we can find great fulfillment in science and math and actually make it exciting for other people... but not that subject alone. We always need our rock band on the side. We always need some emotional outlets and we do need some Si things too that we usually built up habits of when we were young to hold everything together and keep our bodies healthy.

I do love my job. It’s people focused and requires a great deal of flexibility... but I can compare the way I approach it to the way my INTJ dietitian friend approaches it. In her time off she is still reading books written by dietitians about gastroparesis intestinal issues and whatever. In my time off currently I am learning to play my harp, continuing with voice lessons and working on my historical functions which right now means reading Old Norse, learning Inuit mythology and shamanism, learning about the spread and cultural times of the Black Plague and also the ideology of the witch trials. I also tend a garden and am always working to be the best mom I can be. Our polymathy just means we get better at whatever we are trying to do by knowing every random unrelated thing that we know. The more random things I know the better questions I have for what I’m currently doing.

A while back I watched a couple of long shows and radio shows about all of the things we had learned from Einstein’s physical brain. The conclusions were, he might never have come up with E=MC2 if he had not played the violin (he had an extra fold in his brain in between music and maths that would not have been there without the background in music) and he might not have built the mind that he did if he had not spent those years reviewing pattens. I personally count Einstein as an ENTP, although recently I’ve heard some voices out there saying ENFP. I’d have to look at it... but what I’m saying is. The great thing for us is continually learning, and if certain things aren’t challenging for us, then we have to work on other areas and subjects. Our brain will switch to wanting to do more and different. We want to be continually learning and that brings us back to coding for you. I’d say just to expect to always realize that for us all of our background will stack with whatever we are trying to accomplish right now. But I doubt we would ever settle completely into one thing.

Also our Ne and Te working together can be super enjoyable. Also I really don’t think that Fi isn’t logical... it’s logical in moral and feeling ways. It makes sense and learning math is a mind skill that Ne is fantastic in. I really don’t think there are any subjects that our minds aren’t cut out for if we are interested to learn it... and I think that’s true of the human brain in general, but kind of especially for ENFPs.

I think you’d enjoy Dario Nardi’s work in MBTI and neuroscience. for a few years there he was looking at mid-life growth in the MBTI types. He said once our brain gets certain things down it wants to explore its other functions... and then about a year Or so after that he changed his message again. He said “I thought a fewyears ago that I had learned all I could from Ni (he’s an INTJ) but then I realized further depths that I could access through utilizing the whole Ni-Se axis”

This is now what I’m starting to explore more of and recognize is the Si part of me, what it means for me... and it’s where I think my connections might be with home and with the build of experience. It’s very interesting to acknowledge the importance of the role Si plays in my character make-up and in what is both beautiful and conflicting inside me.

Yes...the description of ENFP starts to just be a loose skeleton instead of the core as we keep learning and exploring. And learning and developing these functions doesn’t make us less of an ENFP... it’s more to the point of understanding how MBTI descriptions should be understood with age and growth. Basically do the descriptions paint a good picture of any type at age 50 or 60 or beyond? I think we have to be the study. Whatever we are has to be the thing that defines the description, rather than the other way around.

This was a bit repetitive, but I’m not deleting. :). What are more of your thoughts?
 

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my first thought is that we ENFPs will never completely settle into 1 subject ever. No one subject will ever be completely enough... we couldn’t learn that way. Since Ne is trans-contextual, the more random things we understand and know then the more we can have ideas for whatever it is we are working on. I really don’t have any doubt about your being an ENFP. Look at ENFP Brian Cox, we can find great fulfillment in science and math and actually make it exciting for other people... but not that subject alone. We always need our rock band on the side. We always need some emotional outlets and we do need some Si things too that we usually built up habits of when we were young to hold everything together and keep our bodies healthy.

I do love my job. It’s people focused and requires a great deal of flexibility... but I can compare the way I approach it to the way my INTJ dietitian friend approaches it. In her time off she is still reading books written by dietitians about gastroparesis intestinal issues and whatever. In my time off currently I am learning to play my harp, continuing with voice lessons and working on my historical functions which right now means reading Old Norse, learning Inuit mythology and shamanism, learning about the spread and cultural times of the Black Plague and also the ideology of the witch trials. I also tend a garden and am always working to be the best mom I can be. Our polymathy just means we get better at whatever we are trying to do by knowing every random unrelated thing that we know. The more random things I know the better questions I have for what I’m currently doing.

A while back I watched a couple of long shows and radio shows about all of the things we had learned from Einstein’s physical brain. The conclusions were, he might never have come up with E=MC2 if he had not played the violin (he had an extra fold in his brain in between music and maths that would not have been there without the background in music) and he might not have built the mind that he did if he had not spent those years reviewing pattens. I personally count Einstein as an ENTP, although recently I’ve heard some voices out there saying ENFP. I’d have to look at it... but what I’m saying is. The great thing for us is continually learning, and if certain things aren’t challenging for us, then we have to work on other areas and subjects. Our brain will switch to wanting to do more and different. We want to be continually learning and that brings us back to coding for you. I’d say just to expect to always realize that for us all of our background will stack with whatever we are trying to accomplish right now. But I doubt we would ever settle completely into one thing.

Also our Ne and Te working together can be super enjoyable. Also I really don’t think that Fi isn’t logical... it’s logical in moral and feeling ways. It makes sense and learning math is a mind skill that Ne is fantastic in. I really don’t think there are any subjects that our minds aren’t cut out for if we are interested to learn it... and I think that’s true of the human brain in general, but kind of especially for ENFPs.

I think you’d enjoy Dario Nardi’s work in MBTI and neuroscience. for a few years there he was looking at mid-life growth in the MBTI types. He said once our brain gets certain things down it wants to explore its other functions... and then about a year Or so after that he changed his message again. He said “I thought a fewyears ago that I had learned all I could from Ni (he’s an INTJ) but then I realized further depths that I could access through utilizing the whole Ni-Se axis”

This is now what I’m starting to explore more of and recognize is the Si part of me, what it means for me... and it’s where I think my connections might be with home and with the build of experience. It’s very interesting to acknowledge the importance of the role Si plays in my character make-up and in what is both beautiful and conflicting inside me.

Yes...the description of ENFP starts to just be a loose skeleton instead of the core as we keep learning and exploring. And learning and developing these functions doesn’t make us less of an ENFP... it’s more to the point of understanding how MBTI descriptions should be understood with age and growth. Basically do the descriptions paint a good picture of any type at age 50 or 60 or beyond? I think we have to be the study. Whatever we are has to be the thing that defines the description, rather than the other way around.

This was a bit repetitive, but I’m not deleting. :). What are more of your thoughts?
Thanks 😊 . Yeah you're right, the trajectory we're on can influence personality and that is probably the state that I'm in.

I'll be honest, I'll never be a social champion or anything such like some ENFPs, I've never been inclined to be, and I'll always have my own subset of personality and take joy from analysing things, but it will always have a socially focused twist to it- I can't help it and never will, and I'll always have a prioritised moral imperitive in personal interactions even if I don't directly show it and tend to be more subtle or indirect about it.

There was an ENTP who replied to my thread in the INTP section that said it is a symptom of getting a bit older, and I mean common sense and general wisdom dictates that is true. I mean if an ENFP were acting as actively at 50 as they were at 17 it would be weird. Sounds obvious but I needed to be hit on the head with that.

When I compare myself to true INTPs I've met "in the wild", they're pros at being INTPs, they don't choose it they live it and they're not influenced by circumstance- they live it very consistently. I know as soon as I get into a house with people and start being more social with meetups/work I'll inevitably be that presence again, even if I'm more mild about it than I used to be, and whether I choose to be or not.

Honestly it's been an unsettling year, it's been sprung on me this sudden realisation about myself that I was so wrong about myself in that way, especially after I put aside so much of my early 20s "finding myself" through life experiences it didn't occur to me that career experience would be so necessary to find the final pieces at a relatively late age, but I guess if the pieces fall more wisely in the long run it will all have been worth it looking back later.

Thank you. It's been tough, I've had a difficult time resolving this with my family who wouldn't understand and haven't had anyone to talk to about my feelings like this, especially when it would have been fine if I'd done this when I was 24/25 instead of 28/29, but the important thing is that I'm here now. Do I wish I'd known this at 18? Hell YES, but then that would be cheating at life wouldn't it?
 

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@Tridentus. Because I’ve heard you talk about teaching and because I’ve known how driven you’ve been for the past few years along your path, and then arrived and was disappointed I can really see that this was huge. You thought your life was about to begin is the way I see it and I know you wanted to be settled and then hopefully find someone to build a family with as the next step in life. I can also kind of imagine how your family felt about all of this as well. I can imagine the amount of soul seeking and Fi changing/rebuilding that this might take. Actually, I’ve always found Fi destroying experiences difficult... it is hard to rebuild something as clear as you knew it before. This is also a part of aging... and I suppose in the long run it’s better... I guess? As I said it’s not pleasant. I HOPE that usually gaining wisdom, having to change directions and having things happen to you that you never expected and that then becomes perhaps the biggest story in your life...all of these things usually happen sometime in adulthood. And hopefully we become better people, more understanding and accepting and With more gratitude, right? But do PM if you’d like to talk in more depth, okay?
 
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If you think you are not an ENFP because you took an interest in programming and logic it's not a good argument as that can totally be within the interests of an ENFP. Plus, NE is very scientific-minded even if someone doesn't go into studying sciences per se. Your early childhood is more likely to help you in your type, NE dom kids are characterized by weak - unconscious judging and a more creatively experiential mindset (i.e. accumulating connections into bigger pictures), and generally quite interactive with the environment.
 

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@Llyralen
Thanks. That pretty much sums it up.

I mean my biggest hang up really is because of my "age", like I said if I'd tried teaching at 24 and then decided to change it would be no biggie- but it's actually a common occurance by all accounts to career shift into programming, and actually the field data shows that programming is one of the fastest growing industries for obvious reasons, and job supply will continue to outgrow demand for the next 30 years here in the UK. I actually think it's a huge error that programming/computer science is not a compulsary subject at school already considering we're seeing an exponential acceleration in that direction. The world and people's lives will be a very different place in 30 years, and that will mainly be driven by tech, as has been the case for the previous 30. This field is also probably the most future proofed outside of academia.

It also occurs to me sometimes that I am very very lucky that I'm in this position in a lot of ways, to be able to make mistakes to learn from and still have the opportunity to make the correction, and that I shouldn't ever forget that. Far from everyone has the same opportunities.
 

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You always came off as ENFP to me. And all ENFPs come from different backgrounds and different experiences, so it's really only fair to understand each other on an individual level.

Also, teaching has always seemed to suit more of NFJ and NT personalities. Some of the BEST teachers and most effective I had were all either ENFJs, INFJS, and NTs, and one ENFP (who still has a profound effect on me- but he sort of got pushed around a bit- political reasons at school- my guess- he was one of the most empathic).

I remember your experience with that kid who pushed your buttons. It's best to not judge yourself so harshly as you were new to teaching (especially Junior High School- mad props and kuddos to you! they are a TOUGH crowd).

I definitely can see ENFPs being great teachers as well as INFPs. SPs were also great teachers, too. Laid-back. INFPs, you don't run into too much. But yeah, definitely, teaching is a highly "J" functioning skill that doesn't always come as smoothly for Ps (lesson planning-very meticulous amounts of work, grading, attention to detail). And NTs are really great at teaching, because they tend to be more structured naturally, and their abilities to sit and research and to accurately provide information is stellar. The ability to encourage students to think critically. INFJ/ENFJ teachers have a charm to them. ENFP professors, they're great at emotionally encouraging students (sort of like the character Patch Adams played by Robin Williams- they're very humanistic).

So, I don't think it's you per se that should cause you self-doubt. And if you're teaching internationally, there is still a cultural barrier. I hear that in Asia, they prefer Caucasian teachers and value them more over non-Caucasian (because their English skills are more advanced- I personally am very bad a writing in English so not it's easy... you're throwing yourself in treacherous waters). And, I understand why people from Asian countries would deem Caucasian teachers as more effective (I don't think they're being racist- but they can be- Asians, like other minorities, and everybody else on this planet can be biased).

In this case, you're dealing with A LOT (and having to adjust, too, in a foreign country- even if you might somewhat speak the language it is never easy- it's like having a dual-identity citizenship- or at least having to adjust to it- being from one country, and your entire identity is melded with the culture, and moving elsewhere for work, you have to adapt to the mannerisms, social cues and etiquette that's exciting to learn but can cause a bit of confusion at times- so it doesn't imply anything about your MBTI.
 

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I actually think it's a huge error that programming/computer science is not a compulsary subject at school already considering we're seeing an exponential acceleration in that direction. The world and people's lives will be a very different place in 30 years, and that will mainly be driven by tech, as has been the case for the previous 30. This field is also probably the most future proofed outside of academia.
I agree it is quite an error that nowadays students get hands on to software development / programming too late. Luckily I have had a chance to be into that already since the end of my basic school ages and been in that industry till now (and counting).

I can tell from my experiences that Ne is a very useful mindset in that industry as remarkable amount of the technical development requires top-down approach - first you figure out a "skeleton" of your solution and then fill it with details later. Combined with Ti, it works it's best on figuring out deeply technical solutions while combined with Te, it's powerful combination for keeping up team spirit, leading projects/teams and so on.

You'll learn to heavily use both Ti and Te over years in such environment :) But there are also other types of tasks which are Si-heavy (ie configuration management / deployment processes) and those are which I try to delegate to somebody else as much as possible - if you're ENFP I guess you won't like those type of tasks too much either :)
 

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I agree it is quite an error that nowadays students get hands on to software development / programming too late. Luckily I have had a chance to be into that already since the end of my basic school ages and been in that industry till now (and counting).

I can tell from my experiences that Ne is a very useful mindset in that industry as remarkable amount of the technical development requires top-down approach - first you figure out a "skeleton" of your solution and then fill it with details later. Combined with Ti, it works it's best on figuring out deeply technical solutions while combined with Te, it's powerful combination for keeping up team spirit, leading projects/teams and so on.

You'll learn to heavily use both Ti and Te over years in such environment :) But there are also other types of tasks which are Si-heavy (ie configuration management / deployment processes) and those are which I try to delegate to somebody else as much as possible - if you're ENFP I guess you won't like those type of tasks too much either :)
Thanks, Yeah I can get a whiff of that. Learning web dev- I'm obviously going in with the basic HTML/CSS/Javascript "starter pack", and advancing into React/Node, and learning backend API/database stuff just to round myself out. After that I suppose the next step will be to scout what recruitment is looking for and target those languages. Really Javascript seems to be the core which separates the most and least skilled so far because of its basic raw nature, though I've only scratched the surface- that's what's really exciting. I do also find the backend stuff interesting with APIs, database configuration, etc. I can see the Si aspects as well that will become more of a factor in the actual job, but that's the case with most any day-to-day job.

Yeah I've found my Ne so far to be a huge asset- when I find issues and sticking points- my Ne explodes with possible solutions and that is my particular strength for sure, the fact that I can brainstorm and experiment with different tracks of thought/perspective very quickly, and I'm already finding pattern connections to be vital, the ability to connect previous projects and how they interlink in unexpected ways to logic patterns in a new one. The freedom to experiment in that way and find multiple routes to an answer, is maybe the most exciting part- and then seeing the alternate solutions that other people come up with is such an eye-opener. I get what you're saying, filling in the details is less fun, but at the stage I'm at going from having the solution in theory in different pieces all over my tabs, and then proving it by putting it together through concrete application (which is technically supposed to be the less challenging part) of filling it in is exhilarating, and then when you run it on server and it works- man that feeling... The rush.
 

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@Llyralen
Thanks. That pretty much sums it up.

I mean my biggest hang up really is because of my "age", like I said if I'd tried teaching at 24 and then decided to change it would be no biggie- but it's actually a common occurance by all accounts to career shift into programming, and actually the field data shows that programming is one of the fastest growing industries for obvious reasons, and job supply will continue to outgrow demand for the next 30 years here in the UK. I actually think it's a huge error that programming/computer science is not a compulsary subject at school already considering we're seeing an exponential acceleration in that direction. The world and people's lives will be a very different place in 30 years, and that will mainly be driven by tech, as has been the case for the previous 30. This field is also probably the most future proofed outside of academia.

It also occurs to me sometimes that I am very very lucky that I'm in this position in a lot of ways, to be able to make mistakes to learn from and still have the opportunity to make the correction, and that I shouldn't ever forget that. Far from everyone has the same opportunities.
I’m from the Silicon Valley- computer programming and coding are introduced as electives since middle school and children as young as 5 are able to sign up for coding classes or enrolled in computer camp. My 8 years old son and 5 years daughter are currently enrolled in python coding classes for kids ( they asked if they could learn ) .
Anyhow it’s a norm for Ne dom to jump careers or try out variety of different careers . I have many infps and isfp friends who works as software engineers or computer engineers. I don’t think being good in math or being able to code deals much with mbti type or cognitive functions- more so if you’re Asian( not saying all Asians are good at math but most are and it’s a norm for them to work within the field of engineering or tech ).
It’s a norm for Ne doms to jump or switch careers and since the type enjoys variety the careers may be in entirely different field - at 25 I was a paralegal secretary for a public defending office- by 30 I was running a family child practice/play based school .
 
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I strongly believe that your teaching years will pay off. I commend you for seeing it through till the end. Connecting the dots only makes sense once you look back (thanks Jobs). You'll probably face something similar down the line, but this shouldn't discourage you. There will come a time where you will morph all of your experiences into something lucrative and worthwhile, and because you have certain expertise in some areas, you'll be able to forge your own path . I can already see an alternative where you create a tutoring business that emphasises on programming. Question though, was there a certain way of teaching you enjoyed more in your time as a teacher? I ask because Enfps thrive in a more OnevsOne or small group settings. Look into Tim Ferriss- the specialist generalist, for more insight about the programming and teaching stuff I talked about.

And about feeling off about your personality, I believe it to be age and maturity, you're seeing new sides of yourself which is pretty normal (going through something like that myself, realised I'm not that invested in people like an Enfj, I'm more detached yet interested in people, oh the paradox🤣).
Not making light of the situation because I definitely feel you on the age bit, but we gotta work off our strength here ( which is hope btw lol).
Stay strong bro, I use to read your posts years ago when I was lurking here, you've come along way, keep at it💪🏽
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
@Wordplay
Thanks I agree. I took an enormous amount of learning away from teaching about what I want and need in a work environment, and of course yeah I did take skills and experience away from it.
That's funny yeah I preferred the one-on-one engagements for sure.

Other than that it was the lesson planning that I enjoyed the most, the formulaic creativity that was involved in that.

I definitely see it as a necessary barrier I had to encounter. You know, if you don't know certain things about yourself, and it's inevitable you're going to have certain blind spots, the best thing you can do is to encounter them, so that you can have that realisation. There is a variance in just how wrong you can be, sometimes it takes an adjustment, sometimes it takes a phoenix-rebirth concept type experience, and this was great enough to be more the latter, but it's been a positive thing. I learned something more intrinsically fundamental about life in the process too.

It's also helped me delve deeper into psychology and development which has been interesting. I actually don't listen to music anymore (except for when I exercise) I just listen to podcasts and commentaries. Regardless of type, my personality change has been pretty huge, this has easily been the most defining year of my adult life so far.

I'll see in the future about where I could take programming, the possibilities go into pretty much every industry and possibility, it's just about building a foundation of experience for now.
 
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