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Fellow NT-s, What do you think of this:

Did a test and brought a negligible result in kinesthetic learning technique. A friend of mine said maybe because I have a stage freight. I don't see a logical meaning but it lead me into something meaningful.
A person as experienced as me on stages I still get nervous and physically shaking.
YET when people watch me, normally during the day, I don't get nervous. When I walk, sit, pretend I'm sleeping or anything it's not that big of a deal for me.
So I thought, is it because I don't care about those are owl-style-watchin me but when I'm on stage I care about them?

An other theory,
Does self-confidence aspirate the attention on the self instead of caring about the public/audience? :p

SOOO,
Can we define self-confidence as some kind of extroverted skill in this domain?
(As in better in performance. As most of introverts myself don't move a lot).

I'm eager to know your analyses too,
Thank you for your time!:kitteh:
 

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Seems to me that when you go on stage you are under pressure to give a specific performance. Don't know if you act, sing, dance, or what, but whatever you do, it is supposed to be done as rehearsed and, moreso, in keeping with the author's vision. Add to that an audience that may or may not know how it should play out, but expecting something from you that looks rehearsed and polished, and you have a kind of pressure not otherwise an issue.

I sometimes have to attend meetings where I am providing important information to the people at the table. I also occasionally train people. In both situations it is important (to me at least) to present myself as knowledgeable and worthy of their audience. I get stage fright before I begin, I am nervous when I start, I have to focus on my breathing while I'm doing it, etc...

Again, I think it's the implied expectation of the watcher.

To reinforce that, a lot of people in radio don't feel stage fright because they are in a small room with microphone and, interestingly enough, headphones on where they can hear their own voice. Something about this makes it all seem very audience-less, thus the ability for people who have never been on the air to be pretty cool for their first time.
 

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Interesting. I was a dj for a few years I wasn't afraid at all.

Took acting in college... I was afraid. I don't think it was really fear of what others thought exactly. At first I was fine but it is possible the pressure of missing a line or not performing the part exactly right well that made me afraid. You only get one shot at it. I don't like that aspect. I like pencils because I like erasers. :/

That is one of the hard parts about public speaking. You only have one shot to get the idea across accurately. No erasers.
 

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*hugs you all*
 
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For me when I preform, it's more about me not letting myself down. I've probably practiced for hours on getting this one thing right, and to only have one chance to show all my effort is stressful. I'm not only showing other people what I can do, but it's just as much about me doing what I want to do perfectly once. I used to have an issue where I'd freak out internally if I'd make one small hardly noticable mistake during piano recitals, and my self confidence would plummet because I didn't do it perfectly, and as a result I'd make more and more mistakes. Thank goodness I've gotten over that and stopped caring about errors I make to the point where it hurts me. It happened during practice too. I'd give myself one chance to play through perfectly, and when I didn't, I felt so bad about myself. During preformances, it just felt more definate.

So in short, I never cared about the audience, I cared about my own self percieved competence, I suppose. It just so happened on the "ultimate judgment day" people were around, but it was more of an internal struggle.
 

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So I thought, is it because I don't care about those are owl-style-watchin me but when I'm on stage I care about them?
Yes, this, most likely.

Stage fright seems to be one of the most common fears people have, due to the pressure to perform well.

Have you ever truly screwed up? I found it was the most liberating thing ever once it finally happened to me. My mistakes were even worse than I imagined, but nothing horrible happened; in fact, people came up to me afterwards to tell me how much they admired me for continuing instead of freaking out and giving up.

Unless you're actually on Broadway, the pressure is largely in our own heads and most people are rooting for you to succeed.
 

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Yes, this, most likely.

Stage fright seems to be one of the most common fears people have, due to the pressure to perform well.

Have you ever truly screwed up? I found it was the most liberating thing ever once it finally happened to me. My mistakes were even worse than I imagined, but nothing horrible happened; in fact, people came up to me afterwards to tell me how much they admired me for continuing instead of freaking out and giving up.

Unless you're actually on Broadway, the pressure is largely in our own heads and most people are rooting for you to succeed.
Hmm I guessed so...

Well, no I don't freak out, and as you said I carry on too. It's just the extreme pressure on me. I can't handle pressure.
Like it's an obligation and everyone's expecting the performance...I don't know.

I don't think, here, I can ignore the audience. The doctors in the uni take in consideration everything within someone's performance. And if I don't mingle with the audience I won't have good results -.-
 

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Hmm I guessed so...

Well, no I don't freak out, and as you said I carry on too. It's just the extreme pressure on me. I can't handle pressure.
Like it's an obligation and everyone's expecting the performance...I don't know.

I don't think, here, I can ignore the audience. The doctors in the uni take in consideration everything within someone's performance. And if I don't mingle with the audience I won't have good results -.-
My wife and I attended a wedding for a friend where they asked me to photograph the wedding. Aside from the fact that I didn't like the idea that they would "invite" my wife and to be guests, but expect me to work too was really kind of crappy, the reality is that I had major flop-sweat going on. My flash was giving me trouble and not firing when I needed it to. I missed the 'kiss the bride' shot completely because of it. I survived that, but when I had to do the group and family shots after the ceremony it got worse, and at the worst possible time. I was pouring sweat. Everyone was looking to me to perform. I was alone on this proverbial stage with everyone standing around watching me with expectant smiles, and my equipment was failing. I tried some workarounds but anything that would really work required time, and I was too freaked out to just ask everyone if I could take a break, correct the issue, and come back to it. Had I done that, I could have taken great shots for them. Because I didn't, some of them are total failures that I will never show them.

Upset, I told my wife and the groom what happened, and told them that I should have just asked everyone to go have fun until I configure a new setup and we'd get back to it, and they said that would have been perfectly FINE. They said that I was the expert and they were just the audience, and they would have followed along with whatever I said or did.....

So what's the lesson I learned here? That the audience is "just watching", and I (for that moment) AM the show, and I can and SHOULD control it. That doesn't mean I can always BE in perfect control.... Mistakes and equipment failures happen. But it's what I do THEN that counts. So if you trip on stage or trip up on your lines, that doesn't mean the show is a failure, that just means you need to temporarily adjust, ad lib, until you can bring it back on script..... Hey, in a live performance, there's no 2 second delay. Laugh at your mistakes and the audience will laugh along.
 

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I think the idea that you are providing the audience with an execution of some kind of artistic expression can be a lot of pressure to carry if you are passionate about what you are doing. It's a reflection of yourself, it's part of you and therefore in some way, personal. And that makes you vulnerable. It's like cooking a meal and watching everyone try it, anxiously waiting for their reaction. Putting yourself out there, no matter how apt you in your expertise, involves that kind of vulnerability. Also, the fact that an audience varies, their reaction to your performance may too. I think it's normal. Perhaps using it as an adrenaline rush, to pump you up may help?
 
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