Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 63 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As an "African-american" (I hate using that term, but that's too long to go into now), I have always noticed the rampant disdain, no, hate of independent thought and intellectual pursuits. Personally, I have been rebuked on numerous occasions for my offenses such as: playing tennis (" that's a white sport"), renouncing organized religion, and most laughably, for speaking and using proper English (talking "white"; I'm sorry, but "axe" != "ask"). Growing up this was a huge blow to my self-esteem, but now I see it for what it is: anti-intellectualism in the black community.

My girlfriend and I had a long talk on the subject, ranging from how I couldn't take hip-hop as a genre seriously until I was 13 (when I found artists that really were masters of the art form and who rapped about things that mattered), to how "we" are doing little to change the popular perception of the race (see: Tyler Perry's œuvre; we actually discussed the possibility that maybe he is fully aware of his movie's effect, and, with the money that consumers/TBS throw at him, that he is laughing his way to the bank), and how if black America hadn't been so easily swayed by race, Obama might not be in office (not anything against him; I have no opinion yet on his tenure as the head-of-state).

Anyone else notice this, or am I way off the mark?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
As an "African-american" (I hate using that term, but that's too long to go into now), I have always noticed the rampant disdain, no, hate of independent thought and intellectual pursuits. Personally, I have been rebuked on numerous occasions for my offenses such as: playing tennis (" that's a white sport"), renouncing organized religion, and most laughably, for speaking and using proper English (talking "white"; I'm sorry, but "axe" != "ask"). Growing up this was a huge blow to my self-esteem, but now I see it for what it is: anti-intellectualism in the black community.

My girlfriend and I had a long talk on the subject, ranging from how I couldn't take hip-hop as a genre seriously until I was 13 (when I found artists that really were masters of the art form and who rapped about things that mattered), to how "we" are doing little to change the popular perception of the race (see: Tyler Perry's œuvre; we actually discussed the possibility that maybe he is fully aware of his movie's effect, and, with the money that consumers/TBS throw at him, that he is laughing his way to the bank), and how if black America hadn't been so easily swayed by race, Obama might not be in office (not anything against him; I have no opinion yet on his tenure as the head-of-state).

Anyone else notice this, or am I way off the mark?
That's exactly how I feel...
I think most blacks still feel as if they are victims, victimized by society and circumstances they had before. It's like a lot of us say "Well I had to go through this and this so I'm gonna act like this because I'm angry because my people say it's alright" Not to mention the pressure from fellow blacks. The thing is though, we aren't really victims anymore. Yea a lot of us still get stuck with shitty circumstances, but the resources are out there to help us out. We can go out and get a job and go to college just like the next person and we don't gotta worry that we won't get this or that because of our race. We can choose our own paths now, we're free. Maybe racism and all that isn't gone 100%, but I'd say at least a good 90%.

Then though, a lot of our people are still stuck in endless cycles of hate, and it is hard to break those cycles especially when it's the whole family and community. It's hard for a black kid to have grown up with horrible circumstances to realize that he isn't what his past is and who he knows, but can choose his own life for himself. I got hope though eventually anti-intellectualism will just be a thing in the past, another hurdle blacks will have faced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
Growing up (East side of Cleveland) those who were black but did not talk in a ghetto accent were often berated. Hell, I was white and people wondered why I didn't talk "ghetto".. but that wasn't the point. The girl was also berated for going to college, as if she was "selling" out. Growing up, it also didn't help to see rap music set people's priorities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Growing up (East side of Cleveland) those who were black but did not talk in a ghetto accent were often berated. Hell, I was white and people wondered why I didn't talk "ghetto".. but that wasn't the point. The girl was also berated for going to college, as if she was "selling" out. Growing up, it also didn't help to see rap music set people's priorities.
What makes the black accent "ghetto"? Is the white accent the "proper" way to verbalize English? I have an accent, I suppress it's heaviness now and then so people can understand me better who don't have it, but it's not like I have it because I want to, it's just how I am... just like the way you talk is just how you are.

Sorry, but I just hate the fact the word ghetto is grouped with black in America so much... it bothers me. Although it only proves the topic more...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Another problem of mine: all my life growing up I'd been brainwashed (maybe too strong a term) by my mother telling me that I'd "have it harder" and that "when people look at [me], all they see is a colour." I realize that racism is still present in American society, but it's not as rampant as people'd like to think. However, my mother never seemed to acknowledge the fact that I am of mixed race, and that I am not "black". Everyone on the black side of my family always chided me for "listening to white music," and tried to find black role models for me to look up to. My mother was and still is mad at me for turning down a "Historically Black College".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
What makes the black accent "ghetto"? Is the white accent the "proper" way to verbalize English? I have an accent, I suppress it's heaviness now and then so people can understand me better who don't have it, but it's not like I have it because I want to, it's just how I am... just like the way you talk is just how you are.

Sorry, but I just hate the fact the word ghetto is grouped with black in America so much... it bothers me. Although it only proves the topic more...
It's how people in the ghetto talked. I use the environment instead of the race because that's how language works. If the labels are truly offending, make up some that don't offend you and I'll use them if they work.
Also, while growing up in Cleveland lead people to believe it was only black and white.. it's not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Like One of the Black Stars said 'I'm a victim of Four Hundred years of conditioning, even my conditioning has been conditioned'

This issue doesnt begin and end with 'African Americans' it's in every Human society. Humans are prone to imitate.
Besides I don't think you guys are being fair. Things like this only reinforce the stereotypes 'African Americans' have.

I may not fully understand the deal with you guys, but I think its time for you guys who have 'opened eyes' to just carry on. How would things ever change if you keep segregating yourselves also. I never knew 'African Americans' were a race btw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
It's how people in the ghetto talked. I use the environment instead of the race because that's how language works. If the labels are truly offending, make up some that don't offend you and I'll use them if they work.
Also, while growing up in Cleveland lead people to believe it was only black and white.. it's not.
I think you mean... how they act moreso than talk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
No. It's linguistics. I haven't really thought about behavior outside my "rap music setting priorities" comment.
I don't know much about linguistics, but try telling an educated black man he has a ghetto accent and see how he responds. It wasn't the ghetto that formed the accent, it was everyone else. If you can understand that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Like One of the Black Stars said 'I'm a victim of Four Hundred years of conditioning, even my conditioning has been conditioned'

This issue does begin and end with 'African Americans' it's in every Human society. Humans are prone to imitate.
Besides I don't think you guys are being fair. Things like this only reinforce the stereotypes 'African Americans' have.

I may not fully understand the deal with you guys, but I think its time for you guys who have 'opened eyes' to just carry on. How would things ever change if you keep segregating yourselves also. I never knew 'African Americans' were a race btw


Race is a social construct used by those in power to manipulate and separate groups of people for greater control. As you can see, it is working quite well, as it has been since 1676 (Bacon's Rebellion, when the fears of middle class and slave uprisings were realized). Race only exists because we allow it to exist, and unfortunately it will continue on existing until people are educated in the matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
I don't know much about linguistics, but try telling an educated black man he has a ghetto accent and see how he responds. It wasn't the ghetto that formed the accent, it was everyone else. If you can understand that...
I don't think he's talking about an actual accent, but more so the colloquialisms and idioms that those within the community use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
I don't know much about linguistics, but try telling an educated black man he has a ghetto accent and see how he responds. It wasn't the ghetto that formed the accent, it was everyone else. If you can understand that...
Bah, just tell me the PC term so I can save myself this hassle in the future.

me said:
It's how people in the ghetto talked. I use the environment instead of the race because that's how language works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Race is a social construct used by those in power to manipulate and separate groups of people for greater control. As you can see, it is working quite well, as it has been since 1676 (Bacon's Rebellion, when the fears of middle class and slave uprisings were realized). Race only exists because we allow it to exist, and unfortunately it will continue on existing until people are educated in the matter.
Totally agree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I got into this subject a bit at university. One of the books I read described a theory that blacks see the system as something that was created without their interests in mind (it was). Most did not want to join the system and devalue the one thing that they had owned themselves which is black culture and to an extent blackness itself. Therefore, many blacks still feel as though they should reject american "wihite" cultural values because even if they began to assimilate, they would always be subordinates within it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Race is a social construct used by those in power to manipulate and separate groups of people for greater control. As you can see, it is working quite well, as it has been since 1676 (Bacon's Rebellion, when the fears of middle class and slave uprisings were realized). Race only exists because we allow it to exist, and unfortunately it will continue on existing until people are educated in the matter.
This may sound good but it doesn't help the situation to say this. In reality, this is very misleading. The fact is, all peoples, beginning with very young children, acknowledge the differences between themselves and others. All peoples make automatic associations and judgement based on the color of skin. With mass media telling us what stereotypes to familiarize with a certain color or race, though, this innate human behavior is easily manipulated. I think the movie Crash (2004) really did a nice job getting into this.

We cannot just decide intellectually that race doesn't exist or that the government invented it. There are many many psychological studies that will tell you otherwise.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
Like One of the Black Stars said 'I'm a victim of Four Hundred years of conditioning, even my conditioning has been conditioned'

This issue does begin and end with 'African Americans' it's in every Human society. Humans are prone to imitate.
Besides I don't think you guys are being fair. Things like this only reinforce the stereotypes 'African Americans' have.

I may not fully understand the deal with you guys, but I think its time for you guys who have 'opened eyes' to just carry on. How would things ever change if you keep segregating yourselves also. I never knew 'African Americans' were a race btw
I didn't think you were old enough to know who blackstar is.
@op
You might consider that maybe those who look down on you have something of a point.

There is much to be learned from your culture if you're willing to study it and accept it for it's practical value.

What do these songs say to you?


Don't lose track of your culture.
Learn humility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I'm not forsaking "my culture". I fucking love hip-hop.

dead prez aren't the best to quote:

dead prez, "They Schools":
They schools can't teach us shit
My people need freedom, we tryin to get all we can get
All my high school teachers can suck my dick
Tellin me white man lies straight bullshit
But I'm all about Mos Def.

Mos Def, "Mathematics":
Stiffer stipulations attached to each sentence
Budget cutbacks but increased police presence
And even if you get out of prison still livin
join the other five million under state supervision
This is business, no faces just lines and statistics
from your phone, your zip code, to S-S-I digits
The system break man child and women into figures
Two columns for who is, and who ain't ******
Numbers is hardly real and they never have feelings
but you push too hard, even numbers got limits
Why did one straw break the camel's back? Here's the secret:
the million other straws underneath it - it's all mathematics
Or some Nas.

Nas, "One Love":
Sometimes I sit back with a Buddha sack
Mind's in another world thinking how can we exist through the facts
Written in school text books, bibles, et cetera
Fuck a school lecture, the lies get me vexed-er
The thread is not about hip-hop.
 
  • Like
Reactions: feefafo
1 - 20 of 63 Posts
Top