Personality Cafe banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Generation Y: 1977 to 1994

I was born in 86. I cannot relate easily to someone born in 92+ or 82-.

Someone 5 years older than me I consider as in a further stage of life than me. Someone born in 92 it's "you didn't feel the happiness of Windows 95?, you don't know what MPlayer is?, you don't know the creeking fax sounds as your dialup modem connected to AOL?"

Anyone 5 years older than me is like a mentor. Anyone 5 years younger than me cannot relate to all the events I went through in my time.

I think my age +/- 2 years is the age range of easy relations and understanding.

Can someone born in 92 really relate to someone born in 79?
Do these generation groupings really make sense to you?


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Interesting point. I guess in a way they aren't that accurate. I think it's due to the technology boom, and our rapidly changing and diverse society. Tech, politics, globalization, it's all moving insanely quick, therefore it's harder to relate to people +/- 5 years from us.
I was born in '88 and I know a lot of people under 40 who are pretty savvy with technology/media of today. But I feel like kids born In the 90s should totally be grouped I'm their own categories lol. I grew up in an age where technology and media was just beginning to reinvent itself, so I feel like I didn't gain much exposure to some things the 90's kids got.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Interesting point. I guess in a way they aren't that accurate. I think it's due to the technology boom, and our rapidly changing and diverse society. Tech, politics, globalization, it's all moving insanely quick, therefore it's harder to relate to people +/- 5 years from us.
I was born in '88 and I know a lot of people under 40 who are pretty savvy with technology/media of today. But I feel like kids born In the 90s should totally be grouped I'm their own categories lol. I grew up in an age where technology and media was just beginning to reinvent itself, so I feel like I didn't gain much exposure to some things the 90's kids got.
Agreed, but I'd put the line around 1992/93. I think people born in the very early 90s are not much of a different breed from people born as far back as the early eighties. We grew up with a lot of the same things you did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Agreed, but I'd put the line around 1992/93. I think people born in the very early 90s are not much of a different breed from people born as far back as the early eighties. We grew up with a lot of the same things you did.
Hey, are you the same donnie darko who posted on inthe00s many years back?

I'm almost as much of a decadeology nerd as you.
 

·
Moderator
Wielding the mafia banhammer
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
I remember:

-making fun of the hair caught in the reels of the projector when we got to watch movies at school
-sniffing homework pages fresh from the Ditto machine
-playing Oregon Trail and Number Munchers on an Apple II
-wearing out cassette tapes in the Walkman


You kids get off my lawn.

/born in '79
 
  • Like
Reactions: tangosthenes

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,801 Posts
Hey guy, I was born before you and I never experienced the joy of Windows 95 and no I don't know what an MPlayer is.

I remember the creaking fax sounds though to dial up AOL. Wow. LOLOLOLOL.

77 to 94 is less than twenty years. It's pretty typical for a generation. A generation, from any perspective, is approximately 20 years.

In fact what most people have problems with, with the 77 cut off point, is that Gen X is only 11 years long.

Look, in the cell phone thread I saw a Gen Z kid say he just got one because they didn't have the technology for cell phones where he's from. I mean, there are people who are much younger who grew up in rural environments who apparently could relate to Gen X in terms of technology deprivation, not to speak of Gen Y.

Then I saw someone who is Gen Y say s/he doesn't have a cell phone and never will. I'm thinking, what age are you, one-hundred and fucking two? My Silent Generation grandfather had a cell phone before he died.

A lot of this stuff is personality related and regional even, maybe. I grew up in a pretty rural area until I was about 10 years old, and I could probably relate to that Gen Z kid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Then I saw someone who is Gen Y say s/he doesn't have a cell phone and never will. I'm thinking, what age are you, one-hundred and fucking two? My Silent Generation grandfather had a cell phone before he died.
This made me laugh! My great-grandmother had a cell phone before she died as well. She was apart of the Greatest Generation? Born in 1921! Granted she didn't really know how to use the phone but.... She had one! HA!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Interesting point. I guess in a way they aren't that accurate. I think it's due to the technology boom, and our rapidly changing and diverse society. Tech, politics, globalization, it's all moving insanely quick, therefore it's harder to relate to people +/- 5 years from us.
I was born in '88 and I know a lot of people under 40 who are pretty savvy with technology/media of today. But I feel like kids born In the 90s should totally be grouped I'm their own categories lol. I grew up in an age where technology and media was just beginning to reinvent itself, so I feel like I didn't gain much exposure to some things the 90's kids got.
Yeah, I think that's an interesting point as well. Maybe generational cohorts are getting smaller--in terms of the chronology spectrum--because of the technology boom. Things are changing at a much fast rate now than they were even 20 years ago. I've even heard people refer to generation Y stretching to those born in the early 2000s. They're still very young right now, but in 10 years from now I'm not sure how well I will be able to relate to someone born in the post Y2K world.

Maybe we need to rethink what it means to be part of a generation. Maybe the only thing that defines us is that we're all essentially digital natives, born in a world where computers rule our everyday lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Sometimes I feel like these categories are irrelevant. For example, in my dissertation research "Millennials" have been defined as people born as early as 1977 to those born up through 2003. I find that these people should not be coined such, just because of their birth dates, when they probably do not have much in common. However, I do think that grouping people by decades is much more reasonable, because you are bound to have some shared experiences (like music, movies, current events, fashion, etc.) Actually doing some dissertation research involving "Millennials" if you wouldn't mind taking a 12-Q survey: https://qtrial2014.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eXKe1kZPi8uiP8F
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,801 Posts
I also think cuspers may resemble each other, I talk about this everywhere, but now that my barely Gen Z nephew is older I have noticed he resembles younger Gen Y in some ways. Like on Facebook he thinks it's funny to say imma...blah blah blah...like Kenye. My ESFP did this just yesterday when he text me and said imma call you, and he is roughly the same distance of years over Gen Y. They're about five years apart. Don't judge me.

But I have similar similarity to younger Gen X being an older Gen Y.

Nothing is going to be exact.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,801 Posts
Yeah, I think that's an interesting point as well. Maybe generational cohorts are getting smaller--in terms of the chronology spectrum--because of the technology boom. Things are changing at a much fast rate now than they were even 20 years ago. I've even heard people refer to generation Y stretching to those born in the early 2000s. They're still very young right now, but in 10 years from now I'm not sure how well I will be able to relate to someone born in the post Y2K world.

Maybe we need to rethink what it means to be part of a generation. Maybe the only thing that defines us is that we're all essentially digital natives, born in a world where computers rule our everyday lives.
The criteria for the division helps with identifying similarity style. For example people from 77 and 94 are probably more similar in relation to technology and maybe even general attitudes. But division of 82 to 03 honestly makes less sense to to me frankly. Cuspers mostly share popular culture and maybe politics. My 97 born Gen Z nephew is probably similar to Gen Y, especially his young mother and aunts, in politics, because my sister was so young when she had him, so we raised him close to us. He practically has the exact same political views and attitudes towards things the environment and ageism. But yes in terms of popular culture he has less in common with us, with the exception of emo and Adult Swim.

By some estimates he would still be Gen Y though. I just can't fathom it though for people born in the early 00s.

By some standards I am Gen X and with memories and popular culture perhaps, but I failed the how Gen X are you test haha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
At the end of the day, generations are man-made constructs. There is no anatomical difference between Baby Boomers/Gen X/Gen Y/Gen Z (other than age obviously). So because of that, generational boundaries are completely subjective. When someone asks "what is Gen X/Y/Z?", there is no right or wrong answer. Personally, I'm of the belief that the closer you are in age to someone, the more you will have in common (on average), regardless of 'generation.'
 

·
Registered
ENXP
Joined
·
706 Posts
I was born in 1993 and so I am technically generation Y, but I really cannot relate to people on the same level pre-1988 (a.k.a. those who are already out of college/grad school). Nope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
The criteria for the division helps with identifying similarity style. For example people from 77 and 94 are probably more similar in relation to technology and maybe even general attitudes. But division of 82 to 03 honestly makes less sense to to me frankly. Cuspers mostly share popular culture and maybe politics. My 97 born Gen Z nephew is probably similar to Gen Y, especially his young mother and aunts, in politics, because my sister was so young when she had him, so we raised him close to us. He practically has the exact same political views and attitudes towards things the environment and ageism. But yes in terms of popular culture he has less in common with us, with the exception of emo and Adult Swim.

By some estimates he would still be Gen Y though. I just can't fathom it though for people born in the early 00s.

By some standards I am Gen X and with memories and popular culture perhaps, but I failed the how Gen X are you test haha.
I'd personally say Gen Y ends around '95 or '96 because they still have memories of the 20th century (albiet vague memories, but that still counts). Most people born a year or two after me seem to have grown up with the same music and culture that I did too. '97 is pushing it though, as the core of their childhood would be closer to the end of the 2000s and probably have little to no memory of life in the 20th century (keep in mind, our memory doesn't start developing until age 3 and isn't fully developed until about age 7).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I'd personally say Gen Y ends around '95 or '96 because they still have memories of the 20th century (albiet vague memories, but that still counts). Most people born a year or two after me seem to have grown up with the same music and culture that I did too. '97 is pushing it though, as the core of their childhood would be closer to the end of the 2000s and probably have little to no memory of life in the 20th century (keep in mind, our memory doesn't start developing until age 3 and isn't fully developed until about age 7).
I have some vague memories of the 80s such as my Teddy Ruxpin and other toys, a couple shows, and the way things looked like in general.

However, I wouldn't really call it my era. Up through 1992 the environment looked pretty 80s. I remember my house had a carpeted bathroom, lights around the mirror, a waterbed, floral furniture, glass block windows...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
I'd personally say Gen Y ends around '95 or '96 because they still have memories of the 20th century (albiet vague memories, but that still counts). Most people born a year or two after me seem to have grown up with the same music and culture that I did too. '97 is pushing it though, as the core of their childhood would be closer to the end of the 2000s and probably have little to no memory of life in the 20th century (keep in mind, our memory doesn't start developing until age 3 and isn't fully developed until about age 7).
Same here. I feel that people born in 1992 to 1996 grew up with the same stuff because we can all remember the last of the 20th century before the millennium hit and our core childhood was not in the late 00s.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,801 Posts
I'd personally say Gen Y ends around '95 or '96 because they still have memories of the 20th century (albiet vague memories, but that still counts). Most people born a year or two after me seem to have grown up with the same music and culture that I did too. '97 is pushing it though, as the core of their childhood would be closer to the end of the 2000s and probably have little to no memory of life in the 20th century (keep in mind, our memory doesn't start developing until age 3 and isn't fully developed until about age 7).
I agree. I think we (Millennials or Gen Y, I tend to say Gen Y because I feel sometimes like Millennial applies to people who are 90s born, but really, we are the people who "came of age" in the beginning of the 21st century, and yes, I did). I think a requirement for being Gen Y should be being old enough to remember at least a piece of the 20th century, having some memories before 9/11, having some memories before 2000, and that is why I prefer the 77-94 time period, because it puts us snugly into remembering the 80s and 90s, but not the 70s, and that's crucial because Gen X OWNS the 70s.

I read an academic analysis of my favorite current artist, Lana Del Rey, and why she is perfect for a crumbling American empire, and part of what they listed was the idea that Gen Y invests a lot into the past and nostalgia, it's almost like the "No Future" prediction of the Sex Pistols has literally manifested itself ..."the future is a retrospective"...but I really get sick of Gen Y getting referred to as kids now. We are between 20-37 now, and fill the "younger adult" niche, and I don't think Lana appeals to "kids" at all (in the manner of Justin Bieber or Taylor Swift) but actually garners a majority adult audience of Milennials/ Gen Y with a smaller percentage younger and older (she is actually so popular that both the 13 year old and 64 yo demographic contain LDR fans, according to a survey on music taste by age)...but the article went on and on with words like "kids" and "youth" and even "maiden" though Del Rey herself is either 28 or 29 and not a maiden by any stretch of the imagination according to the subtle, sultry sexuality of her music, that tends in truth to harken back to the Silent Generation, early Hollywood glamour, black and white film, jazz singers, "my man ain't no good" and pre-feminist "he hit me and it felt like a kiss"...this isn't KIDS MUSIC. But we are still called kids. I remember seeing someone else comment on it, that she was 30 and wondered how weird the 35 year olds felt being regarded as "kids" or "youth" as Gen Y adults. It's demeaning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
Generation Y: 1977 to 1994

I was born in 86. I cannot relate easily to someone born in 92+ or 82-.

Someone 5 years older than me I consider as in a further stage of life than me. Someone born in 92 it's "you didn't feel the happiness of Windows 95?, you don't know what MPlayer is?, you don't know the creeking fax sounds as your dialup modem connected to AOL?"

Anyone 5 years older than me is like a mentor. Anyone 5 years younger than me cannot relate to all the events I went through in my time.

I think my age +/- 2 years is the age range of easy relations and understanding.

Can someone born in 92 really relate to someone born in 79?
Do these generation groupings really make sense to you?


Don't be knocking that. I was born in '92 and grew up with a crappy old '95 PC, know what floppy discs are and, like most other people in the world, know the sound of a dialup connection. I never used MSN, though.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top