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The only point that I agree with in this video is that the U.S. media and its society glorifies violence to an unhealthy level.

However, I tend to roll my eyes whenever someone argues that things like television are degrading the quality of our lives. Television reflects the problematic elements of our culture just as much as any other entity produced within it, but I don't think that the existence of it itself is harmful. I really don't see the problem of having an outlet for escape, just as long as it doesn't completely consume one's life.
 

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Like with a lot of NF-ish type things, I'm pretty mixed on this one.


I think the big place that I tend to disagree with NFs is the sense of perfection and idealism that they tend to strive for. Sometimes it seems like NFs are satisfied unless every single person is taken care of and is perfectly happy.

For me, I tend to focus more on what's realistic to happen in my lifetime. I tend to try to be more satisfied for what is already there and to be happy with what I've got.

But, I tend to agree with the intentions of NFs. I tend to want people to be happy and want to find ways for them to be.


So in a similar way, I think this video seems to over-dramatize the situation. I don't disagree with the general vibe/message of it, but I don't think it's that big of a deal. I don't think society is empty or crumbling or anything.


First off, there seem to be a few mixed messages here. He starts by attacking electronic devices because they're fake...you can't smell or taste or touch them, so that makes them inferior to eating or making love or whatnot. To me, if that was true, that would mean reading a great work of literature, admiring a piece of art or enjoying a quality play/film would also be "fake" and inferior. I don't see that at all...I think a person can be just as profoundly moved or influenced by these sorts of things as they can by more physical or sensory types of experiences.


Now, you could argue that there's a huge difference between reading a literary masterpiece and watching a piece of junk TV show. While I agree with that point, it has nothing to do with all of the sensory stuff he mentions.


But then I think you get caught in the subjective argument of what has high quality. While I do think it's best to find a balance of learning/improving one's mind and enjoying oneself, I don't think people should be faulted for what they enjoy. I think people have the right to be happy in whatever way works best for them, and I don't think it matters if what they enjoy in their leisure time doesn't have much intellectual merit.



However, I do agree that a lot of times people, including myself, do get stuck in ruts and bad habits where there's not as much balance. I think part of the problem is that we do have to work so much, and part of it is that entertainment is so easy to come by that we get spoiled and get used to it. I do think it's importance to find balance so that you don't just watch TV all day as soon as you get home. I do think it's important to spend time with others just having conversations, and I do think it's good to enjoy other activities too.


But I think plenty of people in our society still do this. While the electronics can be inhibitors, I don't think they fully keep people from doing other things. Plenty of people still enjoy outdoor activities, reading, hobbies, or just doing things together. People can play pool or board games and enjoy that just as much as video games and watching sports.




So like with most things, I think moderation is key. If someone has that, then it doesn't matter if they enjoy electronic things, and I don't think they ruin our society or make our lives meaningless.
 

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This may be the NF view of the world, but definitely not my view. While the narrator is stating that people are continually being isolated from each other because of technology, I don't necessarily live my life in that manner. (I'm out with my dog at the park, playing with my kids, volunteering in my community, volunteering with my children's activities, finding something new to see, etc.) I almost tend to believe that the video is more of an INTROVERT thing. I trust people, I love people and I'm not afraid to help people. (It doesn't mean I'm an extrovert.) I do find NFs to be incredibly whiny about the world and it's problems, but yet they are slow to do anything about it. Perhaps it is because they see it in such a large scale that it becomes overwhelming to them. For me, I would rather give out acts of kindness where I can to plant seeds of positivity. I much rather see the world this way:


It's smaller scale yes, but "paying it forward" in kindness WORKS. It's your choice how you want to see the world, but while I'm living in it I will see it for it's possibilities and not it's limitations.
 

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I agree with what everyone else has said so far. It's a bit over-the-top in its conclusions. I tend to get a little frustrated with "the world is ending" "society is crumbling" and "electronics are evil" kind of things. There are times when I love to sit in the evening and watch a favorite TV show with my husband. We love to talk about the show and laugh at each other's reactions to the story and characters. My response to this video is....ok....how does this affect me in my everyday life? Are you proposing everyone throw out their TV? Should I feel guilty for those times I enjoy with my husband watching our show?

I encounter some of this kind of stuff in my family. I have two aunts who are very "NF" and love to post things on Facebook about how society is crumbling, organic food is the cure for everything, conspiracies about the healthcare world, how you should feel about certain political people, and how living next to nature and not going to the doctor are the prime ways to "buck the system". They follow all this idealized stuff and their children are, by default, brought up in all of it, and are in some ways not benefiting from this lifestyle. It's almost like they are being used to advocate their parents' idealism. There's always something bigger they are "advocating" for.

I'm not saying people shouldn't have ideals or shake things up, or advocate...but sometimes it is important to be careful how you go about it--because people can be affected. I don't know, I would just prefer to live my life without having to follow "something bigger". I would rather live my life in kindness and empathy, take care of my family and friends--and live out my values in a plain and simple way. Does that make sense? I feel like I was rambling...

Just wanted to add, in case I sounded too negative...I am thankful for the idealists of the world...they expose problems and instigate change in our world...but what I am concerned with is how the details affect us, and there are implications too to be considered whenever changes are made.
 

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I'm not saying people shouldn't have ideals or shake things up, or advocate...but sometimes it is important to be careful how you go about it--because people can be affected. I don't know, I would just prefer to live my life without having to follow "something bigger". I would rather live my life in kindness and empathy, take care of my family and friends--and live out my values in a plain and simple way. Does that make sense? I feel like I was rambling...

Just wanted to add, in case I sounded too negative...I am thankful for the idealists of the world...they expose problems and instigate change in our world...but what I am concerned with is how the details affect us, and there are implications too to be considered whenever changes are made.
Idealists are definitely a needed force in the world because they help us move forward and evaluate the big picture.
Having said that, I do wish that some of my idealistic friends would remember to keep their feet planted on the Earth and to focus on the people and the things that need their imaginative way of thinking! I guess that's what we do as pragmatists, keep the idealists in check and remind them to do their laundry.

I do realize that SJs can be idealistic and dissatisfied with their current environment and global problems, but I think that at the end of the day, we're a bit more pragmatic about it than NFs. Personally, I would rather improve my life and my surroundings first before helping someone else because how can you help someone else if you can't help yourself?
 

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I'm copying/pasting my post from another thread because it fits here as well (The thread is in regards to whether you prefer Ss or Ns.)
I think the main point is to achieve a relationship where mutual respect is given for the desired emotional connection. I don't like a partner to place expectations on me that I cannot meet, especially those that are emotional. It's not something I can change, because I am always somewhat emotionally modest to everyone around me. I don't want people to know or have 200% of me. This creates a feeling of overexposure and insecurity within myself. A healthy relationship to me is two independent individuals who enjoy each other ... which is what I have with my ISTJ husband of 15 years.

I really think placing these emotional expectations is setting up your relationships for failure. People open up at their own pace, and it's self centered to think that it has to be on your timetable. As much as I adore "NF"s, they tend to create problems that weren't there in the first place. I consider myself to be extremely "down to earth" and practical, and constantly lending my ears to NFs with problems. What I see is a milking of my encouragement to better themselves, and then I am left dry ... with no reciprocation in the exchange. I know I am allowing it, and it's in my helpful nature to do so. What I realize is that most "NFs" do not possess the ability to empower other people, which are words that I need to hear from time to time too.
 
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