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Discussion Starter #1
Of course, any type could be depressed and any type could deal with all sorts of psychological issues, this isn't open to debate.

Rather, what I want to discuss here is if some types are statistically more likely to deal with these issues than others.

Taking into account my IRL experience, INFPs seem to be. Honestly, it isn't very easy to be any INxx type in the modern world. Sometimes it feels we are not "wired" to live in it.
 

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The answer is yes, but MBTI is not a good representation of personality. Take a couple of people of one type and they may be very different people.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The answer is yes, but MBTI is not a good representation of personality. Take a couple of people of one type and they may be very different people.
True, but they must share some things in common to be part of a certain category (a type), otherwise this category isn't meaningful or worth discussing.
 

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I sometimes wonder how much each effects the other. Those who are depressed might just type themselves as INFP, and I also definitely think that INFPs are prone to depression. I think it works both ways.

INxx types may not get enough sunlight and exercise, which stave off depression.
 

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True, but they must share some things in common to be part of a certain category (a type), otherwise this category isn't meaningful or worth discussing.
That's true and to add onto my previous response, I'd say that a better predictor of negative emotion/depression/psychological pathology is not personality per say, but rather particular genetic indicators and one's individual circumstances/history. For example, I think it's generally accepted that children who grow up without a positive male role-model tend to face a variety of psychological issues, especially related to being anti-social and not having proper respect for boundaries. Children who grow up without the proper relationship with their mother also have an arguably worse time integrating with society in a healthy manner. So in terms of personality, I think certain types can be more prone to running into particular problems pertaining to the mind but it's really hard to say with any certainty seeing as MBTI is not objectively measurable like particular hormone levels are for example. It may just be that there is no correlation between MBTI type and depression rather that each type has its own path that leads them towards depression. One type might overindulge in sensual pleasures while another one might be prone to reasoning themselves into nihilism by logic alone.
 

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That's true and to add onto my previous response, I'd say that a better predictor of negative emotion/depression/psychological pathology is not personality per say, but rather particular genetic indicators and one's individual circumstances/history. For example, I think it's generally accepted that children who grow up without a positive male role-model tend to face a variety of psychological issues, especially related to being anti-social and not having proper respect for boundaries. Children who grow up without the proper relationship with their mother also have an arguably worse time integrating with society in a healthy manner. So in terms of personality, I think certain types can be more prone to running into particular problems pertaining to the mind but it's really hard to say with any certainty seeing as MBTI is not objectively measurable like particular hormone levels are for example. It may just be that there is no correlation between MBTI type and depression rather that each type has its own path that leads them towards depression. One type might overindulge in sensual pleasures while another one might be prone to reasoning themselves into nihilism by logic alone.
I agree, environmental circumstances play a huge role. Even though I’m an INFP I adapt to certain situations and take on a “S” or a “J” behavior. People adapt differently.
 

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There are probably some statistical correlations. Like the stereotypical ExxP ADHD example, ExFx bipolar, Ti-dominant schizoid, or whatever. Those are probably too stereotypical to be truly accurate, but there may be some patterns overall.
 

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There's a difference between clinically depressed & depressive people. I notice type 4s as the type that tend to be the most depressive. A clinically diagnosed, chemical depression doesn't care what type anyone is.
 

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There's a difference between clinically depressed & depressive people. I notice type 4s as the type that tend to be the most depressive. A clinically diagnosed, chemical depression doesn't care what type anyone is.
How would you make the distinction between a “depressive person” and someone who is “clinically depressed”? Just out of curiosity. I think most depressive people have some sort of clinical depression.
 
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How would you make the distinction between a “depressive person” and someone who is “clinically depressed”? Just out of curiosity. I think most depressive people have some sort of clinical depression.
I know a good number of people that have not been diagnosed with depression but tend to always be down. It is a struggle for them to see joy in life. They don't seem nearly as extreme as those that I know that have actually been diagnosed, but there is definitely an inner turmoil there. But who knows, maybe they just need further tests or something has been missed.
 

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Not to derail the discussion, but I think it's an error to speak of depression as some mysterious or all-encompassing condition (Not that anyone here is, but I notice that depression seems to be interpreted as some sort of disease in popular culture). I think @Kelly Kapowski is right to make a distinction between being depressive and being clinically depressed. I don't know the statistics but I suspect that most experienced depression is simply the expected result of a life not well lived (not that this makes the experience any less valid or serious, because it certainly is). We are complicated beings with complicated lives and I think the best way to combat depression is to attempt to best understand that individual's source of it and to provide them the tools to combat their suffering and the source of it thus enabling them to live lives in which they are armed against any potential hardships.

As for clinical depression (which I'm defining here as a chemical imbalance in the individual's brain as opposed to the logical depressive response one might have to a unfulfilled life), I believe that the proper method of helping someone in this category is to do the above to rule out depressiveness and once the diagnosis is confidently made in clinical depression, to then look into ways to re-calibrate the chemical imbalance if possible.
 
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