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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm wondering if anyone has taken or knows of a variety of martial arts. I'm looking at taking a class sometime in the future to learn self-defense and perhaps learn some philosophy as well behind the art that might change my perspective on things. What sorts of martial arts do you take and what type might you suggest I look into? I'm open to whatever as long as the emphasis is on using the arms, hands and/or legs and feet.
 

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So I'm wondering if anyone has taken or knows of a variety of martial arts. I'm looking at taking a class sometime in the future to learn self-defense and perhaps learn some philosophy as well behind the art that might change my perspective on things. What sorts of martial arts do you take and what type might you suggest I look into? I'm open to whatever as long as the emphasis is on using the arms, hands and/or legs and feet.
I took gracie juijitsu. There are no life philosophies like traditional East Asian arts, but the art itself, based on economy of motion and momentum, can indeed be applied as analogies for life (push, pull, flow, etc).

I see it more useful for street fights than actual self defense situations in which the main goal is to break contact and escape. BJj style is a “sticky” art in which you want to close the distance between yourself and your opponent. Needless to say, this is not really conducive to escape. The art asks that you get even more committed to contact.

Overall, I really enjoyed doing it and it does give you a huge advantage over your average club shit talker. Also, the speed at which the drills get your body into shape is akin to doing yoga on crack.

However, if you are looking for practical AND spiritual, I’d say check out kyokushin karate or traditional Japanese jujitsu since they do live sparring as well as promote traditional thought. The downside here is that it will most likely take you years to become proficient. It’s a give a take.
 

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Thing is .. Martial arts does not equal Self defense. Knowing a bunch of Martial arts moves will not save your ass in a streetfight. It will be helpful, of course, but the reality on the street is so much different than in a padded ring.

For pure self defense, go for Krav Maga, it's more adaptable than most other forms of martial arts and it works brilliantly in tight spots. Secondly, realize that a fight in the real world will be so different than a sparring session. There is just no place for flashy moves, rediculous kicks or throws. MMA style submissions will never happen. You getting straddled with someone throwing jabbs at your face? That does happen, and it sucks.

Like, just learning a proper guard, not being afraid to take hits (Seriously, some people turn their backs on the attacker to protect their stomach etc. This is a natural response yes, but a stupid one) which is vital. Strenghten your knuckles, the underside of your forearms and your lower legs and you're already miles ahead of your average drunken fool who desperetly wants to prove his manhood.

As for philosophy, I cannot really comment. There is a bunch of asian martial arts that focuses heavily on just that.
 

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I've done tang soo do, tae kwon do, judo, ninjitsu and I've got a 1st dan black belt in karate. I'm also interested in learning krav maga in the future. The best way to defend oneself is by appearance and attitude. Criminal perpertrators are much more than likely to attack easy targets such as the elderly and females, than individuals who look as if they are black belt martial artists. I read that 90% of black belt holders don't get attacked during their lifetime. I think there's a simple reason for that. Few martial artists get to that stage of black belt level and when they do, they are likely to sustain the high level of physical fitness that got them there in the first place. Furthermore, most individuals who have the discipline and respect for rules & authority are unlikely to act in a manner that is likely to put themselves in harms way. My primary interest in martial arts is for reasons of physical fitness and as a challenging sport, defending myself is only a secondary consideration as I don't live in a rough neighbourhood. In terms of philosophy, I can't comment on that, as none of my teachers were interested in imparting their life knowledge in the same way that the fictional type 9 Mr Miyagi did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thing is .. Martial arts does not equal Self defense. Knowing a bunch of Martial arts moves will not save your ass in a streetfight. It will be helpful, of course, but the reality on the street is so much different than in a padded ring.

For pure self defense, go for Krav Maga, it's more adaptable than most other forms of martial arts and it works brilliantly in tight spots. Secondly, realize that a fight in the real world will be so different than a sparring session. There is just no place for flashy moves, rediculous kicks or throws. MMA style submissions will never happen. You getting straddled with someone throwing jabbs at your face? That does happen, and it sucks.

Like, just learning a proper guard, not being afraid to take hits (Seriously, some people turn their backs on the attacker to protect their stomach etc. This is a natural response yes, but a stupid one) which is vital. Strenghten your knuckles, the underside of your forearms and your lower legs and you're already miles ahead of your average drunken fool who desperetly wants to prove his manhood.

As for philosophy, I cannot really comment. There is a bunch of asian martial arts that focuses heavily on just that.
What's your opinion on Karate, Kung Fu, and Tae-kwon-do then?

Ultimately, I hope just to learn to have a good guard and get a little more strength and coordination in the process, not make flashy moves. I've done enough of those in my lifetime :laughing:

I looked into Krav Maga and that seems to be PRECISELY what I'm looking for! Thank you for your response and reality check. I need more of those *rolls eyes*.
 

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I took a Muay Thai class for about 2 months then began practicing at home. Some practical and refined attacks (Jab, straight, hook, Thai kick)

Just figure out what you want from martial arts and stick to your goals. I was not confident I could make it out of a fight and just wanted basic self defense. That was my goal and now I'm more confident that I can at least hold my own in a fight.
 

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What's your opinion on Karate, Kung Fu, and Tae-kwon-do then?

Ultimately, I hope just to learn to have a good guard and get a little more strength and coordination in the process, not make flashy moves. I've done enough of those in my lifetime :laughing:

I looked into Krav Maga and that seems to be PRECISELY what I'm looking for! Thank you for your response and reality check. I need more of those *rolls eyes*.
@DarkyNWO +1 for everything. Learning how to get hit and realizing it isn't the end of the world is incredibly important.

I do Taekwondo... it's a sport. Sure, we learn things that will/can help in a fight, but I've learned more about street fighting/self defense from a few kickboxing classes than 8 years of TKD.
 
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What's your opinion on Karate, Kung Fu, and Tae-kwon-do then?

Ultimately, I hope just to learn to have a good guard and get a little more strength and coordination in the process, not make flashy moves. I've done enough of those in my lifetime :laughing:

I looked into Krav Maga and that seems to be PRECISELY what I'm looking for! Thank you for your response and reality check. I need more of those *rolls eyes*.
Krav Maga is very good, A well rounded MMA school is very good as well, don't be duped into thinking it won't help you. Krav Maga I would say is probably #1 for street defense, MMA second. I've trained in mixed martial arts a while and have gotten into a few fights outside of the gym in that time. I can tell you for a concrete fact it helps immensely in all aspects, and that those "MMA style" submissions, aka jui jitsu, is probably the most effective part of it both in finishing and controlling a fight. Everyone can throw a punch, however, put two people of similar size in a clinch, one trained for lets say 1 year, the other never and the untrained guy is getting taken down and subbed or pounded out every time. The more you train the less size matters, because it is about leverage. The positioning alone affords you great control in fights as well, even against larger opponents.

It is important though that if you train MMA for this purpose, to find a GOOD school. There are a LOT of amateur schools and trainers out there that have no right teaching anything. You need to get used to taking hits and actually fighting.
 
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In terms of philosophy, I can't comment on that, as none of my teachers were interested in imparting their life knowledge in the same way that the fictional type 9 Mr Miyagi did.
I met Mr Miyagi. Well, he came and judged at one of my karate gradings. He was actually an accomplished martial artist in real life.

To answer the original question, other self-defense styles that are reasonably effective and also good for getting fit include Tong Long (Northern praying mantis style), Hapkido, and *****.
 

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I trained under a student of Gokor Chivichyan and Gene Lebell who was a 6th degree black belt for a few years. I did Judo, Kick Boxing, Juijitsu, and Self-Defense (disarming people with guns/knives, defending against multiple attackers, etc.) and limited weapons training with swords, nun-chucks, and staves. These and boxing training from my father who was an Olympic Boxer.

It was all super fun, I don't really recommend Judo, though. If properly trained in it, you can end a fight with one throw but you are very prone to knee injuries in it. I, personally, think that if you're looking to be able to defend yourself/ be able to hold your own in street fights, Boxing and Juijitsu are the way to go since Boxing will give you great stand-up skills and 90% of fights go to the ground.

As far as the whole perspective change thing, you can change your perspective by doing anything. Martial Arts will only give you a perspective change if you're looking for it, and only the one you are looking for. If you were to take up painting, on the other hand, you could get the same perspective change just as easily. Basically, you'll see things how you want to, no matter what you do.
 

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The thing with street fights in my experience, is that no matter how skilled you are, if things do go to the ground and you're getting the best of it, your attacker's friends will kick you in the head until you stop moving.
 

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I met Mr Miyagi. Well, he came and judged at one of my karate gradings. He was actually an accomplished martial artist in real life.

To answer the original question, other self-defense styles that are reasonably effective and also good for getting fit include Tong Long (Northern praying mantis style), Hapkido, and *****.

Well, that's something new I learnt about Pat Morita. I stayed with karate as long as I did, as it was the most challenging of the martial arts I tried so far. Karate was quite popular with the police in the area. However, they discovered that several years of karate didn't prevent them from getting seriously injured in street riots or by perpertrators.
 

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Well, that's something new I learnt about Pat Morita. I stayed with karate as long as I did, as it was the most challenging of the martial arts I tried so far. Karate was quite popular with the police in the area. However, they discovered that several years of karate didn't prevent them from getting seriously injured in street riots or by perpertrators.
I think any martial training increases your abilities in conflict, but obviously some are more effective than others in serious situations. Against more than one person it is very difficult not to get hurt, no matter what. The situation you find yourself in makes an enormous difference. I don't believe in luck, but can't think of a better word right now to explain what I mean about whether or not you get hurt when attacked by several people. However, one thing that one of my instructors told me (he had won against groups on the street; I had lost) was that the only way to do it was to maneuver yourself so that you were always facing one person at a time. When I was in the situation I had always been surrounded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The thing with street fights in my experience, is that no matter how skilled you are, if things do go to the ground and you're getting the best of it, your attacker's friends will kick you in the head until you stop moving.
Here goes my idealist rant:

Any group that attempts to gang up on me I'd want to bring justice to.

Guess I'll have to do it one person at a time....
 

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I think any martial training increases your abilities in conflict, but obviously some are more effective than others in serious situations. Against more than one person it is very difficult not to get hurt, no matter what. The situation you find yourself in makes an enormous difference. I don't believe in luck, but can't think of a better word right now to explain what I mean about whether or not you get hurt when attacked by several people. However, one thing that one of my instructors told me (he had won against groups on the street; I had lost) was that the only way to do it was to maneuver yourself so that you were always facing one person at a time. When I was in the situation I had always been surrounded.
My korean TKD instructor was the former coach of the Australian olympic team and I'm sure is ISTJ 1. My german karate instructor I think is ISTJ 8. He was previously working in a south african mine as a supervisor when one of his workers decided that the best way of to resolve an argument was to attempt to crack open his skull with a shovel. My karate instructor said that this was apparently due to a misunderstanding. Anyway, to avoid any misunderstandings in the future, he decided to take up karate and eventually ended up in Australia.

Many of the main martial arts are SJ in nature: rules, traditions and hierarchy. Much of what is taught is not centred around effectiveness, efficiency or practicality in defending oneself, which would be beneficial in street fighting. Which is where SP artisans strengths are, tactical proficiency.
 

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I do Pencak Silat. In case if you never heard of it, the movie "The Raid: Redemption" is basically a Pencak Silat show. It has the philosophy behind it, but most of the practitioners I've met never truly implement the philosophy in their daily life, so I'd say its just crap. I like Pencak Silat because it has beautiful yet practical moves, it's like watching martial art ballet.

I read that 90% of black belt holders don't get attacked during their lifetime.
Interesting. I'm a female and I have never get attacked by bad strangers either, even though I always come home alone from office (usually around 11 pm to 3 am). It took me about 20 minutes of walk from my office to my flat, and I must go through really dark alleys. Nobody ever touch me during my solitary journey.

The only time when I get attacked was when some high school boys were fighting inside a train. All passengers got out of the train or move to another carriage to avoid them. I didn't because I was reading Harry Potter (LOL) and I don't really care about the fights either. But one of the boys was accidentally elbowed my face during the fight. Big mistake. So I end up beating all those boys because I got pissed at them.
 
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