Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

I stole this from INFP subforum. It's pretty interesting so I wanted to share it with you too! I didn't look if you already had this though, so let me know if it's a repeat!

https://mindtrackers.com/personality-test

Have fun!

My results:
 


Your personality type:

Advocate
(VDI-M)

Nature
88%
Visionary

Tactics
52%
Diligent

Energy
60%
Introverted

Identity
Motivating

Advocates are a rare personality type. Beneath their quiet, stoical exterior, Advocates’ minds and hearts hum with the force, energy, and mystery of the universe. Their tenacity, strength of character, and self-confidence shouldn’t be underestimated, even though these traits may not be immediately obvious.

Advocates run deep. They cherish authenticity in everything they do, and they hold themselves to strong ethical principles. Among all personality types, they’re the least likely to take something that doesn’t belong to them, accept credit for other people’s work, or keep excess money from a cashier.

Seemingly superficial motivations like money or fear of embarrassment seem petty to Advocates, compared to the prospect of making a difference in the world. Advocates are passionate about good causes, but they don’t stop there. They also take decisive, concrete actions aimed at making a difference, helping people and animals through volunteer work, philanthropy, and aid whenever possible.

Advocates are rarely satisfied by simply helping out, however. Instead, they aim to understand and address the root causes of suffering, inequality, and injustice. Creative and determined, Advocates are often able to come up with new insights and solutions, and their intuition and empathy help them understand people’s problems and influence them for the better.

Advocates can be very persuasive, sharing their vision and intentions through humane, sensitive, and relatable language. While they may not expect any tangible reward for their efforts, Advocates do tend to indulge in a little karmic satisfaction, hoping that the good turns they do for others will one day be returned.

Advocates must be cautious, however: they are susceptible to getting caught up in their causes, spreading themselves too thin, and burning out. Even when they’re hard at work, Advocates may experience a constant, nagging awareness that more needs to be done. They can become so engrossed in their activities that they neglect food and sleep to keep up with their obligations. Advocates may be more resistant to stress and emotional upheaval than many other personality types, but they’re still human, and they must learn to attend to their basic needs—both physical and emotional.

To avoid being overwhelmed, Advocates would do well to prioritize one or two worthy causes and just a few meaningful relationships. With their love of deep connections and soulful conversation, most Advocates naturally gravitate toward a small, tight-knit social circle. The anonymity of a crowd may appeal to them from time to time, but too much noise, chaos, or superficiality can drown out Advocates’ finer sensibilities.

This may all seem a little heavy, but Advocates would hardly have it any other way. Whatever circumstances, setbacks, or injustices they might face, they never forget their personal mission: connecting with others, doing the right thing, and making a difference.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Squirt and Gr8ful

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hmm, I got the Strategist.

Your personality type:

Strategist(VDI-C)



Nature
74% Visionary

Tactics
78% Diligent

Energy
84% Introverted



Identity

Challenging

Highly intelligent and thoroughly unconventional, Strategists might be known to the people around them as “bookworms” or “geeks.” Although they couldn’t care less about these labels, Strategists take pride in their reasoned, informed approach to life. By the time they become adults, the intellect they’ve cultivated since childhood puts them well ahead of most people in terms of knowledge, logic, and independent reasoning.

Strategists love the intellectual challenge of solving complex problems, and their formidable intellect sees the world in terms of its underlying systems. Incisive, diligent, and relentlessly analytical, Strategists strip away the superficial layers of whatever they study—from programming languages to works of art—in order to decipher the underlying laws, patterns, and assumptions. More than any other personality type, Strategists report losing themselves in their work for hours on end. The goal of this work isn’t simply to understand a given system, but rather to change and improve it.

Strategists love to innovate and challenge the status quo—a mission that can spark conflicts with people who value tradition and convention. Because Strategists prioritize logic and effectiveness, they have no respect for arguments that invoke bland truisms, rely on shaky reasoning, or appeal to sentiment. They’re equally unimpressed by seniority, titles, or social status, so they won’t pander or grant special consideration to people in positions of prestige.

When Strategists know they’re right, they pursue their points relentlessly, offering no concessions to those who disagree with them. To a Strategist, something is correct or it’s not; there is no middle ground. Their keen, independent minds won’t believe a story or explanation that they can’t verify themselves.

Strategists aren’t implacably stubborn, though. They are perfectly capable of admitting they don’t know the answers to specific problems, and they expect this transparency from other people as well. Strategists also don’t mind being proven wrong. They respect people who can test their intellect and make them see things differently. That said, Strategists are persuaded only by clear, rational arguments, calmly presented and thoughtfully defended.

The downside of a Strategist’s near-obsessive focus on rational thought is that it often fails to account for reality. Many people make decisions based on emotions or pleasure, and this seemingly illogical behavior—although perfectly natural—can shock or stymie Strategists. Particularly if it contradicts their advice or disrupts their well-laid plans, emotional decision-making can dismay Strategists. They may interpret other people’s normal behavior as stupidity, pig-headedness, or even incompetence. Unfortunately, this lack of understanding can create a chasm between Strategists and personality types that are more emotionally driven.

Ironically, Strategists’ stoicism and unflinching intellect tend to attract people who need direction and support—in other words, people who lack the visionary ambition that Strategists demand from others. As a result, Strategists may find themselves surrounded by people whom they consider clingy or dependent—two traits that are wholly unwelcome to fiercely independent Strategists.

Even Strategists’ closest friends are unlikely to find a shoulder to cry on. Strategists are uncomfortable with emotional outpourings, and when people turn to them for support, they often react by volleying back a list of logical solutions and recommendations. This impulse to fix problems rather than empathize has its drawbacks, especially in family life. Because of their drive to improve things—including their personal lives—Strategists risk becoming cold-blooded or unaccommodating in their relationships.

Strategists often take their efficiency and rationality for granted, assuming everyone else is the same way—or should be. Meanwhile, Strategists can overlook immensely powerful virtues like kindness, empathy, and compromise. In the chess game of life, Strategists may find that dismissing the unique skills of the other 31 personality types—even those they see as pawns—leaves them unable to defend the king.



Sent from my WAS-LX1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I got the Researcher, and it's really spot on.

 
Your personality type:
Researcher
(VDI-P)

Nature
68% Visionary
Tactics
81% Diligent
Energy
53% Introverted
Identity: Perfecting

Researchers are experts at cutting through the fluff to get to what matters. Intelligent, ambitious, perfectionistic, and rare, Researchers strive to improve whatever catches their interest—not to mention themselves. Researchers are success-driven, and when they decide to get something done, they push hard, with a quiet determination that has even their superiors taking notes.

Researchers prefer to process their thoughts internally rather than brainstorm aloud. They generally avoid the limelight, and in group settings, they won’t speak up until they’ve had a chance to thoroughly vet and consider their ideas. Given enough time, however, Researchers’ cautious yet incisive intellect can assess even the most confusing situations and produce a clear, navigable course of action. By the time a Researcher finally verbalizes a recommendation or idea, it tends to be unassailable.

Difficult projects and tight deadlines trigger significant stress for Researchers, but these tense situations can also bring out some of their best qualities. Inventive and curious, Researchers have sharp minds, and grand challenges tend to highlight their intelligence, radical creativity, and self-command. That said, Researchers are highly sensitive to criticism, and they fear the prospect of failure. If a team member lets them down or fails to live up to expectations during a time of stress, Researchers might lash out with a mercilessly harsh reaction.

Because they worry that others will let them down, Researchers strive to be jacks-of-all-trades. Unlike less organized Observant (O) types, however, Researchers are systematic, and they learn for the sake of control. In an attempt to ensure success, Researchers familiarize themselves with every last component of their projects. Their exacting standards, reluctance to trust fate, and unwillingness to delegate often produce a successful outcome.

These tendencies can also provoke anxiety and run Researchers ragged, however. Researchers are perfectionists, and they push themselves hard to meet their own highest standards—sometimes too hard. For their health, balance, and wellbeing, it’s important for Researchers to loosen their grip and acknowledge their own limitations. Not everything can be predicted or changed or controlled—nor should it be.

Researchers are highly intuitive and original, and beneath their reserved, stoical exterior lies a quirky sense of humor. Thanks to their ability to make connections between seemingly unrelated things, they come out with unexpected and often hilarious insights. It can take some time to navigate beyond a Researcher’s serious exterior, but for those who appreciate a cutting wit, it’s well worth the effort.

Researchers’ humor, competence, and seeming confidence protect their greatest secret: beneath it all, they are plagued by emotional turbulence and self-doubt. Their controlling, perfectionistic approach to life may often bring them success, but they’re haunted by their past failures. It is difficult for them to maintain an attitude of exploration, play, or daring in the face of such an intense fear of failure and criticism.

Researchers may also have difficulties with emotional intelligence. Of all personality types, they are the most likely to say that other people’s emotions confuse them. Because people are motivated by a complex mix of thoughts, beliefs, and feelings, they rarely behave as rationally as Researchers would like. Dramatic outbursts, inexplicable preferences, and snap decisions are all common enough emotional responses, but Researchers struggle to understand this type of behavior in others. They may even become suspicious of someone’s kindness or assistance if they don’t see a reason for it.

Researchers’ acute sensitivity does have its upsides, fortunately. It spurs them to grow into better people, deliver on their commitments, and connect on a deep level with their values and priorities. It also balances Researchers’ innate ambition with introspection and reflection, providing them with a deeper sense of motivation than many other personality types experience. Because they expect so much from themselves and from life, Researchers are unlikely to settle for anything less than a meaningful, satisfying, purpose-driven existence—and for them, such a life is well worth the turmoil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,378 Posts


Researcher (VDI-P)

 
Nature: 78% Visionary
Tactics: 71% Diligent
Energy: 70% Introverted
Identity: Perfecting


with a quiet determination
Deploying obligatory Undertale reference in 3, 2, 1, mark.



that has even their superiors taking notes.
That doesn't seem quite accurate.

Researchers prefer to process their thoughts internally rather than brainstorm aloud.
Most of the time, sure. Other times, brainstorming with others is necessary and even fun. We sometimes need to remind ourselves that we're not required to be "islands." That's too much of a burden.

They generally avoid the limelight, and in group settings, they won’t speak up until they’ve had a chance to thoroughly vet and consider their ideas.
Fact. The reason for this is because we don't like to misinform others.

By the time a Researcher finally verbalizes a recommendation or idea, it tends to be unassailable.
One of the benefits of prioritizing order over speed.

Researchers are highly sensitive to criticism, and they fear the prospect of failure.
Hence the stereotype of us being hyper-neurotic nutbags. My grandpa suffered from dyslexia (hereditary) and PTSD (result of the Korean War) and neither of those stopped him from becoming a brilliant engineer.

Researchers strive to be jacks-of-all-trades.
Some of us fall into that paradigm without trying. Others find a singular aptitude and master it.

Researchers are systematic
The only way to establish and maintain ergonomic order...because Lawful Good is Lawful GREAT!

they learn for the sake of control.
Okay, okay. So maybe we are control freaks.

Their exacting standards
Must...resist...urge to deploy...another Undertale reference!

reluctance to trust fate
Deploying T2 reference in 3, 2, 1, mark.



...unwillingness to delegate often produce a successful outcome.
No one is an island. We need to remind ourselves of that.

These tendencies can also provoke anxiety and run Researchers ragged.
Refer back to stereotype of hyper-neurotic nutbag. Deploying Archer reference in 3, 2, 1, mark.


Note: Disregard everything except the phrase, "Stereotypes exist for a reason."

For their health, balance, and well-being, it’s important for Researchers to loosen their grip and acknowledge their own limitations.
Deploying Magnum Force reference in 3, 2, 1, mark.



Not everything can be predicted or changed or controlled—nor should it be.
Fact. Some degree of chaos is beneficial because it prevents stagnation.

Researchers are highly intuitive and original, and beneath their reserved exterior lies a quirky sense of humor.
The upside to being a hyper-neurotic nutbag. Neo-dadaist gonzo absurdism, hooo! (You have to imagine me saying that in the voice of Sir Hammerlock from Borderlands 2.)

Thanks to their ability to make connections between seemingly unrelated things
One of the reasons why people call me a "space case" all the time. It's the dreamy nature of intuition.

they come out with unexpected and often hilarious insights.
As often as I get called a "space case," I do get complimented on my insight.

a Researcher’s serious exterior
Dana Barrett: "You know, you don't act like a scientist."
Peter Venkman: "They're usually pretty stiff."
Dana Barrett: "You're more like a gameshow host."

they are plagued by emotional turbulence and self-doubt.
That's part of the package. You can't have superpowers without weaknesses. That just doesn't fly. Remember that episode of 'Doug' where Doug was getting on Skeeter's case because Silver Skeeter was too powerful, whereas Quailman was more "realistic" (for lack of a better term)?

haunted by their past failures.
We're like every character from every Cronenberg movie ever. Long live the new flesh!

It is difficult for them to maintain an attitude of exploration, play, or daring in the face of such an intense fear of failure and criticism.
Fact. But it's so worth the effort.

Researchers may also have difficulties with emotional intelligence. Of all personality types, they are the most likely to say that other people’s emotions confuse them. Because people are motivated by a complex mix of thoughts, beliefs, and feelings, they rarely behave as rationally as Researchers would like.
Speaking for myself here, but I don't have a problem with people being people. What irks me is when they afflict each other with hubris and/or hypocrisy. For example, they'll demand orderliness and perfection, but at the same time, they'll demand that things be done quickly. You can't have it both ways. Perfection takes time and planning. This is especially true in the workplace (the primary source of misery for most people). The modern-day workplace prioritizes speed over order but also demands perfection. It's a contradictory paradigm that needs to be drastically realigned. People need to have consistent and clearly defined responsibilities. When their responsibilities are ambiguous or are left vaguely defined, exploitation takes hold. This typically takes the form of workers being forced to do multiple jobs for a single paycheck. Or to paraphrase Gordon Freeman as per Freeman's Mind, "...what they really mean is they expect you do 50 things PLUS that one thing." I wish I could remember that whole quote verbatim.

Researchers struggle to understand this type of behavior in others.
To quote Johnny Five, "Humans are so ple-comp-cated."

They may even become suspicious of someone’s kindness or assistance if they don’t see a reason for it.
That's something I've never struggled with. That just seems weird to me. Any degree of kindness or assistance makes me feel all tingly inside, not suspicious. Some of us take that "asocial" stereotype too far.

Researchers’ acute sensitivity does have its upsides
It's why a lot of us are foodies. XD

introspection and reflection
Except when some people accuse us of being selfish for that quality. Seriously, can you believe that some people are so inured with such a collectivist belief system that they regard introspection as selfish? No wonder we're living in the world of Idiocracy.

Because they expect so much from themselves and from life, Researchers are unlikely to settle for anything less than a meaningful, satisfying, purpose-driven existence—and for them, such a life is well worth the turmoil.
Word to your motherboard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
I got Advocate. It doesn't really fit. I have no trouble saying no to worthy causes, and the following paragraph doesn't describe me at all. It does, however, apply quite well to my ENFJ husband:

Advocates must be cautious, however: they are susceptible to getting caught up in their causes, spreading themselves too thin, and burning out. Even when they’re hard at work, Advocates may experience a constant, nagging awareness that more needs to be done. They can become so engrossed in their activities that they neglect food and sleep to keep up with their obligations. Advocates may be more resistant to stress and emotional upheaval than many other personality types, but they’re still human, and they must learn to attend to their basic needs—both physical and emotional.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Your personality type:
Strategist
(VDI-C)

Nature
66% Visionary

Tactics
78% Diligent

Energy
72% Introverted

Identity
Challenging

Highly intelligent and thoroughly unconventional, Strategists might be known to the people around them as “bookworms” or “geeks.” Although they couldn’t care less about these labels, Strategists take pride in their reasoned, informed approach to life. By the time they become adults, the intellect they’ve cultivated since childhood puts them well ahead of most people in terms of knowledge, logic, and independent reasoning.

Strategists love the intellectual challenge of solving complex problems, and their formidable intellect sees the world in terms of its underlying systems. Incisive, diligent, and relentlessly analytical, Strategists strip away the superficial layers of whatever they study—from programming languages to works of art—in order to decipher the underlying laws, patterns, and assumptions. More than any other personality type, Strategists report losing themselves in their work for hours on end. The goal of this work isn’t simply to understand a given system, but rather to change and improve it.

Strategists love to innovate and challenge the status quo—a mission that can spark conflicts with people who value tradition and convention. Because Strategists prioritize logic and effectiveness, they have no respect for arguments that invoke bland truisms, rely on shaky reasoning, or appeal to sentiment. They’re equally unimpressed by seniority, titles, or social status, so they won’t pander or grant special consideration to people in positions of prestige.

When Strategists know they’re right, they pursue their points relentlessly, offering no concessions to those who disagree with them. To a Strategist, something is correct or it’s not; there is no middle ground. Their keen, independent minds won’t believe a story or explanation that they can’t verify themselves.

Strategists aren’t implacably stubborn, though. They are perfectly capable of admitting they don’t know the answers to specific problems, and they expect this transparency from other people as well. Strategists also don’t mind being proven wrong. They respect people who can test their intellect and make them see things differently. That said, Strategists are persuaded only by clear, rational arguments, calmly presented and thoughtfully defended.

The downside of a Strategist’s near-obsessive focus on rational thought is that it often fails to account for reality. Many people make decisions based on emotions or pleasure, and this seemingly illogical behavior—although perfectly natural—can shock or stymie Strategists. Particularly if it contradicts their advice or disrupts their well-laid plans, emotional decision-making can dismay Strategists. They may interpret other people’s normal behavior as stupidity, pig-headedness, or even incompetence. Unfortunately, this lack of understanding can create a chasm between Strategists and personality types that are more emotionally driven.

Ironically, Strategists’ stoicism and unflinching intellect tend to attract people who need direction and support—in other words, people who lack the visionary ambition that Strategists demand from others. As a result, Strategists may find themselves surrounded by people whom they consider clingy or dependent—two traits that are wholly unwelcome to fiercely independent Strategists.

Even Strategists’ closest friends are unlikely to find a shoulder to cry on. Strategists are uncomfortable with emotional outpourings, and when people turn to them for support, they often react by volleying back a list of logical solutions and recommendations. This impulse to fix problems rather than empathize has its drawbacks, especially in family life. Because of their drive to improve things—including their personal lives—Strategists risk becoming cold-blooded or unaccommodating in their relationships.

Strategists often take their efficiency and rationality for granted, assuming everyone else is the same way—or should be. Meanwhile, Strategists can overlook immensely powerful virtues like kindness, empathy, and compromise. In the chess game of life, Strategists may find that dismissing the unique skills of the other 31 personality types—even those they see as pawns—leaves them unable to defend the king.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
767 Posts
Commander
(VDE-C)

I guess it fits. Not the most accurate description though.

 
"Logical and outspoken, Commanders are famed for their ability to lead and manage others. They love a good challenge, and they’re more confident in their abilities than any other personality type. Commanders can be intimidating, given their strict rationalism and unyielding focus, and they’re hardly known for their gentle warmth. That said, they are able to galvanize people and achieve great things, thanks to their sheer force of will and their conviction that nothing is impossible if they just try hard enough.

Stable, intelligent, and charismatic, Commanders have a balanced center of gravity that draws people to them. Commanders have enough interpersonal skills to get what they want, and their goals have a way of becoming everyone’s goals. The result is that Commanders’ plans and determinations often turn into self-fulfilling prophecies.

Commanders can be chillingly ruthless in pursuing their aims, which may lead them to dismiss other people’s opinions, feelings, or best interests. That said, Commanders tend not to burn important bridges, and they’re too rational to be vindictive. People with this personality type may not always be agreeable, but they can’t be accused of shortsightedness or pettiness.

Brilliant entrepreneurs and debaters, Commanders are a force to be reckoned with when it comes to business and negotiations. They advance their points with great conviction, emphasizing the unshakeable logic and superior efficacy of their argument. Commanders risk alienating themselves if they appear domineering, but they usually have the foresight and self-control to avoid such issues. In many cases, their opposition may end up agreeing or just giving up.

Commanders’ stability and confidence tend to attract people who need support, advice, and reassurance—much to Commanders’ chagrin. After all, empathy and sensitivity are not among their strengths. Commanders believe in “survival of the fittest,” and they respect forceful, independent thinkers. As a result, they have little patience for people they see as needy, lazy, or incompetent.

Fortunately, Commanders have no trouble recognizing others’ talents and strengths, and they give credit when it’s due. Even though Commanders couldn’t care less about sensitivity or diplomacy, they understand that their success rides on the ability and willingness of others to work with them. This combination of high standards and interpersonal pragmatism is what makes Commanders so effective at managing organizations.

This description might make Commanders sound dour or joyless, but the truth is that they enjoy interacting with others. In their own way, Commanders even take pleasure in helping friends with their shortcomings—although this help may be accompanied by some uncomfortably accurate teasing. Commanders have a great time getting together with friends and colleagues, as long as their company is fairly thick-skinned. Even when Commanders do misspeak or come across too strong, their energy and charisma have a way of smoothing over their social missteps and carrying them through to another victory."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
601 Posts
The first result I got was VDI-M (Adovocate), but it is not an agreeable result as I cannot agree with it's description. Retaking the test the result claimed I was a VDI-P, to which I am in agreement a lot more. However VDI-C is also a rather close description.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sippingcappucino

·
Registered
ENTJ; 8w7; Persian C
Joined
·
9,469 Posts
Just the opposition / tying into my "core/main fears" http://personalitycafe.com/intj-forum-scientists/298922-what-do-you-fear.html -- And nothing pleases myself more than utilizing my skills / knowledge in an realistically applicable manner & to not just to "contribute" my input, but make things better / improved in the process. Otherwise, I see no point in many things -- such as existence, itself. There is no point "being smart,"; if it is never used in a useful manner.


And a taste of healthy 5;

 


Type Five in Brief

Fives are alert, insightful, and curious. They are able to concentrate and focus on developing complex ideas and skills. Independent, innovative, and inventive, they can also become preoccupied with their thoughts and imaginary constructs. They become detached, yet high-strung and intense.

They typically have problems with eccentricity, nihilism, and isolation.

At their Best: Visionary pioneers, often ahead of their time, and able to see the world in an entirely new way.

Basic Fear: Being useless, helpless, or incapable
Basic Desire: To be capable and competent

Key Motivations: Want to possess knowledge, to understand the environment, to have everything figured out as a way of defending the self from threats from the environment.

The Meaning of the Arrows (in brief)

However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), avaricious, detached Fives become more self-confident and decisive, like healthy Eights. Learn more about the arrows.


___________

Leader (VDE-M)

Nature
Visionary
67%

Tactics
63%
Diligent

Energy
56% Introverted

Identity
Motivating

Galvanized by the concepts of bravery and purpose, Leaders believe it is nothing short of destiny that they rise to be a force of good in the world. Thanks to their rare combination of idealism, logic, and determination and their willingness to actually go out and engage with the world, Leaders are among the most influential personality types.

Because they set their sights on such grand achievements, Leaders may need more time than most other personality types to explore their relationships, feelings, and ideas before moving into their particular niche. Leaders can create long-term visions for the future easily enough, but what trips them up is figuring out a day-to-day path in the direction of their dreams. But once Leaders identify a course and set their hearts and minds on it, they stop at nothing to achieve it. In fact, they report feeling motivated more often than any other personality type.

As with all Visionary (V) types, Leaders’ accomplishments stem from a deep motivation to strive for something better, to become more than they were yesterday. Other people may see buying a house or landing a good job as goals in and of themselves, but for a Leader these outward milestones are only meaningful if they reflect inward progress, and they must serve as a means for accomplishing more. Each success is simply a stepping stone to greater success, further personal development, and broader impact.

Leaders get particular satisfaction from helping other people sort out their problems and achieve their dreams. They strive to pull others out of their comfort zones and onto a path of growth and exploration. This may be too much for some people, however. Confident and visionary, Leaders can get so emotionally caught up in their ideas and optimism that they don’t realize they’re pushing too hard. It’s important for Leaders to step back and reflect on whether their efforts to change other people are truly welcome, needed, or helpful.

When they take the time to do this, Leaders can balance their eloquence, passion, and strong will with an intuitive sensitivity, kindness, and sense of calm. This balance is what enables Leaders to shine in a leadership capacity, respecting others’ limits while encouraging their dreams. Inspiring and emotionally stable, Leaders serve as beacons for those who want to do more but don’t yet know how.

Leaders excel at interacting with people of all types, using just the right words and body language to forge deep, fruitful connections. They intuitively grasp how to motivate people, offer reassurance, and recognize and express feelings. When combined with their seemingly limitless imaginations, this interpersonal intelligence enables Leaders to produce incredible results wherever they apply themselves.

Leaders aren’t motivated by power or glory, though. Instead, they are guided by something deeper than material success: the desire to make an impact. This trait makes them inspiring speakers and leaders, although they can be somewhat intimidating. Able to speak with conviction and authority on subjects of human importance, Leaders have the potential to spark entire movements. That said, they also have the grace and humility to acknowledge that their power doesn’t come solely from themselves, but rather from the fact that they stand taller in the presence of others.
 

·
Delphic Seer
Joined
·
18,076 Posts
Strategist (VDI-C).
 
  • Like
Reactions: sippingcappucino

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
This is (exactly?) a MBTI test with the assertive & turbulent subtypes (with nice pictures of animals and birds added to it).
If you read the descriptions you will notice that:
V= INtuitive, R=Sensing,
D=J, O=P
I=I, E=E

So:
Creators
VDI-*
Visionary, Diligent, Introverted
= INJ

Directors
VDE-*
Visionary, Diligent, Extraverted
= ENJ

Seekers
VOI-*
Visionary, Observant, Introverted
= INP

Catalysts
VOE-*
Visionary, Observant, Extraverted
= ENP

Protectors
RDI-*
Realistic, Diligent, Introverted
= ISJ

Organizers
RDE-*
Realistic, Diligent, Extraverted
= ESJ

Explorers
ROI-*
Realistic, Observant, Introverted
= ISP

Communicators
ROE-*
Realistic, Observant, Extraverted
= ESP

I only read the 4 descriptions for the VDI subtypes and the general descriptions for what V,R, O,D, I&E mean, so I could be wrong, but I don't think so.

I found that VDI-P - researcher is correspondent to the INTJ-T and VDI-C - strategist to INTJ-A; VDI-S - reformer to INFJ-T and VDI-M - advocate to INFJ-A.
I think the rest of the subtypes mean the same (example: VOI-M-mediator & -S-peacemaker = the T & A subtypes of INFP and VOI-C-engineer & -P-scientist = the T & A subtypes of INTP; you do the rest of the correlations.)

I don't know if I'm INTJ or INFP, but I always test INTJ in free online tests and I got rather high results on the Turbulent scale in tests that also have T vs A, and in this test I got:
VDI-P - researcher
Nature
84%
Visionary

Tactics
74%
Diligent

Energy
91%
Introverted

Identity
Perfecting

so, yeah, INTJ-T as usual.
And the description fits me really well. But so does the INTJ-T one.

I think this is a good test, but a little unnecessarily overcomplicated by having letters that overlap and are easier to confuse you than the MBTI+T or A: for example, VDI-S (from supporting) is named Reformer, but there is a VDI Strategist, which, no, it's not VDI-S, it's VDI-C (from challenging). Or maybe it's just me, I'm used to simple, logical T=Thinking, F= Feeling, -T=Turbulent, -A=Assertive and so on and I don't like to be bothered with fancy titles. I know what they wanted to do, to give each subtype a name of its own, but it would have been simpler to leave it just the code of letters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I found that VDI-P - researcher is correspondent to the INTJ-T and VDI-C - strategist to INTJ-A; VDI-S - reformer to INFJ-T and VDI-M - advocate to INFJ-A.

Actually, that makes a lot of sense, and by this reasoning my score of VDI-P would be INTJ-T, which is actually what I am. No wonder it seemed pretty spot on?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
601 Posts
Actually, that makes a lot of sense, and by this reasoning my score of VDI-P would be INTJ-T, which is actually what I am. No wonder it seemed pretty spot on?
You would be correct. Being a Turbulent INTJ myself, I found this description described myself rather aptly. And in truth, I do prefer the challenging/protectionist/advocate/(insert what S means here) rather than the T/A dichotomies found by Myers-Briggs.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top