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are you now..

  • in a quite highly-paid job AND you enjoy it much!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • not so well-paid job, but most important is you enjoy it!

    Votes: 12 37.5%
  • in a high-paid job but you don't enjoy it

    Votes: 4 12.5%
  • not all of above (please explain it)

    Votes: 16 50.0%

  • Total voters
    32
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Discussion Starter #1
Are you currently doing a job that you enjoy/passionate,..or a "have-to" job?

what I mean by "have-to" job is, as you might've already guessed, a typical high-paying, suit-and-ties, 9-to-5 corporate-ish jobs, any combination of them.

So are you currently brave enough to do a job that you enjoy/passionate, even though you know that the road ahead would probably be very damn tough ie: not making enough money or very little money, not highly-lucrative job, etc yet you really enjoy/passionate in it?

and one more question: is it perfectly normal, or is it actually rather a bit 'spoiled' when you tell ur parents that you don't care what they think, and all you want to do in life is just to do (or pick/choose) a job that you can enjoy or be passionate, regardless if it's not a BIG-money, highly-paid or high-status job?
 

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Have to job, but def not high pay! But it's helping me pay off undergrad student loans as well as take classes in a diff field (speech therapy...not a passion, but I enjoy it) while I'm working.

Honestly, there's nothing that I want to do careerwise that I feel passionate about. I think if I did, I'd get tired of whatever it was I was passionate about.
 

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I have a minimum-wage job that I hate. Seriously, during an 8-hour work day I have 5 minutes once an hour to go to the bathroom and one half-hour break that is taken from my paycheck.. And that's it!
 

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I'm a computer programmer. I like my job, but I don't love my job like I use to. I say my job use to be an 8 and now it's a 6.5 and nothing's really changed about my job except me. INFPs make two assumptions with work which I don't understand.

1. They assume that the job their currently passionate about will always be something the continue to be passionate about.
2. They assume that building a work style equates to building a life style.

Both of those, I've discovered are completely untrue. No INFP, I've ever met or talked to online or in real life continues to be passionate about their initial chosen vocation. So when I see all the threads about INFPs trying to figure out their perfect career, I just shake my head wondering why their so stuck on something that they'll love for about 4 years and then just kind of like or grow to hate later. There's a huge difference between doing what you love on your own terms and doing what you love on a day-to-day basis for a company.

Also, what you do and why you do it is just your work style. And what you choose to do and how much you earn affects your life style (whether you get to travel, how much debt you incur, the people you meet, your peers, etc.) INFPs especially those that change majors incur alot of debt which can affect them for decades. Imagine putting the life you've always wanted on hold for 15 years because you couldn't pay off a student loan.

My favorite article about this is written on the site called Brazen Careerist on why doing what you love is bad advice:

Bad career advice: Do what you love | Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist
 

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Very wise words infpblog..couldn't agree more. I could have saved myself a few thousand dollars and an extra year of college if I wasn't so stuck on finding the perfect major, perfect job, passion this...blaagh!

Maybe it was getting older, or getting a bit more jaded, but I'm no longer concerned with having to be "passionate" about my work or finding my "perfect" career. I made a choice and I'm forcing myself to stick with the path that I choose...even if more info or feelings make me want to change my mind...I know rolling stones collect no moss. My career doesn't define who I am, but I do want a career that can afford me the type of lifestyle I desire.

I like what you wrote about doing what you love for yourself, and doing it for someone else..major difference.
 

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I enjoy my job, but I'm not necessarily passionate about it and I can't say I get much satisfaction from it. It's just something to support me while I'm studying at university, which is where my real passion and satisfaction are.

I'm a bartender. I know it's probably not the most normal job for an INFP, but I put on a different persona when I'm working than when I'm not, though it can be emotionally and mentally exhausting at times.
 

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My job doesn't pay super well, but I knew that coming in. It's more of a "have to" job right now considering jobs right now are a mess. I'm young and therefore I have many choices. Besides that, I enjoy doing what I'm doing, it's pretty flexible and it gets me "out there", which helps tons with communication...and getting out the house LOL.
 

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Not currently employed, but what the hell, someone might find it amusing/informative.

I'm 19 now, still living at home. These two things, means I'm somewhat desperate to just get out, I'm willing to take on pretty much any job, as long as it will pay enough to sustain me, a small apartment, and possibly a pet, and gifts for significant others. I'm not going to ask for more until I've settled that.

To be able to start living my own life, to get the chance at freedom I've yearned for long enough
 
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Followed my passion studying Spanish in college, then worked for DHL. Got a certificate in ESL after discovering that I never want to beome a highschool teacher (learning 2 years of spanish seems absolutely meaningless), went to a school that totally lied and manipulated me, now I'm scared to death of teaching. Was working at a supermarket and then a warehouse until I injured my back. Now I'm unemployed and continue to live at home. Never made more than 10.50 an hour and that isn't nearly enough to move out once you factor in my medical stuff. Hammerhand, I feel for ya. If we decide to measure our worth by the world's standards we will always come up short, imagine dating while having cerebral palsy! We got to know that we are valuable just as we are, and our desire to be independant and responsible will pay off in the end. For now, you might not get a date with Linsey Lohan, but who would want to? The good girls want much more than a financially secure arsehole, don't give up the fight.
 

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I am still in school, but I am going to be a crisis interventionist(or at least some other similar, social worker type job). Which obviously is not paid well. BUT it is the only thing I have ever wanted to do, and I could never be happy doing a miserable 9-5. I would much rather be happy and a little money-tight than miserable and rich any day of the week.
 

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I'm a computer programmer. I like my job, but I don't love my job like I use to. I say my job use to be an 8 and now it's a 6.5 and nothing's really changed about my job except me. INFPs make two assumptions with work which I don't understand.

1. They assume that the job their currently passionate about will always be something the continue to be passionate about.
2. They assume that building a work style equates to building a life style.

Both of those, I've discovered are completely untrue. No INFP, I've ever met or talked to online or in real life continues to be passionate about their initial chosen vocation. So when I see all the threads about INFPs trying to figure out their perfect career, I just shake my head wondering why their so stuck on something that they'll love for about 4 years and then just kind of like or grow to hate later. There's a huge difference between doing what you love on your own terms and doing what you love on a day-to-day basis for a company.

Also, what you do and why you do it is just your work style. And what you choose to do and how much you earn affects your life style (whether you get to travel, how much debt you incur, the people you meet, your peers, etc.) INFPs especially those that change majors incur alot of debt which can affect them for decades. Imagine putting the life you've always wanted on hold for 15 years because you couldn't pay off a student loan.

My favorite article about this is written on the site called Brazen Careerist on why doing what you love is bad advice:

Bad career advice: Do what you love | Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist
Right now, being 16 and a Junior in high school, I'm jobless and just focused on school work and some extra-curriculars, though I may end up getting some summer job just to get something onto my future resume and to have a little bit of spending money. One thing that I am surprised about, is that you haven't met any INFP's who have stuck with a career path. I guess the reason why this is strange to me is that my interests are relatively narrow, and my biggest passion with learning lies with psychology.

Since I was a small child, psychology has always interested me. I analyze almost every action that people take and try to think of solutions to what triggers those actions. But to get to the point, I don't really agree with the idea that I can't have a job that I absolutely love. The thought of being a therapist who could help patients with emotional problems, or being engrossed research about the chemicals behind love, are only two of many jobs in psychology that would capture my interest and leaving me feeling satisfied, while also creating a more positive atmosphere for whomever my work happens to affect.

One point that you may be trying to make is that we, as INFP's, need to cover our weaknesses by having some sort of practical job back-up. Maybe minor in finance or economics that give the skills for a financial cushion. This, I can completely understand.

I do have the feeling, however, that I will be one of those that end up sticking with a subject area that I love. As long as have some food on the table, which I expect to, I will be shooting for the stars and will be working diligently to fulfill a dream career. When its all said in done, I will expect my paycheck to be merely an added bonus to my feeling of fulfillment.
 

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I answered D. I like the people more than my job itself. Also, I'm going to start working at a Taco Bell soon. Eek. But it's for the best :angry:
 

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I chat online for a local outdoor company answering questions about the gear we sell. I work from home and the company is super chill and fun. I really enjoy my job, though i get 11 bucks an hour so its not the best pay out there, it gets me by while i'm paying for school.
 

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"We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for." John Keating (Robin Williams), Dead Poets Society

I work in an outdoors retail store. The work is mundane, but the subject matter of which I discuss with customers on a day to day basis is what I am passionate about. I enjoy helping people (that want help) to learn how to enjoy the outdoors! Some days the corporate trance gets to me, but for the most part I am trusted to do my job well and left alone to research products for myself (which also helps my sales ability).

I've been searching every day on job boards for something different; This is probably the best place for me right now, though. It isn't my life passion, but I can get paid to do something I half enjoy which is better than most alternatives.
 

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I'm a computer programmer. I like my job, but I don't love my job like I use to. I say my job use to be an 8 and now it's a 6.5 and nothing's really changed about my job except me. INFPs make two assumptions with work which I don't understand.

1. They assume that the job their currently passionate about will always be something the continue to be passionate about.
2. They assume that building a work style equates to building a life style.

Both of those, I've discovered are completely untrue. No INFP, I've ever met or talked to online or in real life continues to be passionate about their initial chosen vocation. So when I see all the threads about INFPs trying to figure out their perfect career, I just shake my head wondering why their so stuck on something that they'll love for about 4 years and then just kind of like or grow to hate later. There's a huge difference between doing what you love on your own terms and doing what you love on a day-to-day basis for a company.

Also, what you do and why you do it is just your work style. And what you choose to do and how much you earn affects your life style (whether you get to travel, how much debt you incur, the people you meet, your peers, etc.) INFPs especially those that change majors incur alot of debt which can affect them for decades. Imagine putting the life you've always wanted on hold for 15 years because you couldn't pay off a student loan.

My favorite article about this is written on the site called Brazen Careerist on why doing what you love is bad advice:

Bad career advice: Do what you love | Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist
I have heard so much about this book Do What You Are! It was mentioned in that awesome blog post you linked to. I am currently taking a break from school to figure out what I really want to study (and to pay off some debt); I am definitely going to go to the library tomorrow and check out that book! :crazy:
 

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Unemployed right now, but I am a full time University student. Took the summer off school to work. That turned into a disaster working for a morally inept painting company before quitting to go work for a glazing company as a fabricator (read person that does random jobs around the shop). All in all I thoroughly wish I started the summer off by working at the glazing company. But I digress.

Currently majoring in psychology at the local university. Hopefully I'll be able to transfer to SFU or UVIC, hell maybe even UBCO next fall. I really want to be out of my house and living in rez.
 

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Right now, being 16 and a Junior in high school, I'm jobless and just focused on school work and some extra-curriculars, though I may end up getting some summer job just to get something onto my future resume and to have a little bit of spending money. One thing that I am surprised about, is that you haven't met any INFP's who have stuck with a career path. I guess the reason why this is strange to me is that my interests are relatively narrow, and my biggest passion with learning lies with psychology.

Since I was a small child, psychology has always interested me. I analyze almost every action that people take and try to think of solutions to what triggers those actions. But to get to the point, I don't really agree with the idea that I can't have a job that I absolutely love. The thought of being a therapist who could help patients with emotional problems, or being engrossed research about the chemicals behind love, are only two of many jobs in psychology that would capture my interest and leaving me feeling satisfied, while also creating a more positive atmosphere for whomever my work happens to affect.

One point that you may be trying to make is that we, as INFP's, need to cover our weaknesses by having some sort of practical job back-up. Maybe minor in finance or economics that give the skills for a financial cushion. This, I can completely understand.

I do have the feeling, however, that I will be one of those that end up sticking with a subject area that I love. As long as have some food on the table, which I expect to, I will be shooting for the stars and will be working diligently to fulfill a dream career. When its all said in done, I will expect my paycheck to be merely an added bonus to my feeling of fulfillment.

There are 4 aspects that make up job satisfaction:

1. Your actual tasks and responsibilities.
2. A feeling of accomplishment.
3. Relationships with peers.
4. The quality of your boss.

Whenever INFPs discuss their dream job, all we seem to talk about is #2. We focus on how we'll feel in doing our job. We focus on the feeling of helping people as psychologists or shaping the minds of children as teachers. We think that that if we get #2, then the other 3 will work themselves out on their own.

INFPs tend to ignore number #1. So many INFPs have quit their majors or their jobs after realizing what the day to day entails. Teaching kids sounds great until you're grading papers until midnight and administration is wondering why your kids didn't score well on the last CSAPs and want you to change your teaching style or curriculum.

I find that most people who invest 4+ years into to a chosen profession have never actually spent the day with anyone in their chosen profession to see what the day-to-day is like. How much time is actually speaking with patients and how much time is administration and insurance? How many years of grunt work does someone actually have to do before you even get to have your own patients?

The other issue that INFPs are great at ignoring is that we don't work in a vacuum. We have peers and a boss. The quality of your boss is #1 factor in happiness and satisfaction at a job. They either help you or hinder you. What if your boss is an ESTJ with a fondness for micro-management? And they want detailed accounts of how many hours you spend doing what and what your plans are going forward. What if your boss doesn't like you? You have your dream job, but every day you go into work, your boss is making your life miserable by simply overlooking your accomplishments and giving raises to co-workers you feel are less deserving. What if your peers show you absolutely no respect? They ignore your advice and opinions.

I'm not talking about not achieving your dream career. I'm talking about getting a job in the field you wanted and realizing that the work wasn't what you idealized.
 
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My job used to be my dream job (computer programming). I'm trying to determine if it's the tasks that bore me out or the career itself, so I'm currently trying to find another programming job, or work as a contractor. No real luck so far though.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
There are 4 aspects that make up job satisfaction:

1. Your actual tasks and responsibilities.
2. A feeling of accomplishment.
3. Relationships with peers.
4. The quality of your boss.

Whenever INFPs discuss their dream job, all we seem to talk about is #2. We focus on how we'll feel in doing our job. We focus on the feeling of helping people as psychologists or shaping the minds of children as teachers. We think that that if we get #2, then the other 3 will work themselves out on their own.

INFPs tend to ignore number #1. So many INFPs have quit their majors or their jobs after realizing what the day to day entails. Teaching kids sounds great until you're grading papers until midnight and administration is wondering why your kids didn't score well on the last CSAPs and want you to change your teaching style or curriculum.

I find that most people who invest 4+ years into to a chosen profession have never actually spent the day with anyone in their chosen profession to see what the day-to-day is like. How much time is actually speaking with patients and how much time is administration and insurance? How many years of grunt work does someone actually have to do before you even get to have your own patients?

The other issue that INFPs are great at ignoring is that we don't work in a vacuum. We have peers and a boss. The quality of your boss is #1 factor in happiness and satisfaction at a job. They either help you or hinder you. What if your boss is an ESTJ with a fondness for micro-management? And they want detailed accounts of how many hours you spend doing what and what your plans are going forward. What if your boss doesn't like you? You have your dream job, but every day you go into work, your boss is making your life miserable by simply overlooking your accomplishments and giving raises to co-workers you feel are less deserving. What if your peers show you absolutely no respect? They ignore your advice and opinions.

I'm not talking about not achieving your dream career. I'm talking about getting a job in the field you wanted and realizing that the work wasn't what you idealized.
This is a very realistic advice.
it's very true, that we as INFPs often only take a look for aspect #2, while often forgetting that REALITY is often far more complex than our own thoughts, or our rose-colored dreams..
But it's like you said also about the "grunt work before having any patients": anything worth fighting or having for never comes easy!
"easy" only exists in our imaginations.
but the Reality is that the difficulties & adversity will TEST our dreams, and most importantly, make us GROW into fully-developed & wiser person. I need to always keep this in mind, while currently giving it all (100%) to pursue my dream-career, that is, Music.

"We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for." John Keating (Robin Williams), Dead Poets Society
I like this quote a lot.
makes me somewhat have faith again in what I'm currently pursuing: the Art of Music
thank you for posting this quote :)
 
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