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Discussion Starter #1
E-Most children are very social and outgoing

N- Lots of children are unrealistic very not caring about small things

T- They say what appears to them is true(the mean type of honesty)

P- Lots of children very unserious unschelduled and relaxed. Also very messy
 

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I wasn't. I was an N and a P, but certainly not an E or a T.
 

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Well truley this is before you devolep an actually distinct personailty. How far are you going back?
 

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I was an INFP as far back as I can remember, and further back, according to the things my parents tell me. I'm sure a lot of people do change, though. My brother seemed more S and J when he was little, but gradually developed his N and his P preferences around the tenth grade. Until then, I would have sworn he was an ESFJ instead of an ENFP. He was always an E and an F. If I was ever an E, it was impossible to tell because of my shyness, and I can't remember ever being a T. In fact, I was pretty much against T qualities when I was young, and had a very strong bias. I thought of things in terms of good and evil, and considered T qualities evil. That was before I had ever heard of the MBTI, which forced me to reconsider and be more tolerant.
 
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We're talking the classic archetypal children, yeah? Because nowadays, most American children are very different.

E-Most children are very social and outgoing
Most people in general, whether child or adult, are extroverts. But I would say there's an equal distribution of intro and extroversion among both ages since the preference is inborn. Equal to the ratio of introverts to extroverts in adults, I mean. I know that extroverts are the majority.

N- Lots of children are unrealistic very not caring about small things
I would say the high activity and focus on immediate gratification of most children would give them a general preference for Se. In the classic sense, children are grounded in the present, respond better to straightforward communication, and most children aren't thinking about what they're going to be doing when they're 20 as much as what they're going to be doing on the weekend. Those are all examples of Se. I do agree that Ne is more widely accepted among children, though, so one point for ENTP. Kids come up with the craziest ideas.

T- They say what appears to them is true(the mean type of honesty)
I'd say ignorance rather than preference. For instance, would a feeling child who actually knows that something will hurt someone be as unhesitating to say it?

P- Lots of children very unserious unschelduled and relaxed. Also very messy
I would generally agree that most children seem to have a preference for extroverted perceiving (hence my view on Se above).
 

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I've seen it said, that the vast majority of children meet the DSM diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality disorder, and people call us sociopaths, a lot, so the Ne in me can see what you're getting at. lol I was probably always an ENTP. I was a mean, ornery, little shit, and constantly in trouble, and when I would get caught and punished, the only lesson I ever learned was how to get better at not getting caught and how to get better at putting the "fear of god" into those who would tell on me. I was only that way, outside of school, though. I was very introverted at school, and very polite and obedient.
 

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I was more on the feeler side of things, but for a while, I was a tad.

But other kids I knew were a veriety of types.

There are a couple of kids I've know I've known have had strong Ni, both NFJs, even with my poor people reading skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We're talking the classic archetypal children, yeah? Because nowadays, most American children are very different.


Most people in general, whether child or adult, are extroverts. But I would say there's an equal distribution of intro and extroversion among both ages since the preference is inborn. Equal to the ratio of introverts to extroverts in adults, I mean. I know that extroverts are the majority.


I would say the high activity and focus on immediate gratification of most children would give them a general preference for Se. In the classic sense, children are grounded in the present, respond better to straightforward communication, and most children aren't thinking about what they're going to be doing when they're 20 as much as what they're going to be doing on the weekend. Those are all examples of Se. I do agree that Ne is more widely accepted among children, though, so one point for ENTP. Kids come up with the craziest ideas.


I'd say ignorance rather than preference. For instance, would a feeling child who actually knows that something will hurt someone be as unhesitating to say it?



I would generally agree that most children seem to have a preference for extroverted perceiving (hence my view on Se above).
I always end up debating with you...

E-I would say most children are extraverts because they have no

N- I guess i could agree. Although plenty of childrens want to be astronauts and whatnot.

T- Most people consider Ts to be ignorant. And yes to your qeustions
 

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It's taken me a while to work out my son, but having done so, it seems to me his F has been pretty obvious since he was a baby. I know a few introverted kids, and kids who really need order in their lives, get stressed in the presence of chaos or lack of planning, so no, I reckon I have met plenty kids who are not ENTP. My daiughter is, and she is not typical of most children, that's for sure.
 

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I'm not trying to debate you. I'm just trying to join the discussion.



Eh, I forgot about that whole "I wanna be ____ when I grow up!" period.
You act like debateing somone sis bad.
 

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I was definitely I and N ever since I can remember.
 

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I've worked with plenty of kids, and I can definitively say that they are not all extroverts. I've encountered many kids who were quite shy and tended to be more reserved and quiet than others. Some were in between, and others were very loud and attention-seeking. I think introversion and extroversion can be witnessed from a very young age. Thinking and feeling aren't as obvious, but I think they are still present. My INFP little sister is definitely a feeler. She can be very witty and clever, but in actuality she is very sensitive and her feelings are easily hurt.

As far as N and P, I agree that many children seem take on the appearance of the those traits, but I think this is just due to the fact that they have not matured yet. They are still in the carefree, imaginative stage of their lives.
 

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kids are stereotyped for being an N and expect them to be an N and eventually grow up to be an S or stay as an N.

E or I, it depends. T or F, also depends. J or P, most likely a P.
 

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The different functions develop at different stages. If I remember correctly, a child will first develop SFP. This lines up with Pageat's stages of moral development where good and bad is determined based off the consequences. Good provides good consequences, bad provides undesired consequences. Immediately following that stage is the stage where good or bad reflect their parents desires. They are sensitive to what the parents want and will do the "right" thing because it makes mom happy. This is still under F. They haven't developed N at that point, so they aren't capable of the abstract thought required to understand just why things are good or bad, or have a reason beyond what is concrete. This also goes along with the monkey see monkey do stage of learning, where they will simply copy and mimic what they see those around them doing. Having not developed N, they have very poor problem solving skills on their own. J is typically next to develop, so you'll see most children go through a stage where they have to do things or have things a certain way and they might get mad at you if you deviate, even if it's easier a different way. N and T are the last things to develop, however I don't remember in which order they typically occur.

The functions are not set in stone or hard wired as if to say, this is the way we are and HAVE to be from birth. As a child's brain develops and becomes capable of more complex thought processes, the different functions will develop.You have to develop the ability to use the functions before you can settle on a preference. Children may also "flip flop" functions as they're developing.

So to answer the question, no, not all children are ENTP's, no child develops as an ENTP initially, and you won't see a very young child being ENTP.
 

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I have most definitely been F for as far as I can remember, and before that for as far as my parents remember. And an Introvert from the age of four at least, always standing back observing before I joined the other kids to play. I also clearly remember all the other kids having very distinct personalities in kindergarten.
I know of someone who became a vegetarian at the age of five, despite her family being anything but, when she realized the chicken they were eating for dinner was the same one she'd seen running around outside. I find this highly unlikely for a T.
When I am around little kids their different personalities definitely shine through, there are those more shy and inclined to observing, who like playing with legos and puzzles more than dolls and action figures, those who don't care much for authority and abiding rules, while others are very careful to do so, and as well as those who have to have things a certain way, and complain when us oldies are doing something "wrong". My cousin at 6 is clearly J, amongst other things having certain colors of clothing she has to were depending on the different days of the week.
If there is any one personality children have before they have developed the others, I agree with WildWinds that SFP sounds far more likely for the same reasons, although I think they develop into other types at a very early age, maybe starting from 2 yrs old and than slowly transcending.
 
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