Personality Cafe banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When I was at my worst with anxiety and depression I would often feel chest pains, constant urges to urinate, and headaches. I would also become extremely nauseated and have troubles breathing. Has anyone else here dealt with the physical symptoms of this disease, and how did you handle it? Looking back I realize I didn’t deal with these symptoms very well and allowed them to control my life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
It may be the stress. You should probably go to a pychiatrist and have them prescribe you something? Maybe a placebo would help. Probably stress!! Take a nice nap under a tree and see it if helps :wink:
Oh btw, I had that chest pain before when I was dealing with some crap in my life that I wasn't ready to handle. Hope it helps!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teigue

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I was hopeful that my body would faithfully reflect how I felt inside - for better or worse.
I find it in myself, but the issue is that I become unaware of its effect. For example, halting breath would lead me to not talking at all - just freezing up.
I think for INFPs it is because we do not deal well with conflict. We really don't mind the other person's differences when they do care (perhaps). Just an overall unawareness toward it?

I'd suggest going back to the basics, like reteaching yourself to breath.
Depends on if the anxiety comes along when you are with other people or alone. Even though one affects the other.
I realized with people that I tend to zone in on them so much that I forget what I was doing with myself.
I don't really know the one answer... Just suggestions.
But when any conflictions arise, the first step is to find or maintain a sense of peace - or you may not find any answer at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
I've been through both anxiety and depression, but not on levels like yours. Try to find something that you can do that you KNOW makes you happy. If it still persists after awhile, I would go and see a psychiatrist like somethingami mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,347 Posts
A girl I dated had similar problems. I swear, it was to the point where I was at the hospital with her at least once a week.

Anyways, as mentioned already, you may want to look into prescription pick me ups for depression. Namely medicine containing serotonin. Often in many cases it's a lack of that which may cause depression -- which often contributes to anxiety.

Now it's not about taking some drug and everything being fixed, we all know that. You want to ensure you have a proper support system keeping an eye on you as well as making positive changes in your life (eat better? maybe exercise? get into sleep & wakeup routines).

With all that in mind, I have faith you can overcome it, just try not to sit on your hands.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teigue

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
Those changes could help. I haven't dealt with quite a nasty set of symptoms like that. It could have a specific medical cause. For example, sometimes anxiety can be physiological. It's important to see a doctor for a thorough examination.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teigue

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
Have you ever seen garden state? When I saw that movie I was like is that why I get those headache pains that feel like a lightening bolt? I used to always get them and still do sometimes.It was weird seeing that I still wonder like,if it was a real thing....

I also get horrible rib pains bad enough to where I cry from the pain,that have no explanation.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
If the rib pain is triggered by movement, I have some guesses....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teigue

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
I just returned from the bathroom, my head aches, and I had problems breathing since yesterday because of chest pains. <.<
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teigue

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
I don't think what I've gone through would ever be called depression but when I'm stressed yea it does manifest itself in the body.. My complexion looks uneven, skin is oily, I have a hard time digesting food properly. The darkest times in my life so far occurred when high school ended, and I ended up being diagnosed with a chronic sort of illness.. which I have to take care of now. A lot of it has to do with diet.. I eat a lot of food 'pure' like raw vegetables, along with some meat for protein. I don't do well with starches as it's too much work to digest (bread, sometimes potato). Recently my sister has also got it, but she is unable to have beef.. so it changes from person to person. You just learn to become sensitive to your body... the way it reacts to food, to stimuli, to life, environment. And in time you'll know when you need to change accordingly. Exercise, rest, inspiration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Talk to someone about it. My problems didn't come to the surface until I was 23 and my mother died. Then I just spun out of control. I still have trouble with anxiety and depression once in awhile, but more so anxiety. If you haven't already done so, don't take in any caffeine or alcohol. It'll just mess you up more. I used to combat my anxiety with alcohol, but now 23 to 26 is one big blur with sober days of waking up in my own urine, vomit, etc - definitely not cool!
A clinical psychologist recommended The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edmund Bourne. It helped me a lot. Another one recommended by a different clinical psychologist was Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David Burns. It helped me too, but not as much as the Anxiety and Phobia workbook.
If you're in high school, college or university go to your student services counselling department and speak to a counsellor or clinical psychologist. Anxiety has been more my problem with only slight bouts of depression. Best thing though, is to speak to either a clinical psychologist or a psychiatrist. If you've already been diagnosed as having a mental disorder like bipolar depression or generalized anxiety disorder, then a plan of coping should've already been laid out to you. If you've never been diagnosed, I'd see the clinical psychologist first. Sometimes, issues like anxiety and depression can be dealt with without the use of drugs, but sometimes drugs are needed in conjunction with behaviour modification techniques. Studies have shown that some people with OCD have had their brain chemistry revert to a normal person's brain chemistry simply through behaviour modification techniques without the use of pschiatric medication. But everyone's different, Oh, and exercise if you can. Try to burn off some of the excess adrenaline that's just floating around in your body - walk, run, weights, whatever. Even the endorphins released during exercise will help to elevate your mood. A note on therapists: MAKE SURE that you see either a clinical psychologist or a psychiatrist. Some therapists/counsellors will just be Masters of Educational Psychology or some other branch, with only half the training of a psychiatrist or clinical psychologist.

p.s. keeping a journal is another thing I've found to be useful. It allows you to objectify your mental issues. Studies have shown that after writing about a troubling topic, patients will feel slightly worse immediately after in the short term, but feel better about it several weeks to months later.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top