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It seems to me that a majority of musicians tend to be sensors. This made me wonder if intuitives could be as talented as sensors when it comes to making music. It's kind of disheartening when all of my idols in the music industry are sensors and I am not.
 

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The people I like are intuitive.

Joe Satriani: INTP - for my taste he's the best
Steve Vai: ENTP - apprentice of Joe

So it really depends on your musical taste.
 

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No, I don't think so. I'm not sure exactly what type of musician you're referring to, but one of my friends (an ENFP) is extremely musically talented. She plays multiple instruments very well and is aiming to be a band director. And when it comes to composing music, you have to have knowledge of music theory (which is called "theory" for a reason), which intuitives might even be able to grasp better than sensors. In short, I really don't think the N/S preference makes much of a difference when it comes to music.
 

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The majority of people are sensors (70% S and 30% N) so that might have something to do with your observation. ^-^

Plus you shouldn't let a typology theory tell you how to live your life.
 

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As far as s/n goes, I don't think it strongly affects how people express themselves in music. It depends strongly on the genre of music. Don't be discouraged!

Hey, even if the first premise (S>N at music) was true, it would imply that your music would be unique, which is a compliment. :D
 

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I think David Keirsey had quite a few insightful things to say, but the ISFP=artist thing was probably his biggest mistake. For more, see this post and this post.

Fifty years of studies (MBTI and Big Five both) have pretty clearly established that creativity/imagination and artistic interests are quite strongly correlated with an N preference, and this is consistent with both Jung's and Myers's takes on the types, and it applies whether the materials the artist/creator is working with are abstract (e.g., novelists) or concrete (e.g., photographers and painters).

The Big Five factor that corresponds to an MBTI N preference is called Openness to Experience. The most well-established version of the Big Five is McCrae & Costa's NEO-PI-R, which breaks down each of the five factors into six "facets." The Openness to Experience facets include the following (with quoted descriptions from McCrae & Costa):

  • Fantasy: "Individuals who are open to fantasy have a vivid imagination and an active fantasy life. ... They elaborate and develop their fantasies and believe that imagination contributes to a rich and creative life."
  • Aesthetics: "High scorers on this scale have a deep appreciation for art and beauty. ... They need not have artistic talent. ... However, for many of them, interest in the arts will lead them to develop a wider knowledge and appreciation than the average individual."
 

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Fifty years of studies (MBTI and Big Five both) have pretty clearly established that creativity/imagination and artistic interests are quite strongly correlated with an N preference, and this is consistent with both Jung's and Myers's takes on the types, and it applies whether the materials the artist/creator is working with are abstract (e.g., novelists) or concrete (e.g., photographers and painters).
That is peculiar, one might think that relying heavily on one's senses and impressions of sensation would make sensors good with materials that can be sensed. At best this would prove that sensing is not good for what it is theoretically good for.
 

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That is peculiar, one might think that relying heavily on one's senses and impressions of sensation would make sensors good with materials that can be sensed. At best this would prove that sensing is not good for what it is theoretically good for.
As a musician, it is not question of senses or materials. There's, definitely a path of passion and practice(in many ways) in a musician's career.
If you ask me, I hadn't exactly problems with the physical technique of the instruments(aside from playing intensively difficult pieces) but most of the time the problem came on lack of organisation time to learn(in case you're self-thaught), lack of memory time to remember how the musical pieces were(in fact, musicians rely mainly in the muscle memories) and lack of enough knowledge time to compose.
All of these qualities I mentioned weren't exactly what someone would think, which is notoriously favourable to sensing or unfavourable to intuiting- While some of them can be typable, these are problems everyone seems to suffers as humans. The surprise doesn't come on sensing not being favourable but intuiting being favourable at a noticeable extent.
 

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That is peculiar, one might think that relying heavily on one's senses and impressions of sensation would make sensors good with materials that can be sensed. At best this would prove that sensing is not good for what it is theoretically good for.
To quote from that second post I linked to:

Of the 114 professional fine artists in one study shown in the second edition of the MBTI Manual, 91% of them were N's (65% NF and 26% NT). More specifically, 25 were INFP and only one was ISFP. It's pretty common to find internet forumites assuming that, if the relevant art involves physical materials and tools (like painting), it must be "Se" territory rather than "Ne" territory, but as the Manual explained: "Because true creativity in the arts requires highly differentiated use of tools and materials, one might expect artists to prefer sensing perception rather than intuition. Empirically, N types outnumber S types in art students and among artists. The theoretical explanation is that the insights and inspirations provided by intuition are more important, but true artistic skill requires the development of S skills for use in the service of N inspirations."​
 

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To quote from that second post I linked to:

Of the 114 professional fine artists in one study shown in the second edition of the MBTI Manual, 91% of them were N's (65% NF and 26% NT). More specifically, 25 were INFP and only one was ISFP. It's pretty common to find internet forumites assuming that, if the relevant art involves physical materials and tools (like painting), it must be "Se" territory rather than "Ne" territory, but as the Manual explained: "Because true creativity in the arts requires highly differentiated use of tools and materials, one might expect artists to prefer sensing perception rather than intuition. Empirically, N types outnumber S types in art students and among artists. The theoretical explanation is that the insights and inspirations provided by intuition are more important, but true artistic skill requires the development of S skills for use in the service of N inspirations."​
That doesn't explain why N types outnumber S types. Theoretically it is just as possible for S types to use N inspirations in the service of their skills, but you won't say that because the data supposedly suggests a correlation between N types and artistic tendencies.
 

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I would guess that it depends on the genre. Jazz musicians in particular probably lean heavily N (Ne to be exact), since improvisation requires one to be able to intuit patterns on the fly and develop parts that complement the greater whole.
 

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It seems to me that a majority of musicians tend to be sensors. This made me wonder if intuitives could be as talented as sensors when it comes to making music. It's kind of disheartening when all of my idols in the music industry are sensors and I am not.
I can think of a number people purported to be intuitives who are quite good. But I think people's type affects how they approach making music. So if you are trying to emulate say, an Se's persons approach to making music, you will probably always feel inferior. You have to do what works for you.

For instance I do drawings and paintings. I look at other people's paintings and see things I can't naturally do, and if I try to emulate them.. the results are often not so good. But if I do a drawing/painting my way, people usually like the result
 
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